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Old 06-23-2019, 12:09 AM
 
10,812 posts, read 8,054,817 times
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I was born in late 1948. The 50's and 60's were NOT good years, culturally or otherwise, for my mom, my brothers, and me. They were wretched in fact. It was a horrible time to be a single mother or the children of a single mother.

Starting ca 1968, when I was in my 20s, things began to take a turn for the better. Took awhile.
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Old 06-23-2019, 07:16 AM
 
Location: Philadelphia, PA
939 posts, read 199,896 times
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American culture is more out in the open crude and lewd than ever before and the obnoxious hip hop/ghetto culture is now mainstream. Both are ugly.
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Old 06-23-2019, 10:40 AM
 
Location: Cochise County, AZ
1,316 posts, read 832,470 times
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Society is more concerned about child safety.

I remember two incidents from my childhood involving our 1957 Pontiac Fire Chief. Mom went into the grocery store and left us in the car. My older brother climbed into the front seat, pretended to drive the car, and somehow managed to shift the gears. Car rolled down a slight incline and hit the car in front of us. Boy was she mad!

The second one was of my younger brother being in the back seat. He was under two-years-old and stood between us looking out the back window. Mom usually put him in the car seat (image of similar car seat). On this day, it was folded up on the rear floor. Mom slammed on her brakes, my younger brother went flying and landed on the floor. He connected with the metal on the bottom of the car seat. He still has a scar on his forehead from where he got stitches. Very lucky it wasn't an eye!
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Old 06-23-2019, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,541 posts, read 17,525,434 times
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Smoking is another one.

When I was growing up in the 1990s, smoking in public was commonplace. My area is still behind the times on this, but it has changed dramatically over the past couple of decades or so.
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Old 06-23-2019, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,223 posts, read 12,483,575 times
Reputation: 19356
Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
My music listening consisted of two choices: The radio, which played the same 40 songs over and over again, or my collection of a dozen LPs which cost a day's wages each. Oh, wait, we had an all-polka station, too.
I was a graveyard engineer on an AM top 40 radio station in the '60s. The music drove me crazy. With artists like Cream and Joni Mitchell available, I was pounded with "Sugar Sugar" and "Yummy Yummy Yummy I've Got Love In My Tummy." I couldn't even get them to add Procol Harum to the playlist.

They had a 100,000 watt FM transmitter that played automated elevator music. KFLY in Corvallis. I pitched "K-FLY, flying underground" to the station owner, be he wanted none of it.

I quit.
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Old 06-24-2019, 03:58 AM
 
12,677 posts, read 14,059,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by villageidiot1 View Post
I think the pace of change keeps accelerating and will continue to accelerate into the future. Look at cellphone and internet technology and how they have changed our culture in the past 20 years. They had much more an impact than anything in earlier time spans. For example, how much did television, telephone, or computer technology change in the 1960 to 1980 time frame?
I agree with the main point above.

But as for the final sentence, I have a somewhat different opinion. I worked in a computer center during the latter part of 1960 - 80 period. The technology did change, but the consumers on the whole were businesses and institutions; however, those of us that worked in these environments were something like the "kindergarten" of the eventual home and personal consumer of the retail tech. And by the early 80s you were getting the emergence of what would become the internet, except - of course - you had to have access to a machine...and that essentially meant working for a big firm.

Television technology? All I can recall is that sets got more portable. But the big change was in content during that era.
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Old 06-24-2019, 04:58 AM
 
12,677 posts, read 14,059,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
I was a graveyard engineer on an AM top 40 radio station in the '60s. The music drove me crazy. With artists like Cream and Joni Mitchell available, I was pounded with "Sugar Sugar" and "Yummy Yummy Yummy I've Got Love In My Tummy." I couldn't even get them to add Procol Harum to the playlist.

They had a 100,000 watt FM transmitter that played automated elevator music. KFLY in Corvallis. I pitched "K-FLY, flying underground" to the station owner, be he wanted none of it.

I quit.
I am with you, but from a consumer angle. I grew up about forty miles from Buffalo, NY in the Forties and Fifties. TV gave us the Lucky Strike Hit Parade, and much of the music in the post-WW II era and early Fifties was just a conventional offspring of Thirties music.

In 1955 George "Hound Dog" Lorenz, a DJ who'd been playing R&B on a small daylight station, WJJL, in Niagara Falls, NY moved to 50,000 watt WKBW in Buffalo, and premiered live with Clyde McPhatter and Ruth Brown from the racially mixed Zanzibar Lounge. I had been a religiously dedicated white listener since his Niagara Falls days. Lorenz was one of the first white DJ's to play what had until 1949 been called "race music" - now Rhythm n Blues - full time on his shows. At night his new station could sometimes be heard as far as Tennessee.

Alan Freed moved to WINS in New York City in '54, he had been playing at a Cleveland station since '51 aiming the same type of music to a wider white audience as well. He is given credit for popularizing the moniker Rock n Roll for the new-to-whites music...the term had originally meant a hot session in the sack. And this was the year that Elvis appeared on the airwaves singing Arthur Crudup's song That's All Right, Mama.

R&B and rock and roll were twisting the tail of the pop music industry. It is difficult today to imagine the intensity with which many white teenagers responded to these first DJ's. When I heard people like Big Mama Thorton and Arthur Crudup, Hit Parade in any form vaporized. Parents, schools, clergymen, politicians and a legion of self-appointed social commentators would be blaming this music for every problem associated with young people. Record companies frantically looked for white performers to do acceptable versions of this music....Pat Boone to do covers of Little Richard, Georgia Gibbs for LaVerne Baker....OMG ROTFLMAO. Big Joe Turner put out the raunchily sexual Shake, Rattle and Roll in 1954, and it was immediately followed by a cleaned-up verson by Bill Haley and the Comets. Soooooooo, pathetic compared to raw, hot originals.

And then, as Larry wrote in the quote above, came AM Top 40 radio, the delight of the suburbs. Music designed to give Rhythm n Blues loving kids of the Fifties acid reflux and diabetes in one listening session. Panicked for our musical health, lots of us fled to the big cities and bars and clubs that played soul, Motown, funk....and later in my sixties and seventies to Brazilian forro, Luso-African pop and West and South African pop....and those old hangers-on in New Orleans.
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Old 06-24-2019, 06:43 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
3,551 posts, read 1,647,282 times
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^^^ Not only the type of music changed, but the importance given to music was certainly a cultural shift that took place in the mid 60s.

Music has always defined a generation, but in the 60s and 70s it was something more. It became more like the air that we breathe. It was not only important to listen to albums over and over, the lyrics also had an impressive impact on people. It was so important to us that we'd spend hours arranging albums in certain orders on our shelves (and god forbid someone put one back out of order! LOL) The lyrics influenced how we thought and important decisions that we made. I'll bet many of us can't remember the names of politicians we voted for or what their platforms were, but we can quote political ideas that we heard on albums. We listened to albums over and over, often debating them with our friends until the wee hours of the morning. It became a budget item in personal finances (for many people). For many, a concert tour dictated vacation choices (or for some people a reason to quit jobs). People actually considered the music scene as a reason to move to a new city. Maybe not the only reason, but a factor to consider. People would refuse to date people because of their taste in music, and the biggest fights in breakups would be over splitting up the albums.

Talk about something shaping the culture of that time! Even to this day, people who lived during the 60s and 70s can recite all the words to hundreds of songs, even ones they haven't heard for 50 years.

Last edited by Piney Creek; 06-24-2019 at 06:52 AM..
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Old 06-24-2019, 09:36 AM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
10,511 posts, read 8,751,470 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
Yeah, I just hope we don't end up like Custer!
Dead? Yes.
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Old 06-24-2019, 09:36 AM
 
12,677 posts, read 14,059,781 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Piney Creek View Post
^^^ Not only the type of music changed, but the importance given to music was certainly a cultural shift that took place in the mid 60s.

Music has always defined a generation, but in the 60s and 70s it was something more. It became more like the air that we breathe. ....

Talk about something shaping the culture of that time! Even to this day, people who lived during the 60s and 70s can recite all the words to hundreds of songs, even ones they haven't heard for 50 years.
That was reflected in my experience in the Sixties, but in a "flip-side" way. I sort of kidded when I said those of us who did not like what in the Sixties became known as Rock, rather than Rock n Roll, fled to the cities. We would have gone there anyway, of course. But my early pay did not permit me to live in a "good" neighborhood, so I lived in a mishmash neighborhood that ran the gamut of tired streets to dangerous slum, and was a mixture of Latinos, older white residents from earlier days and an influx of young white men and woman who were in lousy paying entry level jobs or worked at lower level jobs because of lack of education, etc.

One quiet bar was in more or less safe pocket and attracted mostly young whites and Latinos. Our tastes ran to the grittier black music, but the bar manager, Denny - about ten, fifteen years older than many of his customers - was having none of it. He liked Thirties and Forties music from older groups, and did accommodate himself the the new type of Top 40 Music. But nothing else at all, no matter if even his favorite customers wanted it - No. Finally after two, three years about three records strong on rhythm and up front lyrics appeared on the juke, one as I recall was an early Aretha. Denny loathed them, but for the customers it was water in a desert...until Denny would hit the reject button. He was the soul of pleasantness, but implacable.

A block up the street on the other side a new place opened in a renovated store, as I recall. So, of course, everyone checked it out. What the !!!!. More than two thirds of the records on the box were by black singers or groups and they were all old R n B, soul, Motown...the rest were a mixture of show tunes, some jazz. And behind the bar was Lucky, a white guy with the smile and eyes of a dangerous reptile....but when he filled the box he already knew that the crowd just down the street wanted what he wanted....not a Top 40 on the box. And he managed to quickly reduce that section of the big juke box for "Other" to about ten songs at the lower right of the selection menu - juke box limbo.

His joint was packed for a few years and rolled well into the Seventies....cranked up the volume, allowed grass to be smoked in the bar, and Sister Sledge was his idea of comfort music. Lucky had wrecked the bar down the street, it became a refuge for heavy drinkers who wanted quiet. Until he got over-confident and turned the management over to one of the bartenders.

Whoops, the old bar down the street was gutted, enlarged wired for more sound than Madison Square Garden...and it played the new hot music. Lucky's bartenders had let the grass grow over their ears, and the new version of the old bar was pulling in people even from outside the neighborhood....but who heard of the place in the little (often illegal) dance bars they went to after hours in other parts of the city. The "house music" of Chicago's Frankie Knuckles was across the avenue now. [Lucky went on to other music bar ventures in other areas, which catered to tastes not all musical. His luck ran out when he was carved up into literal pieces in his last establishment by early morning visitors who had no interest in the lucre he was counting and left the bloody stuff on floor.]

None of the type of music that Larry Caldwell didn't like got a hearing in my old neighborhood - except during what was the end of Denny's reign in the first bar, and it helped kill the bar. But the popularity of the bars which succeeded it (and more popped in the neighborhood) were in not small part based on who wanted to hear what, and sometimes the differences were sliced pretty thing. But as Piney wrote, they mattered! And they mattered just as much in this stream that ran parallel to the music he wrote about (#118). Oh, gawd, how they mattered.
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