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Old 06-16-2019, 02:59 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
If and when her husband applies, Social Security will check to see if her benefit is greater or less than her spousal benefit under his account. If it is greater, Social Security will switch her to his account, and if not, she'll continue to draw benefits under her own name.
This is incorrect.
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Old 06-16-2019, 02:59 PM
 
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See there is no simple answer ....lol...

But in this case it is pretty simple ...you always get your own benefit,it never switches ..if you qualify you can get a spousal adder on top of your benefit that brings you up to the correct level ..if you file before fra it will always be less then half
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Old 06-16-2019, 03:00 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jessie Mitchell View Post
This is incorrect.
I think we pretty much corrected him on this fact as it is no longer true. Deeming made switching accounts to the higher benefit unnecessary

Last edited by mathjak107; 06-16-2019 at 03:11 PM..
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Old 06-16-2019, 03:37 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
I think we pretty much corrected him on this fact as it is no longer true. Deeming made switching accounts to the higher benefit unnecessary
Yeah... well, he "corrected" me directly, but he was incorrect in his correction of me. So, ya know, I had to set the record straight as the incorrectly corrected party.
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Old 06-16-2019, 10:39 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
There is no more switching accounts for those no longer grandfathered ...your own benefit stays forever as soon as you file regardless of age ... all that happens now is any spousal is added on to your own benefit bringing it up to the correct level ..it can never exceed half the higher benefit..

Deeming now makes switching accounts or taking a separate spousal benefit a thing of the past.... only those who were 62 or older in 2014 can file restricted application and switch accounts as you call it
.

In fact when you get your statement pertaining to getting spousal , even at fra it shows your benefit and the adder being put on top of it so there is no switching..if you have a benefit due you ,your benefit is always paid out regardless of who has the higher one or age filed.

As far as survivor , a widow can take survivor at 60 or their own after 62 ....a widow has a choice of taking survivor or if they have not filed yet they can let their own grow to 70 then switch
This is interesting. Does this mean if a survivor began drawing from their spouse's benefits at FRA that both WEP and GPO would apply? Or is the adder only applicable if the other spouse is still alive?

The information here https://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/ssb/v74n3/v74n3p55.html states "There are eleven possible combinations of paired earnings histories. Each scenario involves a different adjustment to own-work,spouse, or survivor benefits that may or may not be affected by the WEP or the GPO."

In one of the examples it gives for situations where both spouses were entitled to Social Security and government pensions - it states ". If she is widowed, the top-up to her survivor benefit starts with her husband's full benefit (not adjusted for the WEP), minus her own-work benefits, with two-thirds of the pension from her own noncovered work subtracted from the remainder."

So if the husband was not subject to WEP, but the surviving spouse will draw a government pension - would that mean her benefits at FRA would be calculated at:

100% of her husband's benefits minus her own benefits minus two thirds of her government pension?

I am not sure because that situation is not included in the examples - but that almost seems like the "top-up" works as a "top-down" instead, if the widow entitled to her own SS benefits, as well as a government pension, has the amount of her own SS benefits subtracted from the survivor benefit before the GPO offset, where a widow who only had a government pension would not.
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Old 06-17-2019, 12:04 AM
 
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What happens if spouse (husband) takes SS at 72 and wife (who doesn't have enough hours to qualify) take husbands at 62?
I receive about 1/3 of what my husband gets. If he should die, do I stay the same or get his amount?

So confused over all this.
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Old 06-17-2019, 01:15 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by macyny View Post
What happens if spouse (husband) takes SS at 72 and wife (who doesn't have enough hours to qualify) take husbands at 62?
I receive about 1/3 of what my husband gets. If he should die, do I stay the same or get his amount?

So confused over all this.
what happens is the husband loses 2 years of money for no reason ... there is nothing to be gained by waiting until 72 and all those checks to lose....

if he dies and you are 62 you would get survivor .. you would get the higher of what you are getting or you would get his fra amount , not 70 , x.81 . if you waited until your fra to take survivor you get his 70 amount.

big difference . .
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Old 06-17-2019, 01:17 AM
 
71,511 posts, read 71,674,131 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by janja1 View Post
This is interesting. Does this mean if a survivor began drawing from their spouse's benefits at FRA that both WEP and GPO would apply? Or is the adder only applicable if the other spouse is still alive?

The information here https://www.ssa.gov/policy/docs/ssb/v74n3/v74n3p55.html states "There are eleven possible combinations of paired earnings histories. Each scenario involves a different adjustment to own-work,spouse, or survivor benefits that may or may not be affected by the WEP or the GPO."

In one of the examples it gives for situations where both spouses were entitled to Social Security and government pensions - it states ". If she is widowed, the top-up to her survivor benefit starts with her husband's full benefit (not adjusted for the WEP), minus her own-work benefits, with two-thirds of the pension from her own noncovered work subtracted from the remainder."

So if the husband was not subject to WEP, but the surviving spouse will draw a government pension - would that mean her benefits at FRA would be calculated at:

100% of her husband's benefits minus her own benefits minus two thirds of her government pension?

I am not sure because that situation is not included in the examples - but that almost seems like the "top-up" works as a "top-down" instead, if the widow entitled to her own SS benefits, as well as a government pension, has the amount of her own SS benefits subtracted from the survivor benefit before the GPO offset, where a widow who only had a government pension would not.
i have no experience with wep so i know nothing about it
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Old 06-17-2019, 05:17 AM
 
224 posts, read 237,506 times
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Circle up in a straight line in pairs of 3.
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Old 06-17-2019, 08:18 AM
 
8,016 posts, read 7,295,370 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by grlwthprl View Post
I am almost 62. My husband is 63.
If I take my SS at age 62, will I be allowed to 50% of his later on?

Please try to give me a very simple answer (as if you're talking to a 6 year old). I have a Master's Degree but when I post here about SS my head explodes. Thank you.
You get the greater of the survivor benefit for your spouse and your own benefit. If you're getting $20,000 per year from your Social Security retirement benefift when he dies, that is the minimum you will receive. If your share of his benefit is more than $20,000, then you will receive that amount. The two benefits can't be collected at the same time after one of the spouses dies.

benefits when one spouse dies

Last edited by lchoro; 06-17-2019 at 08:28 AM..
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