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Old 12-18-2018, 03:16 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,612 posts, read 39,986,663 times
Reputation: 23754

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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlwaysBeachin View Post
I haven't been saving as I should. My current retirement savings is just over half of my current salary. :-(

I'm getting ready to kick it up to 10%, and I'm in my late 30s. If I don't start now, I'm SOL. Even with that, I MIGHT be able to retire at 65 if I don't have kids, get into some foreseen accident, get hit with a big illness and medical bills, etc.
You might want to step it up a bit... Earlier the better.

Do what you can... (you don't have to have huge bucks...)
you may not make it to age 40... (My parent went down (disabled) at age 46)

I did the (3) job thing from age 15 - 30 and NEVER touched my main job income (it all went to investment) I lived on PT job income. Once I was with spouse and child...++, my options tanked / created a challenge.

For any other young bucks... get it taken care of early (FIRE)
Another Engineer retiring in his 30's.
How They Retired Before 40
Why Everyone Should Plan to Retire Early

Retire early, retire often
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Old 12-18-2018, 03:29 PM
 
9,200 posts, read 9,280,929 times
Reputation: 28823
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlwaysBeachin View Post
I've come to realize that I've hated just about every single job I've had, and I'm not yet 40. Some of you on here mentioned that you hated your whole work life and couldn't wait until retirement from the beginning of your time in the workforce. How did you get through all those years?

I'm not naive enough to think work should be fun or exciting all the time. We work for an income to pay bills and take care of life's expenses. Some are lucky to be able to follow their passion and it produce an income for them. Most of us just have to accept something tolerable and live with it.

After awhile, it seems that all jobs become mentally (or physically) draining. Changing jobs often helps temporarily; but these days, even if you find something great, it never lasts. There are so many company buyouts, mergers, layoffs, management changes, etc. It can be frustrating to jump around and finally get something that's manageable, get settled; then, due to one of the aforementioned things, it comes to an end. You're left to start over, often taking another job you don't really want.

I know the key is to focus on the good aspects of your life and your life outside of work. The problem is that we spend the majority of 5 out of 7 days of our waking lives at work. How did you push yourself through long enough for retirement? We really have no choice, but how did you make it bearable?

As I get older, the more I want to live below my means, have 0 debt except the mortgage, etc. Money buys options if it can't buy happiness. Options give you flexibility to continually change your situation to maintain happiness. Living for Friday afternoons gets old, and the deep Sunday night blues get old too.
You are a sad person. I went to school to obtain a degree so that I could work in a field that I wanted to work in. I did exactly that and I enjoy virtually every day of my work. At age 59, I realize my working days are coming to an end. It will be with a heavy heart when I walk out the door for my last time somewhere around age 70.

This world though is full of people who do not plan, do not prepare, and seem to hate the idea of having to make an effort at anything. Such people are generally unhappy and tend not to go far in life. Employers can smell them when they apply for a job and see how many employers they have worked for along with the short time at each job.

I see them everywhere. They are the ones who race out the door five minutes before quitting time. They are the ones who use up all their leave without pay by June. They are the ones who sleep in until 10:00 a.m. on every day off. They are the ones who don't understand why retirement by 55 or 60 doesn't work for most people because of simple demographic issues. They are the ones who regard having to work as a jail sentence rather than an opportunity to learn and associate with others. They are the ones who waste their money on the lottery because all they think about is no longer having to work.

Good luck, people in many countries would give their eye teeth to live as Americans do. Its hard for me to feel sympathy for you.

Last edited by markg91359; 12-18-2018 at 04:49 PM..
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Old 12-18-2018, 03:58 PM
 
18 posts, read 11,744 times
Reputation: 139
Quote:
How'd You Make It Through All Those Years Hating Your Jobs?
I just think of the millions of people in this world that live and die in poverty, looking for food in garbage dumps. Then my hate for a job becomes a frivolous 1st world problem and get over it.

I'm halfway joking.

There's a saying in the military - "embrace the suck."

Part of happiness is embracing the suck, to see it as a platform to something else.

The other part is agency.

A) If you hate doing something, do it if you know it will get you somewhere you want to be.

B) If you hate doing something, and it has no value to you, then change it.

It's all about agency, personal responsibility. Unless you, the generic you, live and die eating off a 3rd world garbage dump, you have a significant say in how you live your life. Life ain't gonna give us the peaches we want, so we adapt, we move, we change.

I've had my fair shares of jobs I hated.

I did them for the money (the money is something I wanted... or needed).

Or I did them to get experience in an industry, to prepare me for a lateral move.

O I did them to tap on a social network.

Or I did them because crap! that's all there was (and better do that than laying on the ground to be eaten by worms.)

Either way, there was an objective, even if it was not clear in the mind. "This is something I need to do, to get from A to B, whatever that B might be."

That's how I got through them.

I've also found out, as I matured in my career, that my job is not my career, and that my career is not my life, and that my life is neither set in stone, nor is good if there are no paychecks coming.

Moreover, I came to realize that sometimes I hated jobs for no good reasons, and that it was me and my attitude and need to feel sorry for myself rather than the actual circumstances. I was being stupid.

This is all Yoda hand-waving from my part because my circumstances are bound to be different from someone' else.

Only you know what your life is like and what you value or do not value.

My rule is this: If you hate doing something, do it until it stops sucking if it gets you something you want or need.

And when it stops giving you what you want or need, then change it. Everything else is ruminating on sour grapes, and that is for suckers. Life is too short (and expensive) for that.
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Old 12-18-2018, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,687 posts, read 49,469,539 times
Reputation: 19134
I loathed my job.

I have worked many 40-hour shifts.

Everyone was watching, with one of my security clearances [called Personnel Reliability Program - PRP] I could not speak with any counselors about my problems. Even something as simple as going to a dentist had major restrictions under that program.

I lived months at a time underwater, no mail, no phone, no radio or TV, no females, ... usually about 7 months each year was spent underwater.

The only benefit from serving 20 years in the pension.

I traded my youth away in exchange for a pension.

Now as an old man my body is beginning to fail, and I must wonder if it was worth it.
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Old 12-18-2018, 04:45 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
14,245 posts, read 44,937,745 times
Reputation: 12841
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlwaysBeachin View Post
This is where I am after only about 13 years of it. I simply don't care anymore. I'm too young to be that way, but I figured the game out very early, and I really don't want to play it anymore.

What do you do anyway? I mean, working fast food or such is going to be a grind, and not fun. Or Wal-Mart, although I think even there, if you get into management, and are compatible with the corporate culture, you can have a decent career.



I got into nuclear power, lot of very interesting jobs, now work at a national lab, have visited Chernobyl while unit 3 was still running, all sorts of nuclear installations in Russia including Kurchatov. A lot of stuff I can't post about on here, but all good.


If you have any brains, and get a decent STEM degree, you should not have to work a "grind" job.


Or, for that matter, there are interesting blue-collar jobs, welder, electrician, etc. which are conducive to opening your own business if you have the chops for that, or just work for the other guy and rake in a decent paycheck for doing interesting work, craft work.
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Old 12-18-2018, 05:22 PM
 
Location: california
5,658 posts, read 4,885,458 times
Reputation: 6682
All too often people exchange the allure of money and future and fail to live in the present .
Neither money nor future are carved in stone they are a carrot dangled in front of your nose .


To live is to work and learn and find purpose while your do it .
Not wasting it on fantasies the media thrust at you or college professors lie with .
Working for a living is not meant to be FUN , if it were fun it wouldn't be called work .
One job I had I played music ,it was allowed , but since I've retired that music reminds me of work . I don't need the reminder . Not that work was bad, but I am retired and I just as soon leave that memory behind for better things to occupy my mind .
I the job is sweeping a floor ,do it better than any one else ever did ,even better then your self day by day. A menial job never the less necessary and important to the over all company, whether you can see what it's worth or not.
One boss I had told certain employees ," here it is , I can do your job, but you are not capable of doing mine , If I have to do your job too your are of no help to me."
Today more jobs are demanding "multitasking" . If one is unwilling to do this some one else will .
I have worked jobs here in the US that were predominantly foreigners , **** and moan all you want but if they take your job who's responsible. Business needs a job done .
I have had over a dozen different jobs in my lifetime ,all contributed to my education and to consecutive employers in developed skills . I have worked as a mechanic on machinery most of my life sometimes in the base of a sewer pump hole removing the pump .
I have worked on boats of every size, little 8' sabot to an aircraft carrier .
I have built things from the tiny stent you put in the cardiac artery, and worked on air compressors big as a motor home .

These were not the goal these were the result of not being afraid of trying something new and different ,
Some of my jobs were unpleasant but as time went by the situation ironed it self out . Either the old job folded or the new job presented itself at the right time .
Never been fired , and a letter of recommendation was usual ,
I your previous employers have nothing to write cautionary about you ,things can get better.
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Old 12-18-2018, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Ypsilanti, MI
2,448 posts, read 3,668,587 times
Reputation: 4820
I was lucky to find a career that I love, pays well, and is in demand by many potential employers. Sure, I have had some pin-head bosses, some downright abusive bosses, but a few really great bosses too.


I truly love what I do, so that makes even the bad days bearable.
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Old 12-18-2018, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Xxc
323 posts, read 99,972 times
Reputation: 615
I think about this too. How do people do it?! I can't, so I don't. Fortunately (or rather) unfortunately, I've always been taken care of; whether it be parents or now a husband, I never HAD to work. I've never been good at working anyway because of my ADD. multi tasking is way too hard for me. I can barely do a cashier job.

Most of my jobs have been part time.
I did enjoy working as a salon/ shampoo assistant and did enjoy working in offices moreso than retail, but I enjoyed salon work over offices.

So, if I/ when I go back to work, ( I'm a SAHM now) I will only look for salon work or offices...no more retail! I think it matters a lot that you at least somewhat enjoy your job...
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Old 12-18-2018, 07:26 PM
 
Location: plano
6,574 posts, read 8,110,360 times
Reputation: 5812
i didnt hate my job. Had 20 different ones with the same company over 38 years. I worked for a great company, full of challenging work, good people and honest ethics. It is a company that paid well and moved you along to different things to keep the business from getting stale and the workers too. Its in an industry hated but the work was not at all hated by me.
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Old 12-19-2018, 06:29 AM
 
Location: Gulf Coast
284 posts, read 596,273 times
Reputation: 448
Quote:
Originally Posted by markg91359 View Post
You are a sad person. I went to school to obtain a degree so that I could work in a field that I wanted to work in. I did exactly that and I enjoy virtually every day of my work. At age 59, I realize my working days are coming to an end. It will be with a heavy heart when I walk out the door for my last time somewhere around age 70.

This world though is full of people who do not plan, do not prepare, and seem to hate the idea of having to make an effort at anything. Such people are generally unhappy and tend not to go far in life. Employers can smell them when they apply for a job and see how many employers they have worked for along with the short time at each job.

I see them everywhere. They are the ones who race out the door five minutes before quitting time. They are the ones who use up all their leave without pay by June. They are the ones who sleep in until 10:00 a.m. on every day off. They are the ones who don't understand why retirement by 55 or 60 doesn't work for most people because of simple demographic issues. They are the ones who regard having to work as a jail sentence rather than an opportunity to learn and associate with others. They are the ones who waste their money on the lottery because all they think about is no longer having to work.

Good luck, people in many countries would give their eye teeth to live as Americans do. Its hard for me to feel sympathy for you.

Don't get me wrong, I am grateful for what I have. I just have extreme frustration with the corporate culture, the games, the fakeness, the politics, the stupid rules, etc. I am, by a long shot, not the only person on this board that's felt this way. In fact, I believe there's a great majority that have the same feelings. I'm a fast-paced, productive, and results-driven person. I see no need to put in "butt in seat" time for 40 hours just because that's the rules. Give me something and let me knock it out quickly or give me some kind of purpose besides making someone else rich. It takes money to make money most of the time, and if I could do what I want, I would have more control over making decisions. I would buy a couple of those self storage units--low overhead, high profit. I knew someone that did very well owning those things. I would do a job or a few different things that gave me variety and didn't chain me to a desk for 8+ hours a day. I'd have a part office/part field type job if I had to work for someone else. I've had them before and liked them, but there aren't many options for that. I'd love to do real estate appraisal--perfect office/field balance; but I'd have to find someone willing to train their replacement, go back to nothing pay for about 2 years, etc. In addition, the Feds got involved after the housing crash, and that career area is not as exciting as it once was. Many appraisers are not happy doing their job anymore.

I thrived in smaller companies where I could see my contributions meant something. I didn't waste my day going through redundant paperwork and sitting through meaningless meetings, and FWIW, I'm working on changing the situation. No, I don't want to work tons of hours unless I am self-employed and it benefits me. I have no problem doing my best, but as long as I work for someone else, I'm not going to put in ridiculous hours. There are plenty of jobs out there that don't require that. I will work to provide myself and my family a comfortable living, and when it's time to go home, I will. I draw the line at that. What you also don't realize is that when you do find these good jobs, many times they don't last. Buyouts/mergers, reorganization, layoffs, etc. Then, what happens? You're stuck trying to take whatever job to pay the bills and avoid the ax.



Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
What do you do anyway? I mean, working fast food or such is going to be a grind, and not fun. Or Wal-Mart, although I think even there, if you get into management, and are compatible with the corporate culture, you can have a decent career.



I got into nuclear power, lot of very interesting jobs, now work at a national lab, have visited Chernobyl while unit 3 was still running, all sorts of nuclear installations in Russia including Kurchatov. A lot of stuff I can't post about on here, but all good.


If you have any brains, and get a decent STEM degree, you should not have to work a "grind" job.


Or, for that matter, there are interesting blue-collar jobs, welder, electrician, etc. which are conducive to opening your own business if you have the chops for that, or just work for the other guy and rake in a decent paycheck for doing interesting work, craft work.
See above. I have a halfway decent degree in Finance with a high GPA. I've had some OK jobs; but it seems to be either "interesting/good job, bad boss" or "good boss/terrible job". A bad boss ruins a perfectly great job otherwise; that's how most jobs have become hated jobs.

Last edited by AlwaysBeachin; 12-19-2018 at 06:45 AM..
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