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Old 06-13-2019, 11:38 AM
 
Location: Cochise County, AZ
1,316 posts, read 832,470 times
Reputation: 2864

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
The other day my oldest niece asked me how i was enjoying retirement and i said "It's Ok".

It just made me realize that i need to start appreciating what i have.

Thanks for letting me get that off my chest.
My life is Ok too, and I see nothing wrong with this answer. If it were not Ok, then I would do my best to change things. What's wrong with being complacent?

My life was difficult before I moved to Arizona in retirement. I knew I had to make a change so I prayed.

Each day I give thanks that I was given the courage to make a long distance move. I feel as if I were guided here. Though I have to be frugal because I'm low income, I appreciate what I have and do my best to support my new community.

Clemencia, do you see yourself in the same place doing the same things in the next year, or three, five or ten years? You are not too old to dream and make those dreams reality!
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Old 06-13-2019, 11:43 AM
 
13,313 posts, read 25,546,272 times
Reputation: 20477
I always have senior dogs, who I adopt. But I still have to have plans for them outliving me, as should we all with pets. I get a lot of seniors from family members of older people who die or move to assisted living or such, and then I get a call "I hear you adopt seniors."
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Old 06-13-2019, 11:58 AM
 
25,971 posts, read 32,970,649 times
Reputation: 32158
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolinaMoon1 View Post
I am retiring in about three months. People are finding out and asking me "what are you going to do next?"

I often feel kind of sheepish about my response, which tends to be "Nothing, nothing, and nothing" because I get the feeling that many people think that retirement means being as productive as our work environments expect us to be.

I'm tired of being productive! I want to be a sloth, at least for a while. And when the spirit moves me, I'll look into taking a guitar class, volunteering at the animal shelter, and taking some day trips. But until then: "nothing, nothing, and nothing."

The freedom to do whatever I feel like (within my limited financial means) goes way beyond "just ok" to me.
LOL. I get it. I will retire in 1027 days. A little less than 3 years. I CANNOT wait. . My plan is to do as little as possible... for about a week or two. But having time to do all the things that I just donít have time for now...that will be SO worth it. I have a very full life - but itís my job that takes up most of my time. I really look forward to getting up ( and going to bed) exactly when I want to. Being able to get my grass cut without rushing and trying to do it in the dark many nights. Taking a whole day to work in my yard would be divine! Sitting out on the deck and reading a book... Iíve not been able to do that in years. And yes, travel. So many places I want to go. And getting in more time at the gym...definitely. Seeing more of my family and friends. And certainly spending a lot more time with my BF ( assuming we are still together!).

I am fairly sure I wonít be bored!
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Old 06-13-2019, 12:13 PM
 
432 posts, read 104,127 times
Reputation: 1027
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolinaMoon1 View Post
I am retiring in about three months. People are finding out and asking me "what are you going to do next?"

I often feel kind of sheepish about my response
, which tends to be "Nothing, nothing, and nothing" because I get the feeling that many people think that retirement means being as productive as our work environments expect us to be.

I'm tired of being productive! I want to be a sloth, at least for a while. And when the spirit moves me, I'll look into taking a guitar class, volunteering at the animal shelter, and taking some day trips. But until then: "nothing, nothing, and nothing."

The freedom to do whatever I feel like (within my limited financial means) goes way beyond "just ok" to me.
Tell them you are going to "sit on the couch in your pajamas eating bon-bons all day."
Say it with a straight face and watch for their reaction
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Old 06-13-2019, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
3,551 posts, read 1,647,282 times
Reputation: 10162
Quote:
Originally Posted by finalmove View Post
I think there's no greater luxury than being able to live contentedly without needing to work.

Nicely said! I need to put this on a sign and put it where I'll see it whenever I need the reminder.
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Old 06-13-2019, 01:30 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,191 posts, read 6,301,958 times
Reputation: 9808
Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQ2015 View Post
Good for the pet people! Why would your brother even want another dog given the circumstances?

I got kittens in 2000 knowing that I wanted to retire around 2015 and figuring the cats might be gone by then. Then took in another cat in 2003 as a favor to a friend. It worked out because my last cat died about a year before retirement. Now I am taking a break from pet ownership because I want to travel. Eventually I would like to adopt a pet but will look at adopting an older pet so it will be less likely to outlive me.
He got the dog for the kids, plus that dog had a big bark, but tiny, defenseless. He should have kept the dog inside the house while heís not home. Other dogs are not as aggressive.
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Old 06-13-2019, 07:51 PM
 
Location: Mammoth Lakes, CA
3,158 posts, read 6,936,742 times
Reputation: 7417
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Fifteen years of retirement and you sum it up as "OK". I think I would feel sad about that.
I would too, but I would assume the OP loved his/her job. For those of us who spent 30 years detesting our working life, retirement is absolute PARADISE.
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Old 06-13-2019, 08:55 PM
 
5,424 posts, read 3,442,945 times
Reputation: 13678
Living life and one's happiness is dependent on so many factors - same for one's happiness in retirement -

one's happiness in retirement can be connected to one's resourcefulness, one's inner life, one's ability to direct time toward things that are rewarding or which are enjoyable, being vitally interested in many things in life......

it's an exercise in being a person who is self-directed, and one who finds life interesting and enjoyable.....

or the opposite, one who is easily bored, has few interests, and perhaps without structure feels lost.

And ability to enjoy simple things (or the grandeur of nature and/or ideas) and not be restless and bored.

And being happy in whatever your relationship (or marital) situation or lack thereof happens to be!

Last edited by matisse12; 06-13-2019 at 09:17 PM..
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Old 06-13-2019, 10:12 PM
 
6,212 posts, read 4,718,283 times
Reputation: 12710
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulysses61 View Post
I would too, but I would assume the OP loved his/her job. For those of us who spent 30 years detesting our working life, retirement is absolute PARADISE.
Just because the OP is not satisfied with retired life does not mean they had a job they loved. In fact, I would bet the opposite is more likely. I bet the working life was just "OK" as well.
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Old 06-13-2019, 10:16 PM
 
6,212 posts, read 4,718,283 times
Reputation: 12710
Quote:
Originally Posted by matisse12 View Post
Living life and one's happiness is dependent on so many factors - same for one's happiness in retirement -

one's happiness in retirement can be connected to one's resourcefulness, one's inner life, one's ability to direct time toward things that are rewarding or which are enjoyable, being vitally interested in many things in life......

it's an exercise in being a person who is self-directed, and one who finds life interesting and enjoyable.....

or the opposite, one who is easily bored, has few interests, and perhaps without structure feels lost.

And ability to enjoy simple things (or the grandeur of nature and/or ideas) and not be restless and bored.

And being happy in whatever your relationship (or marital) situation or lack thereof happens to be!
Very nicely stated.
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