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Old 05-31-2019, 11:34 PM
 
685 posts, read 157,221 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel976 View Post
I had a retinal detachment. I was at high risk because of the elongated shape of my eyeballs and the existence of lattice degeneration. I was told to watch for the warning signs, one of which was a sudden burst of floaters.

The retina had detached, and I had the typical "black curtain" coming down. I was at the hospital within hours for the reattachment surgery, and the outcome was good. I see about 20/60 in that eye now, which can be corrected completely (20/20) with glasses. I am delighted with the results, although I am always on the look-out (pun intended) for a repeat in that eye or a new occurrence in the other.

The post-recovery was difficult in that I had to keep my head down for 22 hours a day. (I could lift it to eat, limiting my upright position to 30 minutes at a time.) I was told this was crucial to a good outcome, and I followed the instructions exactly. But wow, my neck was killing me, and I had to keep this routine for 5 days.

All in all, I am very grateful that we have the surgical advancements that we do. Had this been 50 years ago, I would have been blind in that eye, for sure.

Just be very alert to the warning signs, and get thee to a retinal specialist at the first sign. If it happens in a weekend, do NOT wait until Monday. Irreversible vision loss begins at around the 24-hour point.




I had a retinal tear in my left eye for the same reason as this poster, and I was much younger than 60. It began on a Sunday afternoon and it was the sensation of a black curtain being pulled over the eye. I live in the boondocks and I called the “on call” Dr. at the clinic I went to THREE TIMES as it progressively worsened and each time the idiot told me it was floaters!

I finally went to the ER at the small local hospital and they examined me (with a slit lamp?), and were able to arrange for me to see a retina specialist that Monday morning (this specialist traveled from another town 60 miles away, so I was fortunate, that, if it was going to happen, that it did on that particular weekend). The retina specialist lasered the tear and explained to me that, in addition to the elongated eyeball (caused by extreme myopia), the vitreous gel in the eyeball shrinks as we age and retinal tearing possibly can occur and progress to complete detachment. In fact, he said it had already happened in my right eye, but, fortunately, no tearing of the retina of the right eye occurred.

My vision was pretty impaired for about 4 months due to the amount of blood that had to reabsorb into the body and I now occasionally see floaters, which look like a swarm of fruit flies, but I’m extremely grateful that I can see, and that my health insurance (I had started a new job) became effective only one week before this happened.

I’ve always had a fear of blindness due to my extreme myopia (corrected with contact lenses), so Bette, I completely understand your fears. This was an extremely scary event for me, and I would have really appreciated reading a forum like this, because, IMO, it’s reassuring to know that you are not alone in this.

If I were in your position, I would seek a 2nd opinion for peace of mind. I’ll always be grateful to the retina specialist who helped me.

BTW, I have a Class A CDL and I passed the vision test recently, so I guess I’m doing OK!
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Old 05-31-2019, 11:59 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
39,522 posts, read 47,675,353 times
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At 65 had retina detachment, ophthalmologist met me immediately at the out patient clinic, did the zap zap zap repair with the laser, 15 minutes later driving home, e-z peasy.
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Old 06-01-2019, 05:21 AM
 
2,442 posts, read 2,067,677 times
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Originally Posted by wit-nit View Post
At 65 had retina detachment, ophthalmologist met me immediately at the out patient clinic, did the zap zap zap repair with the laser, 15 minutes later driving home, e-z peasy.
I thought it was a lot more complicated than that. Are you sure it wasn't just a tear? A detachment is much more serious.
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Old 06-01-2019, 05:51 AM
 
3,316 posts, read 640,659 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wit-nit View Post
At 65 had retina detachment, ophthalmologist met me immediately at the out patient clinic, did the zap zap zap repair with the laser, 15 minutes later driving home, e-z peasy.
That wasn't a full retinal detachment.....it was a tear, preceding the detachment. Had it been a detachment, it would have been a hospital procedure and a difficult recovery. Believe me, I've experienced both, and I know the difference.
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Old 06-02-2019, 06:48 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
14,684 posts, read 8,468,648 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
I don't know what this means. I have worked as as ophthalmic tech for many years and assisted retinal surgeons as well. There is nothing you can do to prevent a retinal detachment. It will either happen or it won't. A major risk factor is high myopia (greater than -7.00,) which thins the retinal lining. You have a retinal specialist, and I assume you see him frequently for retinal checkups. Monitor your vision for wavy lines, large floaters, or a black curtain over your line of vision. If these occur, see an ophthalmologist immediately, even if it's not during office hours.
Quote:
Originally Posted by CrownVic95 View Post
This is absolutely false.
Please enlighten us as to your years of experience as retinal surgeon or tech that gives you authority on this.
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Old 06-02-2019, 06:57 AM
 
2,744 posts, read 987,380 times
Reputation: 3203
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
I don't know what this means. I have worked as as ophthalmic tech for many years and assisted retinal surgeons as well. There is nothing you can do to prevent a retinal detachment. It will either happen or it won't. A major risk factor is high myopia (greater than -7.00,) which thins the retinal lining. You have a retinal specialist, and I assume you see him frequently for retinal checkups. Monitor your vision for wavy lines, large floaters, or a black curtain over your line of vision. If these occur, see an ophthalmologist immediately, even if it's not during office hours.
This is what my ophthalmologist has told me also. I have the beginning of one and keep checking on it. My vision has changed and I keep an eye for floaters, light and curtain effect, but so far he says it hasn’t progressed much but I’m at a higher risk due to high myopia but nothing that can be done to prevent it.
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Old 06-02-2019, 07:01 AM
 
3,316 posts, read 640,659 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Sportsfan View Post
This is what my ophthalmologist has told me also. I have the beginning of one and keep checking on it. My vision has changed and I keep an eye for floaters, light and curtain effect, but so far he says it hasn’t progressed much but I’m at a higher risk due to high myopia but nothing that can be done to prevent it.
What does that mean that you have the "beginning of one"? That the ophthalmologist sees a little tear starting to form? Then why doesn't he laser seal it so it won't advance? I think you need to see a retinal specialist.
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Old 06-02-2019, 07:28 AM
 
2,744 posts, read 987,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rachel976 View Post
What does that mean that you have the "beginning of one"? That the ophthalmologist sees a little tear starting to form? Then why doesn't he laser seal it so it won't advance? I think you need to see a retinal specialist.
Thanks for your advice and I am seeing one. The advice from her also was to keep an eye on it no other treatment at the moment.
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Old 06-02-2019, 07:35 AM
 
3,316 posts, read 640,659 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Beach Sportsfan View Post
Thanks for your advice and I am seeing one. The advice from her also was to keep an eye on it no other treatment at the moment.
Good; I'm glad you're seeing a retinal specialist. But I still don't know what she means by a detachment "beginning". Does she mean a tear? Or does she mean lattice degeneration, which is really more of a weakened retinal condition than the actual beginning of a detachment. If the latter, I agree....nothing you can do about that.

I'm not trying to give you a hard time. I have had eight retinal tears, and in each case, they were sealed with a laser. My retinologist said they definitely needed to be treated. In only one case, where a tear had formed and I had no warning signs (like little floaters and lights) did I NOT get the tear sealed, since I didn't know about it, and i did end up with a detachment. Believe me, you want to avoid that if at all possible by sealing tears, if that's what your retinal specialist means by "beginning" of a detachment.
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Old 06-03-2019, 09:27 AM
 
8,179 posts, read 11,900,573 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bette View Post
Thank you all for the information that you have shared.

My situation is so unusual that doctors seem stumped and most have backed away from doing anything.
You live in South Florida, home of one of the world's foremost eye institutes in the entire world (and has been rated the best eye hospital in the USA year after year). Have you thought about traveling down to Miami to see a specialist at Bascom Palmer?

https://umiamihealth.org/bascom-palmer-eye-institute

Bascom Palmer Physicians Named Among World

U.S. News & World Report has ranked Bascom Palmer Eye Institute the Number One program in ophthalmology in the country for 14 consecutive years. The Institute is also recognized as having the best residency program in ophthalmology in the nation by Doximity.com, the largest online physician network. Most recently, Ophthalmology Times ranked Bascom Palmer Eye Institute the “#1 Overall Ophthalmology Program,” “The Best in Clinical Care,” and “The Best Residency Program in the United States.”
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