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Old 06-22-2019, 06:09 AM
 
12,677 posts, read 14,059,781 times
Reputation: 34728

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Quote:
Originally Posted by tomchard View Post
... Kevxu opined: “You could tell Mom or Dad, but their bottom line was that you delivered the paper, kept your mouth shut, took the money and got the hell away from people like that asap. And that's what you did.”

I recall early-on in childhood, being told by my Dad to “stay th’ hell away from people like that” ... At that time, it didn’t matter what it was that might be unsavory or illegal about them, we did what our parents said to do, or suffered the consequences when they found out — and, they did find out! ...
This was late Forties and very early Fifties, by the way, only the Army Air Force had helicopters, parents did not yet. It was cut and dried with my working class parents: Delivering papers was a business (essentially I worked for the county newspaper.) You do your work, and mind your own business. A drunk woman who puked her guts out was not my business - though had she puked on me the reaction would have been different, I'm sure. A husband slaps his wife, he was a nasty man, but your job: deliver the paper.

If someone had threatened me either directly, or by their conduct, without a doubt my parents would have told the newspaper that I would deliver to that customer, and depending on how hostile or dangerous this theoretical act was my father certainly would have visited the person and/or the police.

You did not get to pick and choose your paper route customers though. When I started working in a drug store at age 14, I did not get to choose the customers either.

Bottom line then: Work and mind your own business while you're there.

There were three principle injunctions in life:

Put your shoulder to the wheel;
tighten your belt;
and don't let the neighbors know.

Last edited by kevxu; 06-22-2019 at 06:47 AM..
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Old 06-22-2019, 06:39 AM
 
12,677 posts, read 14,059,781 times
Reputation: 34728
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
..... No one had a gun and no one would have shot a dog. People were more civilized than that.
I grew up in a small town in the Forties and Fifties. If you visited someone and their dog got excited and bit a kid or adult in excitement, the reaction would have been to put the dog outside and deal with the wound.

But walking a dog at this time in my town was something that was very, very rare, and I can only remember a few very old people walking with small dogs or a mentally impaired man who was given a dog to walk. Otherwise the dog poop in your yard while you watched, or often it was just let out unwatched, sometimes for all day.

If a free-roaming dog bit a kid, there was hell to pay. If it bit more than one person or child the hell would escalate each time and could become a death sentence.

1. You muzzle that dog "or else" from the neighbors.
2. You might report the dog to the police and let them contact the owner, but they got the same order.
3. And the "or else"s that I knew of - a man whose child was bitten beat the large dog with a piece of 2 X 4, and it became a mopey creature that stayed in its owner's yard all the time after that (brain damaged, I might imagine); a dog with a biting habit was enticed into a garage, doped, muzzled and an "or else" taped to it; a dog on my street whose owner ignored many complaints of biting and property damage and did not muzzle the dog (the dog attacked pets as well) was poisoned.
4. As far as shooting dogs, my aunt and her husband had a farm. A neighbor's dog kept harassing his cattle - which affects their milk production. Her husband complained in no uncertain term to his farmer neighbor (who should have understood.) The problem continued. He shot the dog and dumped its body in his woods. End of problem Cows, farm milk production count, attacking dogs don't.

The general attitude was very clear: Children and adults count. Wild animals attack people, if Fido makes unprovoked attacks he is a wild animal.
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Old 06-22-2019, 08:43 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,896 posts, read 1,580,961 times
Reputation: 7908
In the last year I finally stopped listening to any terrestrial radios I own & only use streaming devices over wifi for not only music but also my local radio station. Same for streaming all my own music, as well as what's available on Apple Music streaming over my voice command Alexa speaker. The concept of "owning" music is becoming obsolete.

I only read 1 actual physical magazine now: The New Yorker; everything else including the newspapers I subscribe to is online reading. I stopped watching cable tv years ago & just stream that too from the Internet. No "house phone" either. Wifi is now as indispensable as electricity or plumbing, I just spent a month abroad & for the first time I was totally dependent on my device for maps & directions, guides, tickets, making reservations, phone & video chats, etc., etc... knowing where to find wifi was pretty important.

I question the foods available at the grocery stores now & examine the labels & buy very little that comes in packages or cans, I'm trying to move over to grass-fed, fresh, etc... Not so easy really except at the weekly greenmarket (I suppose I should question the milk I buy at the store for my coffee too.)

The general culture in America seems to have gotten much coarser & meaner, politics was always bad & hasn't improved at all, to be understating it.
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Old 06-22-2019, 09:26 AM
 
Location: Northern Appalachia
5,156 posts, read 6,347,169 times
Reputation: 6022
Quote:
Originally Posted by tomchard View Post
I too delivered newspapers to nearly 100 customers, rain, shine, sleet, or snow ... 8-cents a copy; 48-cents-per-week. Anything like a 2-cent ‘tip’ was welcomed, as were the nickels and dimes. They added-up to enough to be able to afford to travel with my Grandma, to Scotland, one Summer. Over the remainder of the years, I saved enough to be able to buy my first car, albeit a run-down wreck the neighbor lady was replacing. But, I had the sense of accomplishment and well-being, knowing that I was able to save money and purchase things by delaying gratification somewhat ... Today—forget it ... If my oldest Grandson doesn’t get “the best”, or the “most expensive” whatever-it-is, he’s not satisfied/happy.

That’s just a part of what’s changed since the times we were young!

I started delivering papers in 1969. The paper was 7 cents a day, $.42 a week, but many people payed two weeks at a time. It was common for people to wait for their change when they handed you $.85. Now people won't bend over to pick up a penny on the ground.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
And not infrequently where I went to elementary schools ( Catholic), the nuns did at least some of the bullying, of students they didn't like, or whose parents or siblings they didn't like. And generally they did it with impunity.

My mother (born in 1935) used to tell how the nuns discriminated against her and her sisters in Catholic grade school because their parents were divorced. She thought the nuns believed they shouldn't attend Catholic school since the Church did not believe in divorce.


Quote:
Originally Posted by normstad View Post
Took our .22 guns to school in grade seven so we could go shoot gophers in a nearby field in the middle of town. This was mid 1960's. Police would come by, stop, and ask us if we knew not to shoot towards the road, and wished us good luck.

Imagine doing that today?

One of the traditions in my elementary school was bringing one of your Christmas presents to school to show the class. In 6th grade I brought my new Ithaca .22 rifle to school that I go for Christmas. It was 1967.
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Old 06-22-2019, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,223 posts, read 12,483,575 times
Reputation: 19356
Quote:
Originally Posted by Piney Creek View Post
And Mayberry was a much more lively place, with all sorts of stores.

I totally agree that the difference between living in a small town and today's suburban surrounded metro areas has had a cultural impact. Small towns before the 1960s were much more independent places. They had much more distinct personalities than you see these days. Often everyone in town knew you (or knew a few people in your family). That's a big cultural change from today's life in the suburbs where you might not even know the names of many of your neighbors. Also, in the small towns pre-1960 it wasn't that unusual to know people who never really left their town. In modern suburbs it's common to know people who have a house in one suburb, commute to another city for work, drive the kids to yet another one for school, etc. That has an impact on culture, too.

Now that I think about it, we may have had a return to conformity, but it's a different conformity. Instead of the conformity of social customs that you had back before the mid 60s, now you have conformity in suburban design.

Although modern suburbs do have some differences in personality, the reality is most of them look very similar; it can be hard to know when you cross a border from one into another. Even little things like street signs tend to conform (remember when you always knew the moment you drove from one town to the next because the street signs would go from being black and white to blue and yellow, or some other such difference? You still see that in some older suburbs, but not in the newer ones, where they're all the same.). They have the same chain stores, the same (or similar) look, sometimes even the same layout in the civic buildings. In northern Virginia, where I used to live, every time a new elementary school is built, they use the same plans. It's helpful for first responders, because you always know where everything is, but it's a little creepy, too. Stores do the same thing. I recently went to Costco in Newport News. It was identical to the Costco where I used to live. I knew exactly where everything would be, but it's kind of weird. That has to have some sort of effect on culture.
Freeways killed the small town. Once upon a time, the highway went through town and businesses thrived because of it. Before freeways, you saw things like the Bomber Cafe, the Brown Jug Service Station and go-kart tracks for the kids. Every town had a lumber yard, a hardware store, a bank, a butcher, a grocer, and at least a couple taverns. In lots of towns today the taverns are the only thing left. Once you are on the freeway, it's a special trip to go to town.
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Old 06-22-2019, 02:47 PM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,427 posts, read 1,663,961 times
Reputation: 8643
Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
Freeways killed the small town. Once upon a time, the highway went through town and businesses thrived because of it. Before freeways, you saw things like the Bomber Cafe, the Brown Jug Service Station and go-kart tracks for the kids. Every town had a lumber yard, a hardware store, a bank, a butcher, a grocer, and at least a couple taverns. In lots of towns today the taverns are the only thing left. Once you are on the freeway, it's a special trip to go to town.
That’s very true. We vacationed in the Smokies when I was a kid and watched I75 being lengthened every year. While it was fun to eat in these Mom and Pop places, it added a more time to an already too long trip. We were happy to not have to detour into these towns anymore once the interstate was finished.q

As an adult, before gps/internet, we would pull off of I80 in PA to eat only to find the place was literally miles down the road. We learned if we couldn’t see the sign for a place from the road, we weren’t getting off. These were yearly trips back to our hometowns in IN and keeping the trip time as short as possible was the goal, not sight-seeing small town America.
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Old 06-22-2019, 06:25 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
4,361 posts, read 1,657,079 times
Reputation: 7925
My music listening consisted of two choices: The radio, which played the same 40 songs over and over again, or my collection of a dozen LPs which cost a day's wages each. Oh, wait, we had an all-polka station, too.
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Old 06-22-2019, 09:00 PM
 
Location: S.W. Florida
2,206 posts, read 928,712 times
Reputation: 6213
1. A general lack of respect for one another,as well as for authority.
2. A lack of care and concern for others
3. A near total absorbtion of SELF
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Old 06-22-2019, 09:16 PM
 
Location: Whereever we have our RV parked
8,761 posts, read 7,689,871 times
Reputation: 14958
Everything has changed, but not for the better.
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Old 06-22-2019, 11:06 PM
 
Location: southern california
55,634 posts, read 74,577,828 times
Reputation: 48121
Sorry took longer than a moment

Nothing has changed in my 71 years -we all go to the movies and cheer our hero’s -the only difference is the people sitting around me are cheering the —assassins, pirates, gangsters and witches -instead of those who protect us from them
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