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Old 06-24-2019, 11:32 AM
 
Location: Florida and New England
1,231 posts, read 1,416,614 times
Reputation: 1671

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Larry Caldwell View Post
They had a 100,000 watt FM transmitter that played automated elevator music.
Lolz -- made me remember a station down the Cape in the 1990s that *still* had the Percy Faith Orchestra Theme from "A Summer Place" on heavy rotation. I sometimes miss the "Easy Listening" format -- my mother would have that playing softly in the house all day long.

I worked the graveyard shift in the 1980s for a private, classical FM station in the rural midwest. This was before public radio took over the classical radio world. I am still amazed at how many people out in the sticks would phone during the night to request an obscure piece by Bruckner or Saint-Saens.
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Old 06-24-2019, 11:57 AM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,233 posts, read 12,491,644 times
Reputation: 19379
Current music is back in the clutches of Top 40 garbage, and we are back to searching for indie musicians who actually know how to create art. Even truly talented artists like Beyonce have been consumed by the production value crap machine that is mass media music today. Examples? Here's Beyonce.

Who run the world?(Girls)
Who run the world?(Girls)
Who run the world?(Girls)
Who run the world?(Girls)
Who run the world?(Girls)
Who run this motha?(Girls)
Who run this motha?(Girls)
Who run this motha?(Girls)
Who run this motha?(Girls)
Who run the world?(Girls)
Who run the world?(Girls)
Who run the world?(Girls)
Who run the world?(Girls)

Here's a cut from Joni Mitchell's first album.

Peridots and periwinkle blue medallions
Gilded galleons spilled across the ocean floor
Treasure somewhere in the sea and he will find where
Never mind their questions there's no answer for
The roll of the harbor wake
The songs that the rigging makes
The taste of the spray he takes
And he learns to give
He aches and he learns to live
He stakes all his silver
On a promise to be free
Mermaids live in colonies
All his sea dreams come to me

You never heard that one on AM radio, did you?

It's hard to find creative new music. I have a friend who does a show called Papa Dukie's Blues every Friday night on KMUZ (check it out). That's a small, local, subscriber and internet station. Most of what he plays is old stuff, sometimes from the beginning of recorded music, sometimes more modern. BTW, the station is pre-empting the whole day of programming on July 2 for live coverage of the Portland Waterfront Blues Festival. After Katrina, a lot of NOLA blues musicians found a warm welcome in Portland. When they went home, they left a revitalized local blues scene. Check it out.

Quote:
Remember when the music
Came from wooden boxes strung with silver wire
And as we sang the words, it would set our minds on fire,
For we believed in things, and so we'd sing.
- Harry Chapin
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Old 06-24-2019, 12:13 PM
 
Location: The South
5,214 posts, read 3,630,568 times
Reputation: 7897
Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
This is a "just for fun" trip down Memory Lane, and was prompted by another thread on another forum. I'll start, and the following refers what I personally experienced in the lower middle class communities I lived in during the 1960's. (I do realize that not everyone will have had the same experience I did!)

1. Showers and kids' birthday parties were inexpensive and very simple. Children's birthday parties consisted of just cake and ice cream and games of the"Pin the Tail on the Donkey" variety, and there were no goodie bags.(!) Showers also had just cake and coffee for refreshments, and games were those like cutting a ribbon to guess the girth of the mom-to-be or memory-type games that required no expenditure whatsoever. These parties were personal and fun and not meant to impress anyone.

2. Company Christmas parties were fairly extravagant (and, yes, it was Christmas parties back then and not holiday parties), and almost everyone received a Christmas bonus. (When I was a teen, even the owners of the small Mom and Pop sub shop where I worked hosted a Christmas party for their employees, and even us teenage part-timers received a $10.00 bonus, which was about six times our hourly wage back then, and it was very much appreciated.)

3. Babysitting was done by girls as young as 11 years old (and no, none of us had American Red Cross certification). Standard rate in my area in the mid-to-late 1960's was 50 cents an hour.

4. A child hardly ever heard the "f-bomb" in public -- I personally never heard that word until I was in my mid-teens -- and most mid-60's TV sit-coms did not even hint at the act of sexual intercourse. (In 1968, "Romeo and Juliet" was almost scandalous because Olivia Hussey very briefly flashed her breasts and there was about a five-second view of Leonard Whiting's bare bottom. I saw it with my 10th grade English class, but many of my classmates' parents refused to give permission for their children to see it.)

5. High school students at least pretended to respect their teachers; and no one I knew worried about, or even thought about, school safety except during fire drills. Female teachers wore skirts, and male teachers wore suits.


What else can you add from your own personal experience?
I went hunting for squirrels and rabbits when I was 10 years old, ALONE. I rode my bike to the hunting area with my .22 rifle across the handlebars and no one called the police. I also dressed and ate what I killed. This was in the late 40’s .
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Old 06-24-2019, 01:32 PM
 
Location: Squirrel Tree
1,201 posts, read 263,093 times
Reputation: 483
Quote:
Originally Posted by Southern man View Post
I went hunting for squirrels and rabbits when I was 10 years old, ALONE. I rode my bike to the hunting area with my .22 rifle across the handlebars and no one called the police. I also dressed and ate what I killed. This was in the late 40ís .
I think its illegal to hunt squirrels and rabbits in the modern day because they're considered a pet.
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Old 06-24-2019, 02:15 PM
 
3,605 posts, read 1,556,409 times
Reputation: 2524
Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
This is a "just for fun" trip down Memory Lane, and was prompted by another thread on another forum. I'll start, and the following refers what I personally experienced in the lower middle class communities I lived in during the 1960's. (I do realize that not everyone will have had the same experience I did!)

1. Showers and kids' birthday parties were inexpensive and very simple. Children's birthday parties consisted of just cake and ice cream and games of the"Pin the Tail on the Donkey" variety, and there were no goodie bags.(!) Showers also had just cake and coffee for refreshments, and games were those like cutting a ribbon to guess the girth of the mom-to-be or memory-type games that required no expenditure whatsoever. These parties were personal and fun and not meant to impress anyone.

2. Company Christmas parties were fairly extravagant (and, yes, it was Christmas parties back then and not holiday parties), and almost everyone received a Christmas bonus. (When I was a teen, even the owners of the small Mom and Pop sub shop where I worked hosted a Christmas party for their employees, and even us teenage part-timers received a $10.00 bonus, which was about six times our hourly wage back then, and it was very much appreciated.)

3. Babysitting was done by girls as young as 11 years old (and no, none of us had American Red Cross certification). Standard rate in my area in the mid-to-late 1960's was 50 cents an hour.

4. A child hardly ever heard the "f-bomb" in public -- I personally never heard that word until I was in my mid-teens -- and most mid-60's TV sit-coms did not even hint at the act of sexual intercourse. (In 1968, "Romeo and Juliet" was almost scandalous because Olivia Hussey very briefly flashed her breasts and there was about a five-second view of Leonard Whiting's bare bottom. I saw it with my 10th grade English class, but many of my classmates' parents refused to give permission for their children to see it.)

5. High school students at least pretended to respect their teachers; and no one I knew worried about, or even thought about, school safety except during fire drills. Female teachers wore skirts, and male teachers wore suits.


What else can you add from your own personal experience?
Did you leave the kids to eat and play in others houses?

Were people selling used , clothes, shoes or did they donate them?

And what about children outside of marriage? Wete they rare too?
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Old 06-24-2019, 02:57 PM
 
8,886 posts, read 2,756,449 times
Reputation: 5438
Quote:
Originally Posted by numsgal View Post
Duck and cover. I don't think these last couple of generations understand the fear that could generate in young children. That's why the first version of Red Dawn did so well. The Russians and Cubans taking over the U.S. was a real life threat. There was no similar fear to use in the remake.
We had that too. I remember hiding under my desk when the teacher rang her bell. Like that would save us. God help us.
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Old 06-24-2019, 03:13 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,662 posts, read 3,239,300 times
Reputation: 11927
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatsquirrel View Post
I think its illegal to hunt squirrels and rabbits in the modern day because they're considered a pet.



I'm pretty sure they are considered food in some areas.
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Old 06-24-2019, 03:15 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,662 posts, read 3,239,300 times
Reputation: 11927
In regard to all the posts about music, thank you.
Great stroll down memory lane.
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Old 06-24-2019, 03:35 PM
 
Location: Pueblo area
211 posts, read 121,406 times
Reputation: 473
Secretaries.

Today, the CEO and everyone else uses Word to type, spell check and email their own memos.
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Old 06-24-2019, 03:37 PM
 
Location: Washington state
5,436 posts, read 2,759,563 times
Reputation: 16345
We had phones that still used dials. Today's generation couldn't tell you how to operate them. But of course, in the 40s, there were operators we had to dial to make a call.

Cars had window wells and no computers to run them. And how many people under 30 can drive stick shift today? People learned to unfold and read a map.

And the music of the 60s and 70s! It took me forty years to get to it, but I started collecting all my old songs again that I hadn't heard since the early 70s. Deep Water Reunion, Gypsy, John Prine, Laura Nyro, and on and on. And I now have a collection of home burned quality CDs that I play all the time. I don't have to have nostalgia for the music because I have it with me now. It was always a part of me. It just took me this long to realize it.

I will say, though, whenever I listen to a good song on YouTube, the comments from from younger people are very encouraging. Many of them wish they had been alive to experience the music then and many of them say how much better the music was the than what passes for music now. And so many parents have played that old music for their kids while they were growing up. I'd say a whole new generation has fallen for it all over again, which I think is awesome.
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