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Old 05-29-2019, 02:55 PM
 
1,915 posts, read 4,603,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
Some people do spend too much time (for me) talking about health and children, but I listen because it's important to them. I would be a lousy friend if I didn't.
Yes, I agree. Mostly, in my experience, it's chatter about their grandchildren that goes on and on and on. But, as you mention, as friends, we listen, but begin kind of cringing when it just doesn't stop! LOL

Depending on how the last chapter is playing out, sometimes interests diverge even among friends in later life. Some are fixated on their health issues, some aren't physically able to do everything they want to do, some are traveling while others can't for any number of reasons (financial, physical, etc), and nothing is more boring than someone going on and on about their trips: "when we were in Mexico or Aruba or wherever, we did xyz," or whatever.

In any case, the last chapter plays out differently for everyone, and I think it's important to find a social group that shares similar interests, whether that's in a 55+ setting or not. I personally like a mixed-ages setting, but everyone finds their own comfort levels and hopefully finds a group they can interact with regularly.
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Old 05-29-2019, 03:42 PM
 
Location: 49th parallel
2,600 posts, read 1,357,733 times
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I was a bit dismayed when I opened this very interesting and timely thread, and found that there were already 9 pages of comments. So I apologize if I'm repeating something that's already been said since I have to admit I didn't read past the first few pages.

Here's my take on the "retirement complex" phenomenon:

Retirement places differ greatly in the amount of activities and amenities offered. Nowadays retirement complexes are a huge money-maker for developers, and since there are so many of us wanting them, it is now a big research job to find one that meets your special needs and wants. The trend with these new developments is to offer less and less for the same money. A glitzy-looking clubhouse sometimes is all you get that is different from any other subdivision. Some of these complexes don't even take care of the landscaping; you have to do it yourself.

At the opposite end of the spectrum, consider this: a huge clubhouse offering every club and type of activity you can think of, an inside swimming pool, five activity rooms, 3 fitness rooms, a huge theater, tennis, pickelball, and shuffleboard courts, free movies each week, dancing every week, 20 different athletic classes every day, biking trails, walking trails, outdoor pools for every few buildings, scheduled transportation each day to groceries, malls, etc., discussion groups, clubhouse library, cafe, music rooms. If you want to start an interest group you can reserve a room. The list goes on.

Now, I agree that as some posters have said, even with all these things to do, some people will not take part. But you see what I'm suggesting. Some people have moved to a "retirement place" and it's really not much different from the home they left. I've known lots of people who have been told what to do all their work life and now need to be "helped" to do new and different things.

Just my 2 cents.
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Old 05-29-2019, 05:23 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
200 posts, read 188,150 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xz2y View Post
Sounds like a great place! I'm looking around SW FL as well, and would love to know where you landed. DM me if you prefer. There are lots and lots of places to choose from in FL, some are good, some are full of transients and some are just in bad areas. It sounds like you found a great place!
Hi Xz2y,

I agree that you have to be careful of the different areas. Iím in Sarasota, Fl. Iím very happy here. There are many different communities here and styles of housing. I made several trips to the area prior to re-locating here. Initially, I rented an apartment in order to get familiar with the different areas. There are good areas and some less desirable ones. Thatís why Iím glad I didnít buy a place right away. If possible, maybe you could make a trip to this area just to get an idea what itís like. Best of luck to you.
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Old 05-29-2019, 06:36 PM
 
1,915 posts, read 4,603,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ndcairngorm View Post
At the opposite end of the spectrum, consider this: a huge clubhouse offering every club and type of activity you can think of, an inside swimming pool, five activity rooms, 3 fitness rooms, a huge theater, tennis, pickelball, and shuffleboard courts, free movies each week, dancing every week, 20 different athletic classes every day, biking trails, walking trails, outdoor pools for every few buildings, scheduled transportation each day to groceries, malls, etc., discussion groups, clubhouse library, cafe, music rooms. If you want to start an interest group you can reserve a room. The list goes on.
I guess this appeals to some people, as these places are very successful, though probably at the high end price-wise. For me personally, I don't care for the pre-determined structure and options in these fancy 55+ places. Too much scheduling. I'm an active 70 year old, still driving everywhere, and I prefer to "forge my own path," going out meeting people in various settings: choosing which gym I want to join and if I don't like it, choosing another; choosing which cafes to go to, choosing when to get groceries and which stores to go to, which library branch I want to go to, choosing which classes to take for seniors at a local university, etc.

I'm not someone who relates well to the pre-planned options. Maybe I'm too young for these kinds of structured 55+ places, and when I'm 80, and potentially less mobile, I may feel differently. Having "built-in" structure and options might be very appealing later in my life. But, in any event, the nice thing is that there are options for all types of people, at various stages of retirement, and at various stages of physical abilities.
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Old 05-29-2019, 06:43 PM
 
1,915 posts, read 4,603,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SUSMUSIC View Post
Hi Xz2y,

I agree that you have to be careful of the different areas. Iím in Sarasota, Fl. Iím very happy here. There are many different communities here and styles of housing. I made several trips to the area prior to re-locating here. Initially, I rented an apartment in order to get familiar with the different areas. There are good areas and some less desirable ones. Thatís why Iím glad I didnít buy a place right away. If possible, maybe you could make a trip to this area just to get an idea what itís like. Best of luck to you.
Exactly right. Renting first is the best option. I've taken a look at Sarasota and took a trip to St Petersburg a couple years ago and drove down to Sarasota. I didn't stay too long in Sota, but will plan an entire trip to that area if that's a direction for me to go.

Researching apartments is a big job. Many management companies that run these complexes have a lot of bad reviews (in Sarasota and elsewhere), and from what I'm reading on other forums, most complexes have a lot of short-term seasonal renters. This can create issues with year round renters who end up in a mostly empty complex for half the year.

One complex looked good and then some commenters posted that a separate company (Sonder) rented a block of apartments in the complex to use only for Air B&B rentals. Unbelievable. Talk about transient renters! The complex defended the decision (of course), since it meant $$ for them. But the longer term tenants were very angry, and rightly so, in my view. There was nothing in their lease about living with a bunch of nightly renters.

Not to hijack this thread, but if you can recommend some areas on Sota and also mention some areas of Sota that should be avoided, that would be very, very helpful. DM me if you can. Thanks!
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Old 05-29-2019, 08:09 PM
 
28,232 posts, read 39,872,938 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xz2y View Post
I guess this appeals to some people, as these places are very successful, though probably at the high end price-wise. For me personally, I don't care for the pre-determined structure and options in these fancy 55+ places. Too much scheduling. I'm an active 70 year old, still driving everywhere, and I prefer to "forge my own path," going out meeting people in various settings: choosing which gym I want to join and if I don't like it, choosing another; choosing which cafes to go to, choosing when to get groceries and which stores to go to, which library branch I want to go to, choosing which classes to take for seniors at a local university, etc.

I'm not someone who relates well to the pre-planned options. Maybe I'm too young for these kinds of structured 55+ places, and when I'm 80, and potentially less mobile, I may feel differently. Having "built-in" structure and options might be very appealing later in my life. But, in any event, the nice thing is that there are options for all types of people, at various stages of retirement, and at various stages of physical abilities.
Just because the structure is in place doesn't meant you have to avail yourself of it. Stay independent, but enjoy what is available.

Our community has 4 community centers with various options. We use some of them, but not all. We decline the planned bus trips to the stores, casinos, etc, but there may be a time in the future that we will need them.
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Old 05-29-2019, 08:27 PM
 
1,915 posts, read 4,603,555 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tek_Freek View Post
Just because the structure is in place doesn't meant you have to avail yourself of it. Stay independent, but enjoy what is available.

Our community has 4 community centers with various options. We use some of them, but not all. We decline the planned bus trips to the stores, casinos, etc, but there may be a time in the future that we will need them.
Absolutely correct. But one is paying for those amenities, even if they aren't utilized, so that's a consideration. But if it's a place that one is committed to staying in over the long haul, then it's probably a good investment. As you mention, the options are there if/when you want them. I could certainly see myself utilizing more structured options if I was less mobile at some point. Glad you found a place that works well for you!
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Old 05-30-2019, 10:42 AM
 
34 posts, read 9,268 times
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I started out leaning toward 55+ but I really want an indoor heated pool for winter because I lap swim every day. The rest of the activities don't really interest me that much.

Like xz2y, I decided that I'd rather uncouple the health club part. I visited one 55+ on my last trip where the indoor pool had been closed for a couple of months. Got me thinking about how much due diligence one has to do to make sure the place isn't going to stop maintaining the amenities you use. Boy would I feel had if I was locked in and paying a premium for them.

Going back for more looking around in July. I hope to come back with a year lease in an apartment building somewhere to the north or west of Orlando. I have it down to 9 places, but since I only have 9 days I will have to narrow it down some more.
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Old 05-30-2019, 10:57 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
3,551 posts, read 1,648,849 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by heatlamp View Post
I visited one 55+ on my last trip where the indoor pool had been closed for a couple of months. Got me thinking about how much due diligence one has to do to make sure the place isn't going to stop maintaining the amenities you use. Boy would I feel had if I was locked in and paying a premium for them.

That's a fair point. It's worthwhile to check into the history of a community to see if they've had issues like that along the way, and maybe talk to a few residents if you can. When I was looking, I looked for old issues of a community newsletter. Often they will be archived online. If you look at a few issues from previous years and it seems like you see a lot of announcements such as "The repair of the tennis courts has been delayed again and is now predicted to take place six months from now" that could be an issue.


I recall one community in Delaware that made all sorts of grandiose promises of recreational facilities when we looked at it 3 years ago. None of them have been built yet, but they're still being promised. Meanwhile, the community has had some serious financial problems. How much you want to bet those thigns will never be built.
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Old 05-30-2019, 12:48 PM
 
171 posts, read 127,710 times
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Default I wanted to be a librarian my whole life.

As you need an MLS to be a librarian and when I graduated from college I just needed a job fast - I took a government job, soul killing, horrible pressure - gave me bleeding ulcers.
Years later, I finally was able to go to night school to go for that Masters, while still keeping my day job, at age 50 I got it.

Early retirement was offered at the "soul killer" job so I grabbed it and was able to find a part time job at a local college library.
I never had such a wonderful job - I didn't think there was such a thing. One thing - the assnt director was on sabbatical - I didn't think much of that so I was a happy as a pig in a mud pile for a year - until she came back.
Ugh! The nice Director retired and she took his job - terrible. How can one person be so great and the other one be so vile.
After a year of suffering I just quit and did volunteer work for a local museum and golldangit - if the same thing didn't happen again - wonderful volunteer coordinator was forced out for an out of state young twit who was an officious bureaucrat - all the volunteers just quit.
Ugh.

Why are there so many miserable bosses out there - they make everyone so unhappy and hate to go to work.
Sorry if I deviated a bit from the original topic -...just had to get that out.
P.S. No more libraries for me - I've heard similar from other librarians. You just think they are dream places to work - no they are not - tons of backbiting and jealousy.
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