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Old 07-07-2019, 03:58 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
21,869 posts, read 14,383,691 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Likewise. This whole business of "easier egress and ingress" with taller vehicles baffles me. Do most people suddenly have a 36" inseam? Speaking personally, I find it to be easier to sit down onto the floor, and to jump back up again, than to scamper into some massive elevated vehicle (truck, van, SUV). Sometimes I'll miss my footing and end up face-planting into the seat, upon trying to get in. And when exiting, I swing my legs outwards, expecting to find solid ground... meeting only air.

Returning to the OP's concern... if finances are strained, then they'll continue to be strained, whether one buys a new car or retains an older one. If finances have adequate elasticity, then there won't be a strain, whether one buys a new car or retains an older one. The only awkwardly strained situation is if one insists on retaining an unreliable money-pit car. That is evidently not the case with the OP.
Our finances are not strained. But we don't generally throw money away on useless purchases.
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Old 07-08-2019, 05:59 AM
 
Location: SW Florida
10,299 posts, read 4,871,936 times
Reputation: 21705
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nefret View Post
We bought a new car last week for just that reason---peace of mind. We spend a good amount of time on the road and felt that the newer safety features would be a good thing to have at our age.

That's why I leased; peace of mind. I don't ever want to break down when it's 95 degrees or humid or pouring rain OR especially on the bridge I travel to and from work. I hate bridges and I certainly don't want my car to break down on one.
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Old 07-08-2019, 08:59 AM
 
Location: Land of the Great Bears
3,495 posts, read 1,918,555 times
Reputation: 3805
17 year old Accord driven just around town should last your lifetime. Ditto for 10 year old Lexus on longer trips.

I'd keep them both unless you really don't enjoy one or both of them, for some reason.
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Old 07-08-2019, 09:24 AM
 
2,374 posts, read 2,392,894 times
Reputation: 2373
Quote:
Originally Posted by chiluvr1228 View Post
My mom died last week and she had a 2002 Chrysler Concord Limited with only 69K miles. My lease is up the end of August. I plan on taking it to a trusted mechanic because it needs two tires and new brakes and drive it for awhile so I can put that $300 a month payment into savings. My only issue is the Chrysler is a big car and I'm used to driving smaller cars but to save $300 a month I'll learn. Living with no debt is great and OP you can always lease if you don't want to buy something. If you have good credit you can get something with a lower payment than buying and you get a new car every 2-4 years. It's something to think about. I've leased for the last 6 years and think it's a great option for some people.

Sorry to hear about your mom. I 2nd the thought that if finances are not tight, a low mileage lease could be ideal for part of one's fleet - just from the eliminating potential headaches perspective.
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Old 07-08-2019, 09:32 AM
 
2,374 posts, read 2,392,894 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
I can easily get into a new Corvette.

But I just can't get out.

Getting old sucks. It really does.
If I ever buy another sedan (or other low down car) I will invest in one of these to help climb out of it. The "controlled fall" part of getting in is easy, getting out of a low car is a challenge. I would expect the opposite behavior with someone who is more vertically challenged.

Generic Car Cane
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Old 07-08-2019, 10:16 AM
 
1,570 posts, read 2,750,181 times
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In my mind, two choices: lease and return forever or drive into the ground. If the latter is your choice, you've picked probably the two hardest cars to drive into the ground. Both are legendary for their reliability.
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Old 07-08-2019, 11:09 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,323 posts, read 6,169,969 times
Reputation: 11627
Quote:
Originally Posted by silibran View Post
I am posting in the retirement forum because I think people here would understand some of the things I am contemplating. DH (76) and I (72) own two cars. The newest is a 10 year old Lexus and the oldest is a 17 year old Accord. The Accord has a little over 100,000 miles on it. The Lexus has more. Both cars have been conscientiously maintained by DH, who really does take care of our cars. I drive the Accord around town, and DH drives the Lexus wherever we go together, including some travel.

I am a little concerned about taking two older cars into our elderly years. I am concerned that at some point we will need to buy a newer car, even though our oldest car has relatively few miles on it. I also would like to have some of the newer safety features, but that is not a huge want for me.

I don't want advice so much, as a way to think about this. I don't feel confident in my thinking. If there is no need to buy a car--probably a late model used car--then I don't want to spend the money. I wonder if we should replace the Lexus, instead of the Accord, but I suspect we should replace, if we replace, the older car. I know that mileage is usually the measure of the age of the car. So, should I simply not worry about this?

I guess what I worry about is learning a new car at an advanced age. New cars have safety systems and alarms. I think I could be OK now, but in 5 years? Who knows?

You can see that I am all over the place on this. Can you help me think this through?

I suspect that DH would buy a new car if I was enthusiastic. But I hate spending the money if we don't have to.

The Accord drives fine. It has been recently serviced, and it has good tires. It has minor body damage and some damage on the wheels.
I used to sell cars, a lot of them to senior citizens.

I'll let others weigh in on when to trade out and trade up, but I'll say there isn't a "right" answer if neither choice causes Financial Anguish.

RE Technology and Learning a new car. IMO people fall into two camps; those that are willing to work and understand new gadgets, and those that aren't. Which are you?
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Old 07-08-2019, 02:20 PM
 
112 posts, read 17,904 times
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I might sound funny, but it all depends on your luck. I personally never ever had any luck with used cars. First three I bought were used ones, since I didn't have enough money for a new one, and didn't understand why anyone ever will buy a car that looses few grands in value as soon as you drive it out of the dealer parking lot.
Well, first car died on me in 9 months. Second didn't start the next day I bought it. After fixing an alternator it lasted few months until I needed to fix brake calipers (or whatever it was called - I already forgot). Third one got transmission fried after 6 months. Mind you, every car I bought was checked by either "good" mechanic, or my friend who is a car repair guru.
On the opposite site, all my friends were quite lucky with their used cars, and they lasted them like forever.

Then I tried new cars. First one (VW Jetta) failed engine in 19 months (fixed under warranty), then failed engine again in just 25 months (right after warranty). Second (Ford Escape) lasted 94K miles, and then all sort of things started to happen to it, i.e. I was paying for repairs more than a new car payment. Third one (Nissan Murano) just started to fail on me last month - but it lasted 14 years.

So, if you are like my friends, and cars love you - don't buy a new one. But if you are like me - run for a new, but high quality one (Lexus/Nissan/Toyota/Hyundai will do).
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Old 07-08-2019, 02:56 PM
 
9,682 posts, read 15,867,988 times
Reputation: 16038
Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
Yes, newer cars have safety systems but they also tend to have annoying "eco mode." On a Mercedes C class sedan I had as a loaner, ECO stop/start was so frustrating I vowed I would never buy another Mercedes. The car shuts the engine off when you're at a stop light. Then there's a delay in acceleration because it only turns it back on when you press the accelerator -- and it's not instantaneous.

I guess it's great for people who 1) like to fool themselves into thinking they're saving the planet and 2) are OK with the notion that the designers of the car know better than they do.

Why not go for some test drives of the current models? Might help make up your mind. Or you can do what I used to do, though it's a bit extreme: Rent a car for 28 days at a time.
We have the same annoying feature on our new Highlander I hate it, too!
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Old 07-08-2019, 03:42 PM
 
1,570 posts, read 2,750,181 times
Reputation: 1558
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanonka View Post

Then I tried new cars. First one (VW Jetta) failed engine in 19 months (fixed under warranty), then failed engine again in just 25 months (right after warranty). Second (Ford Escape) lasted 94K miles, and then all sort of things started to happen to it, i.e. I was paying for repairs more than a new car payment. Third one (Nissan Murano) just started to fail on me last month - but it lasted 14 years.
NFN but those are the worst car brands on earth.
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