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Old 06-30-2019, 08:27 AM
 
Location: Wilmington, NC
1,946 posts, read 351,969 times
Reputation: 3216

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I've never had the SSA call me to verify information. I get a letter saying I need to call them.

My father was a respected physician on the faculty of a well-regarded medical school. In the earliest days of his dementia, before it was recognized or diagnosed, he began to believe that he was going to win Publisher's Clearing House, as he kept receiving mail stating that he had made it through to the next step, and the next. He mistakenly thought that buying magazine subscriptions would put him in a more advantageous position to win. This was an important signal to us that he was having cognitive problems, because otherwise, he seemed perfectly normal.

Why not just accept that this can happen to some people, particularly the elderly, and do whatever you can to educate others?
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Old 06-30-2019, 09:56 AM
 
29,837 posts, read 34,918,975 times
Reputation: 11752
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolinaMoon1 View Post
My father was a respected physician on the faculty of a well-regarded medical school. In the earliest days of his dementia, before it was recognized or diagnosed, he began to believe that he was going to win Publisher's Clearing House, as he kept receiving mail stating that he had made it through to the next step, and the next. He mistakenly thought that buying magazine subscriptions would put him in a more advantageous position to win. This was an important signal to us that he was having cognitive problems, because otherwise, he seemed perfectly normal.

Why not just accept that this can happen to some people, particularly the elderly, and do whatever you can to educate others?
Bada Bing!
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Old 06-30-2019, 11:08 AM
 
20,673 posts, read 16,702,085 times
Reputation: 38869
Quote:
Originally Posted by PartIrish View Post
Some friends of ours who are in their early 70s visited us this week and told us of a sad thing that happened to the husband's older brother. His brother, a retired college professor, got a call that purported to be from Social Security (caller ID said Social Sec.) and they told the man that his Social Security account had been compromised and all his money, including money in his financial accounts, was at risk. They convinced him to provide his account details so that SS could keep his money safe. The scammers promptly cleaned out his accounts. This is a man in his late 70s/early 80s who is intelligent, but he panicked, got caught in the scammer's net and as a result lost the remainder of his savings. Our friends' family members are each contributing something to restore some small level of the brother's nest egg. The victim is humiliated that he fell for the scam.

It's easy to say we would all be safe from such scams, but these scammers were very skilled, and our friend's brother was alone and vulnerable. If you know someone like this man, forewarning them about this type of scam in advance is highly advisable. Not all older people are tuned in to these sorts of crimes, and in the panic of the moment, they can become highly vulnerable.

I agree something is missing here. I once had $2300 charged to my checking account for 2 one way tickets to Chile shortly after I used my debit card at a local gas station. I called the bank as soon as I found out, which was several days later when I got a notice of account overdraft. The bank could clearly see I was not in Chile and the purchase did not fit my pattern. They had me file a report with their fraud department, but they restored every cent to my account the next day. His banks should be working with him in some way.
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Old 06-30-2019, 02:01 PM
 
71,946 posts, read 71,971,035 times
Reputation: 49506
It really depends on the nature of the fraud .....failing to protect your account or info is a biggie in their response. So many people were denied restitution because the bank was able to show they failed to safe guard the info that led to the problem.

Failure to protect your info and freely gave it out is the exception to zero liability.... giving a scammer information when it was so obvious something was wrong may be considered failing to protect your info ....

Last edited by mathjak107; 06-30-2019 at 02:13 PM..
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Old 06-30-2019, 10:03 PM
 
Location: Woodbury, MN
1,465 posts, read 1,537,896 times
Reputation: 1889
It should be basic knowledge to NEVER give out any personal or financial information to an incoming telephone caller. The CallerID information can be fake information. You can never blindly trust the CallerID information. If that ever happens, you need to hang up the telephone, and if you want to verify your situation, do not call the telephone number that is given to you by the incoming caller. Look up the contact information independently and independently verify the information.

This should be basic knowledge that is taught to everyone.
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Old 07-01-2019, 07:32 AM
 
405 posts, read 160,957 times
Reputation: 1144
Maybe the kind family members "fell for it." He is educated and a former college professor. Unless dementia has set in, he should be fairly sharp. I would ask to see his bank accounts and go with him to the bank to verify what happened with the banks. Things might not be as they appear.
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Old 07-01-2019, 07:37 AM
 
12,084 posts, read 5,170,591 times
Reputation: 19075
Quote:
Originally Posted by suziq38 View Post
Maybe the kind family members "fell for it." He is educated and a former college professor. Unless dementia has set in, he should be fairly sharp. I would ask to see his bank accounts and go with him to the bank to verify what happened with the banks. Things might not be as they appear.
As others have mentioned, the fact that he is highly educated and a college professor means nothing. Some highly educated college professors have the common sense of a doorknob.

Last edited by marino760; 07-01-2019 at 08:35 AM..
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Old 07-01-2019, 07:47 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,377 posts, read 6,390,348 times
Reputation: 9967
Quote:
Originally Posted by CarolinaMoon1 View Post
My father was a respected physician on the faculty of a well-regarded medical school. In the earliest days of his dementia, before it was recognized or diagnosed, he began to believe that he was going to win Publisher's Clearing House, as he kept receiving mail stating that he had made it through to the next step, and the next. He mistakenly thought that buying magazine subscriptions would put him in a more advantageous position to win. This was an important signal to us that he was having cognitive problems, because otherwise, he seemed perfectly normal.

Why not just accept that this can happen to some people, particularly the elderly, and do whatever you can to educate others?
Exactly, it also could be cognitive decline, people donít think clearly, may not be dementia even.
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Old 07-05-2019, 02:42 AM
 
Location: USA
3 posts, read 347 times
Reputation: 21
This is a serious matter now a days. Many people receive these type of fake calls. SSA have declared some rules according to which you can file legal case against these kind of frauds. Sometimes these scammers call you from SS Id's and if you share any kind of personal or card information to them they can withdraw your money or can do some serious crime.

Beware of these frauds and report one if you feel it nearby.
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Old 07-10-2019, 03:49 AM
 
Location: USA
3 posts, read 347 times
Reputation: 21
Default Social Security scam

Just got a call from 410-623-7000 on my cell from and at work from 2027885320 simultaneously saying the same thing. When I told them they were calling the DOJ Criminal Division Fraud section and the call would be recorded they hung up.
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