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Old 06-04-2019, 11:42 AM
 
Location: SLC
465 posts, read 425,656 times
Reputation: 822

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Thought this article from the NY Times might be of broad interest in this forum...

https://www.nytimes.com/2019/06/04/h...on-deaths.html
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Old 06-04-2019, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Eureka CA
8,239 posts, read 11,102,038 times
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Good info! I used to fall until I quit Xanax.
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Old 06-04-2019, 12:36 PM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 15 days ago)
 
8,675 posts, read 10,828,629 times
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When people start falling frequently, it's not a great sign. I looked at a study a while back and it's a predictor of overall health decline, which makes sense. Occasional fall might not be too "bad," but more frequently something going on that needs to be looked into.

We get them where I work. They break a hip, have to go to rehab and then come back. Many do pretty well after that, for months or years! This surprised me, didn't think most could go through surgery and rehab and go back to activity, but many do. And, they are in their 90's. Depends on the person's overall health/strength, the type of break, their "will" to get better, etc.
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Old 06-04-2019, 12:43 PM
 
Location: Lakewood OH
21,699 posts, read 23,648,620 times
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Recently a 92 year old very active neighbor of mine fell and injured her leg. She had to be in rehab for a few weeks then was given a walker and told to take it easy. She didn't.

A couple of days ago she fell and broke the leg. Recovery time will take much longer.

Both times she injured herself through carelessness. The first was when someone knocked on her door while she was putting her pants on and instead of just letting them continue to knock, she moved too fast and lost her balance trying to get to the door and tripped on her pant leg. The second time she again lost her balance while trying to make her bed which she should not have been doing.

Maybe it's because we keep thinking we're invincible because we've reached an advanced age and are still alive. Maybe we're exercising over zealously.

I think injuries are often due because it becomes a bragging event to talk about the most movement we can do "at our age" be it sports, exercise or what have you. We're ashamed to admit we'd too old to do this or that even though we are. We feel shamed every time someone our age does something surprisingly athletic or physical and we're told they should inspire us to do the same. We don't want sensible slowing down to appear as calling it quits, we push on farther than we should.

It's all about fighting the aging process. We don't have to go "gentle into that good night" but we don't have to barrel into it either.
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Old 06-04-2019, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,653 posts, read 3,235,973 times
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^^^^^^^^^ I really agree with the above.
I have had to admit to myself that I can't do what I used to be able to do and in a way it has been a bitter pill.

But I'm gradually accepting it and feel grateful for that.
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Old 06-04-2019, 01:50 PM
 
Location: Omaha, Nebraska
7,291 posts, read 4,145,583 times
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On my last visit to my parents' house, I was surprised and pleased to see that they had finally discarded most of the throw rugs they'd previously had in the front door hallway and in front of the furniture. Sometimes just a bit of rearranging can lower the fall hazard considerably!
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Old 06-04-2019, 02:13 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
7,596 posts, read 4,674,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal1542 View Post
^^^^^^^^^ I really agree with the above.
I have had to admit to myself that I can't do what I used to be able to do and in a way it has been a bitter pill.
I can't even remember how I did some of what I used to be able to do.

I asked DH the other day how we got out of the bathtub when we were young. It was long most homes had grab bars. Now, with some tubs I can boost myself up against the wall pushing up with my arms and legs, then reaching forward to grab the bar. Pretty sure I didn't do that as a teenager, though.

He thinks we flipped over in the tub so we were face down, got on our knees and stood up.
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Old 06-04-2019, 05:16 PM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
7,216 posts, read 12,651,511 times
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My 85-year-old mother had a bad fall on Thursday 3/7/19, not quite 3 months ago. She is now bedridden and under hospice care and will likely die over the next few weeks/months.

I'd always heard that falls were extremely serious for elderly people, but this has really brought it home. From living independently in her own apartment to death in a few months.
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Old 06-04-2019, 05:32 PM
 
3,538 posts, read 1,344,614 times
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same here:
my 96-year-old Mother who, last year, could still safely drive her car in town,
(and has a perfect driving record for 83 years since she started driving at 13)
is now in a Nursing Home due to a fall in her home.
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Old 06-04-2019, 07:02 PM
 
Location: northern New England
2,436 posts, read 1,057,100 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
I can't even remember how I did some of what I used to be able to do.

I asked DH the other day how we got out of the bathtub when we were young. It was long most homes had grab bars. Now, with some tubs I can boost myself up against the wall pushing up with my arms and legs, then reaching forward to grab the bar. Pretty sure I didn't do that as a teenager, though.

He thinks we flipped over in the tub so we were face down, got on our knees and stood up.

This is what I do on the rare occasions when I take a bath instead of a shower. Old clawfoot tub, no grab bars. It does have the advantage of being very sturdy so I can pull myself up by hanging on the side. It will be a toss up what does me in first, as far as having to find a different place to live - the stairs or the tub. Hopefully neither for a long time.




After DH had a stroke, someone from the council on aging came out and looked at the house with suggestion for "age-proofing." Like getting rid of throw rugs, etc.
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