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Old 05-31-2019, 03:23 AM
 
Location: R.I.
970 posts, read 603,310 times
Reputation: 4175

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bette View Post
This has helped me. I appreciate all the stories, all the comments. It's been a lifelong struggle.

Not sure if sharing about my visual impairment helped you, just wanted you to know you are not alone in your struggles with your vision. For me also having an unusual vision issue and finding a FB group dedicated to this condition has been of great help to me. And through the sharing of experiences of this group prompted me to see a low vision specialist and the glasses prescribed by this doctor with the particular tint to the lenses made a huge impact on my ability to tolerate changing light.


Wishing you the best as you navigate this difficult health concern.
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Old 05-31-2019, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
14,688 posts, read 8,472,440 times
Reputation: 29365
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bette View Post
As many of you know, I've had vision issues since birth.

An older sister died at 5 days old - she was around the same weight I was (1 pound 9 ounces) at 26 weeks.

When I was born, I weighed the same and was in NICU for months. During that time, they gave me too much oxygen; it killed the nerves so I'm blind in 1 eye (always) and 20/60 (now with correction) - used to be 20/50 in the "good" eye which isn't so good.

One of the things I fear is a retinal detachment.

I have a retinal specialist I go to but lately, he has been way into the experimental stuff.

Has anyone had one of these and if so, what led up to it and what was the outcome? I know they can do wonderful things today. Time is my friend.

Losing my sight is the only thing I fear.
I don't know what this means. I have worked as as ophthalmic tech for many years and assisted retinal surgeons as well. There is nothing you can do to prevent a retinal detachment. It will either happen or it won't. A major risk factor is high myopia (greater than -7.00,) which thins the retinal lining. You have a retinal specialist, and I assume you see him frequently for retinal checkups. Monitor your vision for wavy lines, large floaters, or a black curtain over your line of vision. If these occur, see an ophthalmologist immediately, even if it's not during office hours.
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Old 05-31-2019, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,164 posts, read 8,687,150 times
Reputation: 6166
Smile All of this has helped

For example, when I go to the doctor, often other people are called in. They often turn around and talk in low voices or use terms way out of my scope.

Now, I can assume they are calling in others due to how different my case is or just to get another opinion.

Everything has helped on this thread.

Thanks again.
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Old 05-31-2019, 08:53 AM
 
Location: A safe distance from San Francisco
8,542 posts, read 6,138,299 times
Reputation: 8467
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
I don't know what this means. I have worked as as ophthalmic tech for many years and assisted retinal surgeons as well. There is nothing you can do to prevent a retinal detachment. It will either happen or it won't. A major risk factor is high myopia (greater than -7.00,) which thins the retinal lining. You have a retinal specialist, and I assume you see him frequently for retinal checkups. Monitor your vision for wavy lines, large floaters, or a black curtain over your line of vision. If these occur, see an ophthalmologist immediately, even if it's not during office hours.
This is absolutely false.
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Old 05-31-2019, 09:14 AM
 
6,220 posts, read 4,718,283 times
Reputation: 12730
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrownVic95 View Post
This is absolutely false.
And you have specific training and experience in the field?
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Old 05-31-2019, 09:17 AM
 
3,321 posts, read 642,373 times
Reputation: 2292
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
I don't know what this means. I have worked as as ophthalmic tech for many years and assisted retinal surgeons as well. There is nothing you can do to prevent a retinal detachment. It will either happen or it won't. A major risk factor is high myopia (greater than -7.00,) which thins the retinal lining. You have a retinal specialist, and I assume you see him frequently for retinal checkups. Monitor your vision for wavy lines, large floaters, or a black curtain over your line of vision. If these occur, see an ophthalmologist immediately, even if it's not during office hours.
While there can be instances where a retinal detachment occurs with no warning, and thus there was nothing you could have done, it is often preceded by signs of a retinal tear. In those cases, if a person quickly gets to a retinal specialist, he can laser seal the tear and usually prevent it from advancing to a detachment.

In my case, I have had numerous tears, both eyes. In all cases except one, which resulted in a detachment, I had the swarm of mini-floaters (blood drops) and went immediately to the office. The doctor lasered them sealed.

Another thing a person with retinal issues should do, which I imagine anyone with a brain would do, is have regular checks of the retinas to look for small tears which have started, and take quick action if any are detected.
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Old 05-31-2019, 11:10 AM
 
Location: East Mt Airy, Philadelphia
1,017 posts, read 1,036,731 times
Reputation: 1791
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasperhobbs View Post
I had a retinal tear and the fear was it could detach. Fortunately, it was just a tear and I had surgery and everything is fine. The thing I learned, is if you start having vision problems like wavy lines or flashes, get to a doctor ASAP. If the retina detaches, you don't have much time before you can permanently lose vision in the eye. They need to do surgery quickly to save the vision.
I couldn't agree more with this and similar comments in other posts. Just as with other unwanted stuff - heart attack, stroke, et al. - the sooner you receive treatment from someone you trust, the better. I had a eye issue about a month ago, kinda bolted to my ophthalmologist, and am on the road to recovery. The dr. said that he often sees people who've been having wavy lines, blurred vision, etc. etc. for WEEKS before coming in. His comment on that: "there's no cure for stupid."
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Old 05-31-2019, 11:50 AM
 
Location: A safe distance from San Francisco
8,542 posts, read 6,138,299 times
Reputation: 8467
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel976 View Post
While there can be instances where a retinal detachment occurs with no warning, and thus there was nothing you could have done, it is often preceded by signs of a retinal tear. In those cases, if a person quickly gets to a retinal specialist, he can laser seal the tear and usually prevent it from advancing to a detachment.

In my case, I have had numerous tears, both eyes. In all cases except one, which resulted in a detachment, I had the swarm of mini-floaters (blood drops) and went immediately to the office. The doctor lasered them sealed.

Another thing a person with retinal issues should do, which I imagine anyone with a brain would do, is have regular checks of the retinas to look for small tears which have started, and take quick action if any are detected.
Excellent, Rachel - thank you.

I'll throw out another thing while we're on this subject that doesn't get enough mention by eye care professionals. From my personal experience, I know that many are not even aware of it. And that is eye rubbing....I'm talking about the vigorous kind of eye rubbing that profoundly changes the eyeball shape and pressures as the eyeball is massaged back and forth. The kind of eye rubbing that a bad allergy season instinctively brings about. The kind of eye rubbing that directly led to my first tear in 2002.

That was a terrible spring here for allergies and my eyes were driving my crazy with watering and itching. Rubbing was such a relief and I did it frequently for days. I knew of no reason not to. There was one night, though, that was worse than usual and I remember rubbing more vigorously than I typically did. I rubbed back and forth to beat the band and it was wonderful relief. Relief that helped me sleep better that night in ignorance of the damage I had done. For when I opened my eyes the next morning and looked out my window, I was aghast and said what the heck is this?. A field dotted with dozens, perhaps hundreds, of spots.

Prior to that, I knew nothing of this kind of eye injury. But I learned so much, so fast. Then, on reflection, it made perfect sense that vigorous rubbing could bring it on. For a retina tear or detachment is a physical injury to the eye. And it is so easy to see how and why fast changing physical force on the eye could break loose a retina or portion thereof - particularly in older people whose vitreous has shrunk and is already trying to pull away.

Now, a case could be made that refraining from rubbing your eyes for people prone to tears is possibly only a postponement. But, in my book, any postponement of serious health issues is a good thing!

Eventually, I had a tear in my other eye. But not for 10 more years. From that first experience in 2002, I had steadfastly refrained from any serious eye rubbing. There's not a shred of doubt in my mind that I brought on that first tear with vigorous rubbing the night before.
Quote:
For instance, people with progressive myopia a common type of short-sightedness caused by a lengthened eyeball can find their eyesight worsens. In some cases, their retina detaches from the back of the eye.


McMonnies says that's probably because an already weakened retina is placed under more strain with successive pressure blips.
https://www.abc.net.au/health/talkin...18/3592456.htm

Bottom line is that, yes, there are most definitely things people can do to reduce their chances of retinal detachment.
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Old 05-31-2019, 01:01 PM
 
Location: Honolulu
1,350 posts, read 544,581 times
Reputation: 1102
I wrote the following in another thread under Cataract:

I had cataract surgery done on both eyes in my early 50s. I thought I was the exception. But my co-worker who is younger than I also had the same problem.

The reason is because I live in Hawaii. The UV is too strong.

Cataract is not so scary. Retinal detachment is definitely scary. Two years after I had my cataract surgery and three months after my annual eye exam which showed everything was okay, during my trip to NYC suddenly one eye lost vision when I watched a Broadway show. I was not aware of it until I went to visit an eye doctor in NJ (which is a pain in axx to make an appointment for non-scheduled visit as a new patient).

The eye surgeon detected the problem and referred me to see a retinal specialist right away. The retinal specialist offered me two options: (1) Do the surgery in NJ but cannot fly for one month, otherwise my eye will explode and become blind permanently. (2) Make an appointment on behalf of me with the best retinal specialist in Honolulu and do the surgery after I fly back.

But I was on a family trip and still had one week to go before my trip was over. Moreover, it was summer time and it was prohibitively expensive to rebook all our family's air tickets. The NJ retinal specialist said that the surgery could be pending for 10 days. He also said that according to NJ law, it is okay to drive with one eye. So I picked the second option.

Then I continued my trip to Niagara Fall. In the middle of the way, it rained dogs and cats. The problem with one eye driving is I can't tell the spatial distance, i.e. exactly how far is my car behind the car in front. So I drove most of the time @ 45 mph on the slow lane.

When I came back to Honolulu, I had the surgery two days afterwards. It was a SEVEN hour surgery (cataract surgery lasted 20 minutes). Fortunately I retained 90% of my vision. The retinal specialist in Honolulu told me that in many cases, the patient will lose half or even more of their vision after the surgery. I am one of the lucky few.
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Old 05-31-2019, 02:19 PM
 
Location: A safe distance from San Francisco
8,542 posts, read 6,138,299 times
Reputation: 8467
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ian_Lee View Post
I wrote the following in another thread under Cataract:

I had cataract surgery done on both eyes in my early 50s. I thought I was the exception. But my co-worker who is younger than I also had the same problem.

The reason is because I live in Hawaii. The UV is too strong.

Cataract is not so scary. Retinal detachment is definitely scary. Two years after I had my cataract surgery and three months after my annual eye exam which showed everything was okay, during my trip to NYC suddenly one eye lost vision when I watched a Broadway show. I was not aware of it until I went to visit an eye doctor in NJ (which is a pain in axx to make an appointment for non-scheduled visit as a new patient).

The eye surgeon detected the problem and referred me to see a retinal specialist right away. The retinal specialist offered me two options: (1) Do the surgery in NJ but cannot fly for one month, otherwise my eye will explode and become blind permanently. (2) Make an appointment on behalf of me with the best retinal specialist in Honolulu and do the surgery after I fly back.

But I was on a family trip and still had one week to go before my trip was over. Moreover, it was summer time and it was prohibitively expensive to rebook all our family's air tickets. The NJ retinal specialist said that the surgery could be pending for 10 days. He also said that according to NJ law, it is okay to drive with one eye. So I picked the second option.

Then I continued my trip to Niagara Fall. In the middle of the way, it rained dogs and cats. The problem with one eye driving is I can't tell the spatial distance, i.e. exactly how far is my car behind the car in front. So I drove most of the time @ 45 mph on the slow lane.

When I came back to Honolulu, I had the surgery two days afterwards. It was a SEVEN hour surgery (cataract surgery lasted 20 minutes). Fortunately I retained 90% of my vision. The retinal specialist in Honolulu told me that in many cases, the patient will lose half or even more of their vision after the surgery. I am one of the lucky few.
Sorry you had to go through that.

Can you elaborate on what exactly had happened in your eye? And, do you or the doctors have any reason to suppose that the problem was at all related to your previous cataract surgery?
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