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Old 05-22-2019, 03:58 PM
 
6,309 posts, read 4,757,627 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piney Creek View Post
......She is 58 and it's hard for teachers over 50 to find jobs. She'd probably have to move to a new state and maybe get a job at a place like Walmart.
Where I live it is hard for anyone to get a teaching job. That has nothing to do with age, in fact getting a job is hardest for those just finishing school and without experience. Getting a job in a community college, or 4 year college or university is about impossible. Those hired full time typically have very specialized training, bring in grant money and have lots and lots of research and publications. Often teaching is done by adjuncts who are only paid for teaching a course or two. The pay is typically very low.
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Old 05-22-2019, 04:10 PM
 
6,665 posts, read 1,377,211 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jertheber View Post
It doesn't help that the media, i.e., AARP magazine is portraying us elders by photographing someone in their very early fifties (with possible silver dyed hair) as a fair representation of the elderly. We live in a world dominated by images of what we are "expected" to look like, the media has been the culprit for most of that, but we ourselves have added to that by attempting to "be" young in every way possible, dress, hairstyles, cars, etc.

It's almost as if the natural process of ageing is looked upon as something to "overcome" by buying and using the myriad of "products" designed to stop or slow down that process. Look at the world of celebrity, filled with those who look hideous in their later years due to their attempts to--look, BETTER?
Seriously, I thought about this just the other day, but you are the first person I "know" who has written about it! When are the great majority of people responsible for ads aimed at seniors going to realize that most seniors are not very attractive former models who are still very attractive, active and healthy! Most seniors do not look like those people any more than most 20-somethings look like Vogue models or people in ads for colognes!!! What is wrong with showing ads with average-looking seniors who have kept their health and are simply well-groomed? Once people retire, I would think that most people would stop feeling that they had to (or should) compete with other seniors regarding how attractive they are -- and in most other areas of life, too!

I also agree with the last sentence in your second paragraph, too! Well, the upside is that it makes me feel better about my natural senior looks!

Thanks for posting!

Last edited by katharsis; 05-22-2019 at 04:51 PM..
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Old 05-22-2019, 04:10 PM
 
3,604 posts, read 1,648,609 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piney Creek View Post



Regarding ageism at work, I do think it's a real phenomenon at some companies.
IBM is one such company
“ProPublica recently released the results of a sweeping investigation highlighting the alleged abuses of age discrimination conducted within the technology industry. It was reported that IBM fired about 20,000 American employees over the age of 40, which amounts to about 60% of its total U.S. job cuts during the time period in question” https://www.forbes.com/sites/jackkel.../#397f19015ce1

“IBM is again accused of age discrimination for firing older employees and refreshing its workforce with “early professionals.” https://insights.dice.com/2019/03/29...ation-lawsuit/
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Old 05-22-2019, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
3,551 posts, read 1,663,642 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Where I live it is hard for anyone to get a teaching job. That has nothing to do with age, in fact getting a job is hardest for those just finishing school and without experience. Getting a job in a community college, or 4 year college or university is about impossible. Those hired full time typically have very specialized training, bring in grant money and have lots and lots of research and publications. Often teaching is done by adjuncts who are only paid for teaching a course or two. The pay is typically very low.

Sorry to hear it's hard to get a teaching job in New York. Here in Virginia, there are actually a good number of teaching jobs--for those under 50. We would love to have her move down here, but of all the various openings at the local high schools and prep schools, only one even granted her an interview. She had a friend at that school, but his glowing reference wasn't enough to help. However, it did mean she got to hear the scuttlebutt. They hired a 20-something. Hopefully it was because the younger applicant was the most qualified person, but I kind of think someone with 40 years of experience might have more qualifications. Then again, what do I know.

By the way, my sister teaches prep school English, coaches, and is the department chair for the international student program. She's not a college professor, although I can see how you might have thought she was, since she is concerned about 3 colleges closing. But even though she's not a college professor, those closures are a concern for all the private schools in her region. She thought her job was safe because she's run the international student program for more than a decade and that's the one growing program in the school right now. But if the school closes, even having a "safe" job like that won't help.
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Old 05-22-2019, 04:57 PM
 
6,309 posts, read 4,757,627 times
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Does she have a masters degree? She would also need full, unrestricted licensure acceptable to qualify for reciprocity by the State of Virginia and she would need to complete the reciprocity determination before an application for teaching would be considered.

Last edited by jrkliny; 05-22-2019 at 05:09 PM..
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Old 05-22-2019, 07:13 PM
 
Location: Missouri
346 posts, read 161,468 times
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Exactly. The community college where I work gets over 100 applicants for each full-time teaching opening. You can be an excellent adjunct, but if you don't have a Ph.D., you'll get passed over because the institution gets so many candidates that do. I have heard this for years from a number of faculty members.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Where I live it is hard for anyone to get a teaching job. That has nothing to do with age, in fact getting a job is hardest for those just finishing school and without experience. Getting a job in a community college, or 4 year college or university is about impossible. Those hired full time typically have very specialized training, bring in grant money and have lots and lots of research and publications. Often teaching is done by adjuncts who are only paid for teaching a course or two. The pay is typically very low.
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Old 05-22-2019, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
3,551 posts, read 1,663,642 times
Reputation: 10174
She has at least one masters degree and various other certifications up the ying yang. Also has all the qualifications needed to be given a job in Virginia; she wouldn't have bothered to apply if she didn't. Looking for a new school after you've been with one that long isn't something you do on a whim; you make sure you have your ducks in a row. She even had the blessing of her headmaster and a really nice reference from him. He was happy to keep her when the job didn't work out but at the same time he understood the reasons his staff are starting to look around to see what else might be out there.

The problem wasn't that she was not qualified. The problem is that she's over 50. My opinion, of course (and the opinion of her friend who worked at the school she applied to). Others may not wish to see this as an example of ageism, and that's cool. As for me, that's what I think is going on here.
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Old 05-22-2019, 09:04 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,650 posts, read 17,623,979 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CatHerder View Post
Exactly. The community college where I work gets over 100 applicants for each full-time teaching opening. You can be an excellent adjunct, but if you don't have a Ph.D., you'll get passed over because the institution gets so many candidates that do. I have heard this for years from a number of faculty members.
And then you might make $50k annually.
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Old 05-22-2019, 10:55 PM
 
9,417 posts, read 6,285,185 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KaraZetterberg153 View Post
I recognize that this subject does not feel significant to many people, but it bothers me to a degree. I feel like I've been struggling against sexism my entire life; the sense that I'm being perceived as "less than" because I'm female. And now that I'm nearing retirement, ageism is being added on. See:

12 examples of everyday ageism - StarTribune.com

Anyone else feel this double-whammy, entering retirement?
Mikey tosses in the Red Bull Crap flag

As long as I'm on this side of the grass, who gives a damn?
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Old 05-23-2019, 01:16 AM
 
16 posts, read 4,486 times
Reputation: 49
I'm too young to put in my two cents. ^^ *hobbles away to find the super magnify computer readers*
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