U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-21-2019, 11:27 AM
 
5,424 posts, read 3,440,673 times
Reputation: 13676

Advertisements

What does one very small group/subset - lawyers- have to do with the vast majority and beyond the vast majority who enjoy retirement or love retirement, and who have absolutely little to no problem 'adjusting to retirement'.

And the vast majority of people who enjoy keeping their own schedule in life in retirement and the freedom of retirement and the freedom from a lifetime of work.

I worked in law firms for 23 years. Big deal that some lawyers enjoy their profession and like working into their 70's. I saw that too for some lawyers. Some doctors are similar, as are some university professors, as are some politicians. A few professionals like working into their 70's and are allowed to - some by being given an individual office space to hang out in too.

That doesn't negate that the vast majority of people enjoy retirement or love retirement, and have little to no problem 'adjusting to retirement'.

Last edited by matisse12; 06-21-2019 at 12:06 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-21-2019, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Williamsburg, VA
3,551 posts, read 1,647,282 times
Reputation: 10162
Quote:
Originally Posted by N.Cal View Post
The ones I know aren’t crying. They happily continue to work, into their 70s and beyond, loving coming into the office and doing what they love and mentoring the young ones too. We are talking a certain subset of retirees. If that isn’t you - whatever. No need to get your knicks in a wad.

If Fran had said something like this, I'd have agreed with her. I also know people who love their jobs and happily keep working into their 70s, and sometimes beyond. I think that's awesome. It's good to see people who have found a career that makes them happy, and then see them continue to do that thing.

The difference between you and Fran is you're willing to acknowledge this is a subset of people. And, you can acknowledging that other people have different experiences. Whereas Fran is trying to claim that anyone who thinks differently from her is being dishonest with themselves. That's not only incorrect, it's also not a healthy way to think. One thing you can count on with this forum, if we see someone saying something that seems unhealthy, people will speak up and point it out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2019, 12:36 PM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,768 posts, read 4,822,990 times
Reputation: 19387
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fran66 View Post
Great post. However, if a retiree "can go back to work at whatever job (we) like" -- probably not. People in their 40s and 50s are having a rough time getting any job. Age discrimination is rampant. Also, we can do whatever we can imagine -- IF we have the money, and the majority of us don't. HOWEVER, I do believe that even with money (and if we're fairly healthy) we can find a way if we really want to do it -- "where there is a will, there is a way".
Yes, and there are ways that don't cost a lot if you are willing to be adventurous or try new things. It's not for everyone, and that's fine. There are inexpensive ways to travel. There are many foreign destinations for budget retirements. In most places you can find something available if you are willing to downsize or possibly do a home share with another retiree. Obviously high COL destinations are for visiting and not living full-time unless you can find a granny flat or studio unit for a reasonable price. No, we can't live like millionaires if we're not, but we can do a lot more than many people assume.

When I said you can go back to work at whatever job we like, I meant possibly trying something really different from your regular job, like my drummer friend, or creating a job, like my friend with the assistance dogs. He created that job, from thin air. He had an idea, researched, did (and does) fundraising, found volunteers, started small, and grew it from the ground up. Like him, others can follow their avocation and create small businesses, I know many that have. People who love animals can be petsitters, or take grooming classes and start their own grooming business. People who paint can start a mural business. I know a lady that loves to bake, and decorates special occasion cakes. I know someone who makes granola and pies, and sells them at the local farmers' market. I know others who do woodworking for toys for tots (doesn't pay, but personally rewarding), and others that sell their woodworking creations or do custom work. One lady in the neighborhood bought a laser cutter and a plasma cutter and makes custom personalized products for people in the area. She has her own Etsy site and sells on Facebook too. I know folks that love gardening and working with herbs, and they have created small businesses making soaps and beauty products, and selling their herbs and products on-line and at farmers' markets and craft fairs. I could create my own job tomorrow in my old field if I wanted to work as a consultant, and I'm sure others could do so too. Age discrimination may be rampant, but when you're working because you want to and don't need to, you have the luxury of taking your time to find a position. Maybe not with your old employer, but a lawyer could do pro bono work, or take work on contingency, or for worthy causes who can't afford a big firm. An accountant could do tax work in the season, etc. This is what I'm talking about.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2019, 12:52 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
14,217 posts, read 44,870,326 times
Reputation: 12787
Quote:
Originally Posted by N.Cal View Post
Actually, In the legal field, esspecially in multinational large corporate law, in my experience I would say that Fran is pretty much spot on.

I guess it depends on what else one can do besides law. If law has been your whole life, and I don't see age as being a negative for a lawyer or judge - maybe just cut your schedule back a bit, but, hey, if that's what you like to do, and you don't have other hobbies that you can't do as much as you would like due to work schedules - why not?


I'm in the last few years of a great job, engineering rather than law, and, yeah, I do enjoy being "that guy" with massive experience that can mentor the "kids" who are just getting started. But I do have old car projects, more shooting, fishing, and hunting, plus hitting the gym more days a week and for hours at a time if I want, that I want to do when I retire.



I expect to enjoy retirement, but not just yet.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-21-2019, 01:18 PM
 
6,212 posts, read 4,715,040 times
Reputation: 12705
There are indeed careers where people get sucked in and the job becomes their life. That is even more likely after the predicted first or second divorce. It seems that some of those people are judges, doctors and independent business people who have built successful businesses from nothing. There also tends to be a similarity in these situations. The individuals often have god-like powers and god complexes to match. I have worked for a few such individuals. Their job may have been a substitute for family and other interests for them but it was h*ll for the rest of us.

Many of us have had successful and very demanding careers. When it is time to move on it can be important to have other interests and goals outside of the old career. Many of us enjoyed working with our coworkers and often develop friendships. Typically they are not life long friendships and they tend to dissolve when people leave the workplace. Those friendships are often very muted to avoid the frequent favoritism, rivalries and negative interpersonal relationships which are all too common in the workplace.

The vast majority of people I know achieve a level of balance in their lives. Their lives are not totally involved in work. They have outside interests. They have friends and family outside of work and do not use the work "friends" as a substitute.

Some people do manage to work themselves into an emotional corner. When that involves misery and crying daily for months and years, it has progressed to depression and needs some professional help. It is also time to speak out and disagree when someone in that corner believes it is normal and others are lying when they do not admit to it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2019, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia/South Jersey area
2,869 posts, read 1,399,615 times
Reputation: 10071
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeelaMonster View Post
Eliza, I am sorry for your losses. Like you, I have seen several deaths recently that serve as wake up calls. And also like you, the end (of our work lives) is in sight.... apparently on the same day!

But can I ask... what is "OMY syndrome?"
One more year!! thanks for the condolences.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-22-2019, 01:29 PM
 
Location: Philadelphia/South Jersey area
2,869 posts, read 1,399,615 times
Reputation: 10071
Quote:
Originally Posted by RationalExpectations View Post
I understand your point, but it really did get them something: financial peace of mind through their final breath.
I think the problem for me is that to what cost? I mean we blow through many a year of enjoying life because we pathologically afraid that when we are old we'll be homeless.

I think of all the things we "didn't" do because we needed to save, not that I wanted to go living la vida loca but it would have been nice to take a trip without trying to figure out how it will come back and bite us in our old age.

and the thing that really pisses me off is that ok now that I'm financially fit, oh wait don't relax yet because now the new stress is whether or not I'll be able to afford a nursing home.

lol so our society has actually come up with a new way to not have financial peace.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-23-2019, 08:58 AM
 
2,136 posts, read 524,377 times
Reputation: 3724
Quote:
Originally Posted by eliza61nyc View Post
I think the problem for me is that to what cost? I mean we blow through many a year of enjoying life because we pathologically afraid that when we are old we'll be homeless.

I think of all the things we "didn't" do because we needed to save, not that I wanted to go living la vida loca but it would have been nice to take a trip without trying to figure out how it will come back and bite us in our old age.

and the thing that really pisses me off is that ok now that I'm financially fit, oh wait don't relax yet because now the new stress is whether or not I'll be able to afford a nursing home.

lol so our society has actually come up with a new way to not have financial peace.
All very valid points, of course. Each of us needs to find some balance between consuming today and saving for tomorrow.

An example regarding balance: we had dinner last night with good friends who are financially comfortable in retirement. He is careful with his money, but spends it on things he truly values. At 72, he is an avid bicyclist in the summer months (he just finished a 100-mile ride). His main road bike is well over $10,000 -- mine is a couple hundred bucks from Costco. We both are avid downhill skiers with over a million vertical feet on the ski slopes this past winter; he has a few pair of older skis that are at value price points ("Toyotas"); my quiver of skis include exotic hand-made race-shop and extreme condition skis ("Ferraris") and is periodically refreshed with new models.

Part of it is understanding your own gene pool. That friend I mention in the above paragraph - both his parents are alive and in their mid-90s and still live in their own home. His mom & dad are considering moving into a senior independent living facility where there is communal dining and other such things because most all of their friends have died off and they want more social interaction. The place they are looking at is $9200 per month (might have been $9800 - it was a noisy restaurant), and can fund it for a 7 or 8 years by selling their California house. While his mom has had a few health issues of late (she's 94), his dad appears healthy as a horse (he's 95) and manages all his own financial affairs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-23-2019, 02:21 PM
 
256 posts, read 64,766 times
Reputation: 612
I retired at 58 and became bored despite volunteering,etc. Then I had a chance to teach a online college course and loved it. I did it for 6 years until a new dean decided to fire all the part time people and hire full time only. I was asked to apply for a full time job but it’s too much at 65. I really miss the class and feel a bit lost without it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top