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Old 06-29-2019, 10:26 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,778 posts, read 7,063,873 times
Reputation: 14355

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ted Bear View Post
How many time do people have to hear from public service announcements that the SS Admin and the IRS will NEVER contact you by phone? They will ALWAYS send you a letter.


Maybe I am nave and will get my clock cleaned one day, but I really question the intelligence of people who get scammed. It is like they are intentionally being dumb, or at least not using their brains.
In some scams (as in lottery scams) it's greed, and a suspension of common sense, I don't think so in these cases. But I wonder if with some people a mere mention or implied threat coming from an alleged guv'mint agency such as the SSA, IRS, is enough to make them afraid enough to suspend all reason or common sense and go right along with whatever the scam caller instructs them to do. This might be true especially if a person has had some issues with say, the IRS, in the past.

Or perhaps pure naivety on the part of some just makes it impossible for them to believe that others might pull such scams on an unsuspecting public, so these calls must be real. And I must admit the scammers are excellent at making their "schtick" look real.

But the guv'mint doing business using gift cards? That'd be a big red flag issue for me even if I fell for everything else.
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Old 06-29-2019, 10:45 AM
 
Location: OH>IL>CO>CT
5,255 posts, read 8,438,675 times
Reputation: 7230
Quote:
Originally Posted by nancymyers2000 View Post
Agreed, but many people on here insist that SSA NEVER calls, with exclamation points and bolding and all sorts of things and I just want people to understand that is not true. They do indeed call and you will need to speak with them in order to get your benefits approved. And in my post I said "when you sign up for benefits".
Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I've never had the SSA call me to verify information. I get a letter saying I need to call them.
SS called me when I switched from Survivors to my own Retirement benefit (with DRCs) at age 70. The on-line application for the switch advised me to expect a call to verify the application.
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Old 06-29-2019, 10:49 AM
 
Location: FW, Indiander
830 posts, read 1,301,662 times
Reputation: 712
I've gotten these calls before. Messages that threatened to have me arrested, the whole shabang. Called back and reached some Indian(or Arabic) guy. Was testing him about to ask some questions; not giving him my last name. He soon asked if my last name was A-hole. So I said "yep this is a scam go F yourself" and hung up. Haven't set up my voicemail yet for my new phone so I wouldn't have to hear these annoying messages.
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Old 06-30-2019, 06:09 AM
 
29,837 posts, read 34,918,975 times
Reputation: 11752
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
Your routing number is on every check you write. And it's specific to that financial institution, not your account, although your account number is also on every check you write. I can't believe your bank advised you to close your account. That makes no sense at all. If a check I've written is stolen or otherwise lost, all I have to do is go online and put a stop payment that check. There is absolutely no need to close the entire account.
Then you do what you want and others what they want. What is the reason why? Maximum safety at no cost and or inconvenience. Perhaps a deciding factor for people is the amount of money they have at risk at any point in the month etc. Again allow others to practice what they consider to be appropriate and not what you do.
Routing numbers also get used with other financial institutions and depending on the sophistication of the bad guys. The bank contacted brokerage houses etc to update their information along with pension and SS. Nothing missed a beat and money transfers in the last week seamless. This was especially important with brokerage accounts. again it is a personal/situational decision and perhaps ours differs from yours.
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Old 06-30-2019, 06:10 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,372 posts, read 6,390,348 times
Reputation: 9967
They used to tell us to post our SS on our check also. In fact the IRS people still do.
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Old 06-30-2019, 06:23 AM
 
Location: Washington State
18,687 posts, read 9,647,068 times
Reputation: 15921
Quote:
Originally Posted by PartIrish View Post
Some friends of ours who are in their early 70s visited us this week and told us of a sad thing that happened to the husband's older brother. His brother, a retired college professor, got a call that purported to be from Social Security (caller ID said Social Sec.) and they told the man that his Social Security account had been compromised and all his money, including money in his financial accounts, was at risk. They convinced him to provide his account details so that SS could keep his money safe. The scammers promptly cleaned out his accounts. This is a man in his late 70s/early 80s who is intelligent, but he panicked, got caught in the scammer's net and as a result lost the remainder of his savings. Our friends' family members are each contributing something to restore some small level of the brother's nest egg. The victim is humiliated that he fell for the scam.

It's easy to say we would all be safe from such scams, but these scammers were very skilled, and our friend's brother was alone and vulnerable. If you know someone like this man, forewarning them about this type of scam in advance is highly advisable. Not all older people are tuned in to these sorts of crimes, and in the panic of the moment, they can become highly vulnerable.
I got about 6 calls with the same scam and ignored them.
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Old 06-30-2019, 06:24 AM
 
29,837 posts, read 34,918,975 times
Reputation: 11752
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
Your routing number is on every check you write. And it's specific to that financial institution, not your account, although your account number is also on every check you write. I can't believe your bank advised you to close your account. That makes no sense at all. If a check I've written is stolen or otherwise lost, all I have to do is go online and put a stop payment that check. There is absolutely no need to close the entire account.
https://www.bankrate.com/financing/b...asingly-risky/
Checks have long been a risky and anachronistic way of paying for things, and that’s only become more true with the explosion of online payment fraud in recent years.

Financial writer Felix Salmon of Fusion has a great piece on just how dangerous handing out little pieces of paper with most of the key credentials for your bank account written on them can be. He decided to try a little experiment: he posted his checking account number on Fusion’s Slack online chat service to see what would happen:

I have written checks in years my wife still insists on writing for gifts and her hairdresser. As woman at the bank said they don’t recommend writing checks and it is usually the elderly who insist on writing checks. I told my wife and now for her it is Gift cards and cash for the hair dresser. Again to each their own.
Have a good and blessed day!
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Old 06-30-2019, 06:30 AM
 
71,945 posts, read 71,971,035 times
Reputation: 49502
Quote:
Originally Posted by lchoro View Post
The number that follows the routing number for the bank is the account number. With the name and address printed on the check, the thieves have all they need to print checks or to write temporary checks.



Social Security explicitly states that they will never call you. Like the IRS, they will send computer-generated notices. They send letters to your home allowing you to verify the account. Each time you attempt to log into your account, they send a verification code to your phone to validate the log in attempt.
We saw a video of someone actually creating checks of big corporations using info off the internet with actual signatures .

They got blank checks ... got the company info off the internet .... they grabbed a quarterly report and had an officers signature and then called the company and said they were a vendor and wanted to set up electronic payments , could they get the routing info ...in 10 minutes they had perfect , signed , company checks
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Old 06-30-2019, 06:45 AM
 
29,837 posts, read 34,918,975 times
Reputation: 11752
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
We saw a video of someone actually creating checks of big corporations using info off the internet with actual signatures .

They got blank checks ... got the company info off the internet .... they grabbed a quarterly report and had an officers signature and then called the company and said they were a vendor and wanted to set up electronic payments , could they get the routing info ...in 10 minutes they had perfect , signed , company checks
Yup, reality is that not all have the same amount of money at risk and our financial habits can vary in complexity.
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Old 06-30-2019, 06:57 AM
 
2,173 posts, read 742,560 times
Reputation: 5553
Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
They used to tell us to post our SS on our check also. In fact the IRS people still do.
Not only the IRS. A few years ago I filed my state income taxes and got a nasty note back from them saying that they didn't have one of the checks I'd sent as Estimated Payment. I got on-line and sure enough it had gone out of my account- but I checked the image and realized that I hadn't put our SSNs on them. So, the state cashed the check but must have put it in some suspense account till they figured out what to do with it. DH's name is VERY common but mine is not. They couldn't have figured it out since our address was on the check. Easy to straighten out, but it annoyed me.

Just last week I was signing up for a new pest control service and the clueless young man started by asking for my bank routing info. He claimed that they'd be billing me and I would be the one initiating payments- but he wanted my bank # and routing #. I just switched all my checking over to Fidelity so, no way. I told him it wasn't happening. He then asked for a credit card. Well, OK, then. Now I get 2% cash back and they don't have my bank info. I guess they start with the bank account because they don't have to pay a % for checks but do with credit card charges.
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