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Old 06-17-2019, 09:01 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,216 posts, read 6,313,926 times
Reputation: 9827

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You get at least 70% for survivors benefit. But he has to die first.
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Old 06-17-2019, 12:34 PM
 
370 posts, read 107,865 times
Reputation: 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
i have no experience with wep so i know nothing about it
Thanks! I am trying to wade my way through the SSA POMS now, to at least get a general idea of how all the reductions will work together. But as I noticed some people in this forum were very knowledgeable about Social Security, I figured I might as well ask.
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Old 06-17-2019, 12:59 PM
 
Location: Ohio
19,895 posts, read 14,224,806 times
Reputation: 16076
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jessie Mitchell View Post
This is incorrect.
Look, you are all making this much harder than it has to be.

Used to be, a woman would go to Social Security and say, "I want to apply for spousal benefits."

The law says you're not allowed to do that any longer. A woman can certainly go to Social Security and say, "I want to apply for spousal benefits," but Social Security will totally ignore her as though she never even said it.

Some people, mostly women, would apply for spousal benefits at age 62 and let their own benefits accrue, then at full-retirement age or later, up to age 70, apply for their own benefit.

Some thought that was unfair and an abuse of the program and they called it a "loophole."

The law ends that practice.

When a woman (or man) applies for benefits now, she is applying for both spousal benefits and her own benefit and she has no say in the matter at all.

Social Security will calculate the benefit amounts and pay her the greater of the spousal benefit or her own benefit, and that amount is what she'll receive every month until the day she dies, notwithstanding COLA increases or her spouse preceding her in death, in which case she'll be switched to survivor's benefits.

That's all there is to it.

Note that you can only apply for spousal benefits if, and only if, your spouse is currently receiving Social Security benefits. If your spouse is not receiving Social Security benefits, then you are not eligible for spousal benefits.

You become eligible for spousal benefits only when your spouse applies and starts receiving them. When that happens, Social Security will pay you the greater of your benefit or your spousal benefit, and then that's what you get for the rest of your life (notwithstanding COLA increases).

When your spouse dies, you're eligible for survivor's benefits. Social Security will pay you the greater of the survivor benefit or your own benefit, and, yes, there are many times when one's own benefit is greater than the amount of the survivor's benefit.

That's how it works now. It's not rocket science.

The language of Social Security is quite clear:

Under existing law, if you are eligible for benefits both as a retired worker and as a spouse (or divorced spouse) in the first month you want your benefits to begin and are not yet full retirement age, you must apply for both benefits.

I took the liberty of highlight the operand for the not-too-bright.

"If"

If you are not eligible for spousal benefits, then by law, you cannot apply for them. When that benefit does become available to you, then you may apply for it and Social Security will pay you the greater of the spousal benefit or your own benefit.
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Old 06-17-2019, 01:02 PM
 
Location: NJ
10,670 posts, read 21,344,566 times
Reputation: 8828
Quote:
Originally Posted by janja1 View Post
Thanks! I am trying to wade my way through the SSA POMS now, to at least get a general idea of how all the reductions will work together. But as I noticed some people in this forum were very knowledgeable about Social Security, I figured I might as well ask.
Normally I just read but wanted to agree with you. I can't believe they know the ins and outs so well. I've actually given my 62 year old friend the link here because the school system she works for is doing away with her job. I told her to come here to read and join if she has questions. I also suggested she make an appointment at SS to see what they say.
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Old 06-17-2019, 01:04 PM
 
71,511 posts, read 71,674,131 times
Reputation: 49088
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
Look, you are all making this much harder than it has to be.

Used to be, a woman would go to Social Security and say, "I want to apply for spousal benefits."

The law says you're not allowed to do that any longer. A woman can certainly go to Social Security and say, "I want to apply for spousal benefits," but Social Security will totally ignore her as though she never even said it.

Some people, mostly women, would apply for spousal benefits at age 62 and let their own benefits accrue, then at full-retirement age or later, up to age 70, apply for their own benefit.

Some thought that was unfair and an abuse of the program and they called it a "loophole."

The law ends that practice.

When a woman (or man) applies for benefits now, she is applying for both spousal benefits and her own benefit and she has no say in the matter at all.

Social Security will calculate the benefit amounts and pay her the greater of the spousal benefit or her own benefit, and that amount is what she'll receive every month until the day she dies, notwithstanding COLA increases or her spouse preceding her in death, in which case she'll be switched to survivor's benefits.

That's all there is to it.

Note that you can only apply for spousal benefits if, and only if, your spouse is currently receiving Social Security benefits. If your spouse is not receiving Social Security benefits, then you are not eligible for spousal benefits.

You become eligible for spousal benefits only when your spouse applies and starts receiving them. When that happens, Social Security will pay you the greater of your benefit or your spousal benefit, and then that's what you get for the rest of your life (notwithstanding COLA increases).

When your spouse dies, you're eligible for survivor's benefits. Social Security will pay you the greater of the survivor benefit or your own benefit, and, yes, there are many times when one's own benefit is greater than the amount of the survivor's benefit.

That's how it works now. It's not rocket science.

The language of Social Security is quite clear:

Under existing law, if you are eligible for benefits both as a retired worker and as a spouse (or divorced spouse) in the first month you want your benefits to begin and are not yet full retirement age, you must apply for both benefits.

I took the liberty of highlight the operand for the not-too-bright.

"If"

If you are not eligible for spousal benefits, then by law, you cannot apply for them. When that benefit does become available to you, then you may apply for it and Social Security will pay you the greater of the spousal benefit or your own benefit.
seems to me that is just what we said for the most part ....

the only technical correction is you actually do apply for spousal when you file . Essentially, whenever someone is entitled to more than one type of Social Security benefit, they are now automatically "deemed" to apply for all available benefits .In the past, the deeming rules only applied when benefits were claimed before full retirement age

but they don't automatically make the connection for you to your spouse since he may not have filed yet and they don't track when your spouse actually files . so you must contact them and have them make that link for you so you can get what is due you.

you can mail in the ssa2 form and then they just call to ask a few questions . it really is a simple process to activate the spousal .

Last edited by mathjak107; 06-17-2019 at 01:24 PM..
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Old 06-17-2019, 01:11 PM
 
38 posts, read 14,127 times
Reputation: 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
seems to me that is just what we said ....
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Old 06-17-2019, 01:13 PM
 
38 posts, read 14,127 times
Reputation: 178
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mircea View Post
Look, you are all making this much harder than it has to be.
You can say a lot of things about me, but making things "much harder" is not one. I am the queen of making things as simple as they can reasonably be.
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Old 06-17-2019, 01:49 PM
 
370 posts, read 107,865 times
Reputation: 68
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
Normally I just read but wanted to agree with you. I can't believe they know the ins and outs so well. I've actually given my 62 year old friend the link here because the school system she works for is doing away with her job. I told her to come here to read and join if she has questions. I also suggested she make an appointment at SS to see what they say.
I would very much encourage your friend to read some of the forums here. I also plan on going to the Social Security office in the near future - but I also think the more you know before you go can be very helpful - because they don't always get things 100% right there (at least not at my local office). Even if you don't get all the answers by researching a bit, you are in a much better position to know the right questions to ask (which will help them give you the right answers), especially if the situation is a bit complex.
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Old 06-17-2019, 01:51 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,216 posts, read 6,313,926 times
Reputation: 9827
Quote:
Originally Posted by janja1 View Post
I would very much encourage your friend to read some of the forums here. I also plan on going to the Social Security office in the near future - but I also think the more you know before you go can be very helpful - because they don't always get things 100% right there (at least not at my local office). Even if you don't get all the answers by researching a bit, you are in a much better position to know the right questions to ask (which will help them give you the right answers), especially if the situation is a bit complex.
You are correct, they don’t always know locally or not. I called in, armed with information from OpenSocialSecurity and they still told me that was not correct. I knew better, after 30 minutes they finally gave me the correct answer.

Last edited by NewbieHere; 06-17-2019 at 02:37 PM..
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Old 06-17-2019, 01:59 PM
 
71,511 posts, read 71,674,131 times
Reputation: 49088
they can be awful at the ss office . that is why i took the time to learn myself .


want proof ?
https://www.usnews.com/news/national...s-and-widowers
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