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Old 06-18-2019, 03:56 PM
 
6,249 posts, read 4,728,813 times
Reputation: 12819

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Quote:
Originally Posted by craigiri View Post
.......
I heard a POTUS candidate on the radio the other day and he recently had prostate cancer removed. He made certain to tell everyone to go and get checked and get it taken care of.

I immediately thought about the UK and even the USA current "best practices" where the suggestion is to NOT look for it in most cases...that is, those who look....find...and those who find end up as bad or worse than those who don't look!

I immediately thought to myself "this guy is running for POTUS and he's not familiar with what Medicine has been saying about this for a DECADE?????

Not to cast judgement on what he did...but when you tell everyone to do the same, you are not (scientifically and statistically) doing them any favors.

One should at least be informed...themselves...or have a doc who is informed, before subjecting themselves to the Medical-Industrial complex. It's all about the Benjamins and given the choice between making money or not making money, most American medial institutions will follow the first.
No, it is not all about the money. Approximately one out of forty males will die of prostate cancer. I have known several who did and in each case the death was long, slow and painful. Just plain horrible. Some of those who are treated die anyway. Others who are not treated would likely die of another cause before the cancer killed them. There is a system of trying to stage and predict the outcomes but the system is far from perfect.

The decision is yours. Would you rather have a simple, low cost blood test that is highly effective in diagnosing prostate cancer or just take your chances? Would you like to have a test and catch the cancer at an early stage when treatment is likely to be successful? Would you take your chances and avoid treatment even if you knew you had cancer? If you had an aggressive form of the cancer what would you do? My physicians explained all the facts and left the decisions up to me. That is the way medicine is supposed to work and typically does work. Of course that may not work well for those who are paranoid in believing the Medical-Industrial Complex is out to get them.
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Old 06-18-2019, 04:03 PM
 
Location: I live in reality.
1,045 posts, read 959,241 times
Reputation: 1835
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal1542 View Post
I hope this topic does not get moved. I am asking the seniors here, the ones who are most likely to fall in the category of their numbers being too high.

And I am not intending to argue, criticize, offend, etc. I'm just collecting information for my own self.

For a long time I've been told I have high cholesterol/triglycerides, etc. and my doctor has prescribed medication for it. None of them agreed with my system. They didn't really do a lot to reverse the high numbers either. Eventually, the doctor I went to at the time said to stop taking them. And he wouldn't prescribe anything more. I seemed to get along fine, no terrible symptoms, etc. He also said I was borderline diabetic but never prescribed any medication.

I've changed doctors a few times for various reasons. Again, my numbers are high. But I'm not sick. I'm 77 and seem to be doing OK. So this most recent doctor prescribed another medication that was not a statin and had an additional plus of combating diabetes. I decided to take it because I had refused medication before and think the doctor was getting a little upset with me. (Might be just my imagination.) So I took the med, 4 pills a day, 2 in the a.m., 2 in the p.m.

Then the slide started. I found myself getting more and more tired and got to the point I was asleep more than awake. No energy. Had to force myself to get to the store for things I had run out of, nothing I wanted to eat (no energy to cook).

So I stopped taking them. I feel a lot better. I'm awake, I want to do things, why take something that makes me feel half dead?

I should also mention my eye doc put me on a different eye drop to deal with a problem I'm having. So I called him to see what he thought. He didn't think the drop was causing it but said I could cut the dosage in half. He also said he doubted the drop would have that affect on me. The pharmacist agreed with that.

I don't know if anyone had the patience to read this, I know it's too long.

I don't want to live to be 100 but I don't want to hasten death, either.

I just believe there are some of us who are like this.
As a newly retired RN of 40 yrs 'we' (the whole Medical community that you see) are aware that MOST people take their meds and healthcare status like you do. We call you 'the hit or miss gang'. You keep us employed in fairly decent careers that we love and choose to be in. I could write many books about patients creative taking of their meds and the consequences that we have seen over 40 yrs.
That being said, you have made it to 77 yr old....12 more years than I have so far and I take my meds as ordered! What else could you want?
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Old 06-18-2019, 04:52 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,666 posts, read 3,243,341 times
Reputation: 11941
Quote:
Originally Posted by mooksmom View Post
As a newly retired RN of 40 yrs 'we' (the whole Medical community that you see) are aware that MOST people take their meds and healthcare status like you do. We call you 'the hit or miss gang'. You keep us employed in fairly decent careers that we love and choose to be in. I could write many books about patients creative taking of their meds and the consequences that we have seen over 40 yrs.
That being said, you have made it to 77 yr old....12 more years than I have so far and I take my meds as ordered! What else could you want?





It doesn't seem to be what I want, it's more what the doctor wants.

I am not afraid to die. There is no one who will miss me, pretty sure of that. I'm past feeling bad about that. I've had a lot of heart and head aches from my kids.

I'm having a heck of a time with my eyes. Probably will have at least one, possibly two, more surgeries on my right eye. Past few days it has really bothered me, feels glued shut sometime (I never use glue), and hurts.

It seems the rest of my family (all dead now) didn't have wonderful retirements, either. I think it's just how it goes. Some have everything. Some have nothing. I'm somewhere in the low middle.
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Old 06-18-2019, 04:55 PM
 
6,573 posts, read 1,352,342 times
Reputation: 16640
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nanny Goat View Post
They use the prescription bone meds, but they can have bad side effects. I know a few residents where i work who have jaw necrosis from them. The dentist can't do much work without fear of the consequences. I personally wouldn't trade some bone protection for a possibility of jaw necrosis...but that's me. I have a nurse co worker who won't go near them either.

Bone vitamins and minerals, lots to research there of what to take and exercise that stresses the bone, walking, hiking, weights, etc. to help.

Vit. D, but it has to be enough (the doses most people get aren't enough, I've looked at the Vit D council's info and other sites), Calcium (but supplements have heart risks, I eat my calcium) K (possibly, mixed research) and things like zinc, boron and other trace elements. I've read research that magnesium can help, too. Has to be a medley of stuff for the bones.
Thank you SO much for the info!!

I admit that I take my (so far) good health for granted due to my good blood pressure, part-time job in which I am required to lift 40-pound cases of wine and walk an average on one mile per hour. and the fact that three of my four grandparents lived to 92.

However, if I read of something requiring little cost or effort, and with very low risk, that can increase the number of years I have of good health, I am certainly willing to try it!

(I have already decided to substitute a bowl of oatmeal for my husband's breakfast once the weather turns cold again!)
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Old 06-18-2019, 05:13 PM
 
6,249 posts, read 4,728,813 times
Reputation: 12819
Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
.....

(I have already decided to substitute a bowl of oatmeal for my husband's breakfast once the weather turns cold again!)
That is a good idea and much better than the typical breakfast which is often a choice between sugary high carb cereals or bacon/eggs and toast with butter.

Even so do not expect miracles. Oatmeal is of value because it contains soluble fiber which helps reduce LDL cholesterol. It is not better than a lot of other choices for foods with high soluble fiber. Also the effect is likely to be very small in the range of a 5-8% reduction. That is less than lab error or typical daily biological variation.
https://health.clevelandclinic.org/o...l-infographic/
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Old 06-18-2019, 05:15 PM
 
6,249 posts, read 4,728,813 times
Reputation: 12819
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal1542 View Post
[/b]

It doesn't seem to be what I want, it's more what the doctor wants.
....
It seems like your choice of doctors is a major problem. As I remember it you live in an isolated area in central NY. I hope you have options for picking a doc that will work with you. I also hope you know how to pick your doctors.
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Old 06-18-2019, 06:16 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,666 posts, read 3,243,341 times
Reputation: 11941
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
It seems like your choice of doctors is a major problem. As I remember it you live in an isolated area in central NY. I hope you have options for picking a doc that will work with you. I also hope you know how to pick your doctors.



Far from isolated. I live close to Syracuse, NY. Plenty of people, plenty of doctors, plenty of pharmacies.

I have had some bad luck with doctors. They don't all live in the boonies.
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Old 06-18-2019, 06:23 PM
 
6,249 posts, read 4,728,813 times
Reputation: 12819
I have had luck picking doctors and specialists by recommendations from other doctors and specialists. So if you are seeing any specialists you trust you might ask for referrals for a new PCP.
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Old 06-18-2019, 07:48 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,751 posts, read 7,033,290 times
Reputation: 14260
Quote:
Originally Posted by craigiri View Post
I have a friend with all kinds of conditions (a-fib and more) who is over 70 and a super-athlete.

He always ate well and was never overweight. But he was on BP meds and on others.....he decided to get off ALL meds, which is quite a trial when you are over 70.

Without going into detail I'll say that he was successful. BUT, knowing people (in general), I'd say less than 10% of the population is capable of the discipline required to do so. He spent 10's of thousands over the years (of his own money) to have his blood extracted and for an anti-aging doctor who he often had to fly to (1200 miles). He is retired and has the money to do so.

Most people do not have the will, the money, the time, the background (he was into organic food 50 years ago!) and the proper instructions/doctor.

My thinking is that most people are best with a "middle way" of moderation. I take 5mg linisopril for high BP....that's a small dose. But I also exercise, have lost weight and also have had a healthy diet my entire life.

I was just looking up various meds and procedures for some of the normal aging problems - prostate, back, etc.....and, in most cases, the cure was worse than the disease. I have a neighbor who simply listened to the docs and did all the prostate tests and operations and hormone the doc told him to. He went from active to miserable and basically can't do anything except lay around and sleep.

I think I'd rather pass on than go through certain procedures and meds - especially for conditions what virtually 100% of men (or women...if the disease is a typical women one)....will eventually suffer from.

I heard a POTUS candidate on the radio the other day and he recently had prostate cancer removed. He made certain to tell everyone to go and get checked and get it taken care of.

I immediately thought about the UK and even the USA current "best practices" where the suggestion is to NOT look for it in most cases...that is, those who look....find...and those who find end up as bad or worse than those who don't look!

I immediately thought to myself "this guy is running for POTUS and he's not familiar with what Medicine has been saying about this for a DECADE?????

Not to cast judgement on what he did...but when you tell everyone to do the same, you are not (scientifically and statistically) doing them any favors.

One should at least be informed...themselves...or have a doc who is informed, before subjecting themselves to the Medical-Industrial complex. It's all about the Benjamins and given the choice between making money or not making money, most American medial institutions will follow the first.
Thank you for your OPINION.
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Old 06-19-2019, 09:49 AM
Status: "Be yourself. What's the alternative?" (set 19 days ago)
 
8,690 posts, read 10,839,690 times
Reputation: 12744
Quote:
Originally Posted by JOinGA View Post
Per the Mayo Clinic, "Lifestyle changes are essential for reducing your risk of heart disease, whether you take a statin or not." Unfortunately, we live in an age when many people just want a pill to "fix" them without making any other changes. If you do all you can to live a healthy lifestyle and still need meds, that is one thing, but that tends to be the exception rather than the rule.
Really true. Poor lifestyle choices are one of the main reasons of chronic disease. This is a very good article, but long.

https://www.who.int/chp/chronic_dise...n/index18.html
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