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Old 07-05-2019, 12:57 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,290 posts, read 12,529,205 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by craigiri View Post

It sounds crazy, but a large percentage of the Silicon Valley geniuses these days are on a long list of these and other drugs and supplements. Many of them use "microdosing", which means small quantities of many substances....even LSD. Now that will give you some creativity, but I'm not sure about memory!
I have a theory that the current US social insanity is due to a shortage of LSD.
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Old 07-05-2019, 05:08 PM
 
Location: too far from the sea
19,881 posts, read 18,894,234 times
Reputation: 33803
It's probably different for everyone. I think gingko biloba, but that's only if the problem is due to constriction of blood vessels in the brain. You'd have to be careful if you were taking a prescription drug due to possible interactions. It's been used practically forever and they're studying it now, but I'm not up to date on conclusions. It's a pretty well known suggestion for helping with memory though.

Vitamin B12, because older people don't absorb it very well from foods. Your dr can test you for it. There are sublingual versions available that are well absorbed.

Avoid medications that can cause memory loss--there are medications that are fine for younger people but will cause memory problems in older people. You can google for them or look in the Health&Wellness forum where someone posted a list not too long ago. But there are others that aren't on that list.

I think exercise and fresh air and lots of fruits and vegetables help too. Personally and anecdotally, I think it's also a matter of what you DON"T do. I saw a relative totally lose her memory from a pain killing medication that was prescribed in too high a dose. People exposed to high levels of toxic chemicals can see effects of bad memory in later life--the body becomes less efficient at ridding itself of dangerous things.
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Old 07-05-2019, 06:42 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,290 posts, read 12,529,205 times
Reputation: 19502
Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
It's probably different for everyone. I think gingko biloba, but that's only if the problem is due to constriction of blood vessels in the brain. You'd have to be careful if you were taking a prescription drug due to possible interactions. It's been used practically forever and they're studying it now, but I'm not up to date on conclusions. It's a pretty well known suggestion for helping with memory though.

Vitamin B12, because older people don't absorb it very well from foods. Your dr can test you for it. There are sublingual versions available that are well absorbed.

Avoid medications that can cause memory loss--there are medications that are fine for younger people but will cause memory problems in older people. You can google for them or look in the Health&Wellness forum where someone posted a list not too long ago. But there are others that aren't on that list.

I think exercise and fresh air and lots of fruits and vegetables help too. Personally and anecdotally, I think it's also a matter of what you DON"T do. I saw a relative totally lose her memory from a pain killing medication that was prescribed in too high a dose. People exposed to high levels of toxic chemicals can see effects of bad memory in later life--the body becomes less efficient at ridding itself of dangerous things.
My wife had kidney surgery that was excruciatingly painful, so they filled her full of oxycodone. She is normally one of the smartest people I have ever met, but the drugs killed her memory. When we found alternate medication, she recovered. I was panic stricken that the effect might be long term.
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Old 07-05-2019, 07:29 PM
 
135 posts, read 61,865 times
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Short bursts of aerobic exercise have been found to improve brain function.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/release...0702184555.htm

The study found that short-term bursts of exercise increased synapses in the hippocampus.

I always feel more alert, sharper, and more positive after exercise. Also helps me sleep better. In any way that you're able to, get out there and exercise. Your body and brain depend on it.
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Old 07-05-2019, 07:37 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,213 posts, read 1,354,565 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
I haven't read all the replies, so I don't know if this has been addressed yet, but changing my diet has enormously improved my cognitive ability. I'm now about 99 percent vegan - I cheat once in a blue moon by eating an egg here and there or some fish. Removing animal products and animal fat from my diet, and eating whole foods, plant based diet, has made a huge difference in how I feel.

So, whole grain bread, brown rice, lots of beans and veggies, fruit, is most of what I eat now and I feel a lot better.

Not saying anyone else is wrong for taking their drugs, but this is working for me. Your mile may vary.
But then you are missing the B vitamins in your diet. Many elders need Vita B12.
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Old 07-05-2019, 07:47 PM
 
Location: VT; previously MD & NJ
2,213 posts, read 1,354,565 times
Reputation: 6378
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
There are no vitamins, minerals, plant materials or any sort of dietary supplements that have been shown to reduce the risk of dementia or loss of cognitive abilities as we age. The unregulated supplement industry would like you to believe otherwise but that is a different story of greed.

There is some data to support the idea of use it or lose it. It is by no means clear how important "brain exercises" might be but the effect is likely minimal.

Recently there was a long thread about the use of statins to minimize atherosclerotic disease. A great many of those who posted had decided to avoid the use of statins at all cost. Maybe this issue will cause some to rethink their stance. Atherosclerosis at a minimum adds to the severity and risk of dementia and Alzheimer's.
But the other problem with statins is they can make your brain muzzy and fuzzy. It can creep up on you over time. That is why some of us have stopped statins. I am well aware of the dangers of atherosclorosis and stroke, but I have to be able to think.
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Old 07-05-2019, 07:51 PM
 
Location: California
4,556 posts, read 5,477,908 times
Reputation: 9623
AARP also has brain games but I also enjoy a trip to the local library to meet people and browse.

https://stayingsharp.aarp.org/about/...th/games-play/
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Old 07-05-2019, 09:07 PM
 
6,649 posts, read 3,761,413 times
Reputation: 13726
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBCjunkie View Post
New data released within the past 30 days


https://www.aarp.org/health/brain-he...effective.html
I'm reading that now. Thanks.
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Old 07-05-2019, 09:12 PM
 
6,649 posts, read 3,761,413 times
Reputation: 13726
Quote:
Originally Posted by TwoByFour View Post
It used to take me about 3-4 hours to do the Sunday NY Times crossword puzzle. Now it is twice that. Of course it doesn't help that the cultural references are increasingly to GenX and even millennials rather than boomers. I am not sure doing the puzzles actually does anything for memory, but I keep telling myself they can't hurt.
That's what I was wondering. If it really does help. I have some articles to read (referenced by other posters). Maybe they give some data or studies on that.

I know one of my grandmas did crossword puzzles well into her old age. She seemed pretty sharp mentally. She was forgetful sort of, but she had always been that way. She didn't seem to get worse w/age. (She was pretty sharp cookie. I think that sometimes intelligent people are focused on some things and get scatterbrained about other things. I don't think that's MY problem, though. )
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Old 07-05-2019, 09:21 PM
 
6,649 posts, read 3,761,413 times
Reputation: 13726
Quote:
Originally Posted by harry chickpea View Post
Every person is different, so there is no one-size-fits-all answer. Exercise can keep blood flow nominal. A decent diet can help. The one herb that seemed to help my wife was eyebright. She and I tried a number of the purported brain enhancers with no discernible difference. Stay away from operations requiring anesthesia if possible, and keep sleep apnea under control.

I do a scrabble type of word game - classic words free - but it is easy and only helps a certain type of thinking. I literally ALWAYS win and just play for scores and to get sleepy.

Deficiencies in short term memory may be handled with the use of routines and standard procedures. Keys ALWAYS go in one spot, the morning routine pre-coffee is always the same, etc..
Interesting info.

I agree w/exercise & healthy diet. I do live a healthy lifestyle, but I've slacked off in the last year.

Eyebright. I'll check on that.

I don't have sleep apnea, thank goodness.

Because of posts in this thread, I started with computer scrabble.

About the routines...YES! Too funny. I already do that, so I remember where the keys are and such. My keys, purse, the dog's leash & things, flashlights. Always in the same places. If I don't, it means searching high and low for no telling how long, to find it.

Thanks.
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