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Old 07-08-2019, 03:28 PM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,165 posts, read 8,689,130 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rational1 View Post
Not clear if any of the doctors were glaucoma specialists.

There are at least two surgical procedures for eye pressure reduction. These are fairly routine.
The blind eye is now sealed. There is no where to make an incision.

What is the other procedure?

I've had the eye lasered 4 times - 1995 (pressure was 45, never felt so much pain), 2001, 2003, and 2012.
Joke's on me - thought this was going to be easy breezy but they can't laser it again.

The last 2 doctors have been glaucoma specialists. No one has used the word glaucoma but only pressure.

Last Friday, it was 52.
Other eye was 12.
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Old 07-08-2019, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,165 posts, read 8,689,130 times
Reputation: 6166
Default Been down that route....

Quote:
Originally Posted by PNW-type-gal View Post
I'd look around for a specialty eye clinic, like Casey Eye Institute in Portland or one of the ones associated with a university for at least another opinion in to what is going on. Expensive, probably, depending on your insurance and what they will and won't cover, but it might be worth it.

I have/had a rare eye issue and ended up going to a place where they see hundred of my particular issue in a month rather than a couple a year.
I've been to Bascom Palmer in Miami. The doctors they referred me to I still see.

They spoke about the prosthetic eye back in 1992 so that was their direction back then.

Not using insurance. Self pay.
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Old 07-08-2019, 04:48 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,657 posts, read 3,239,300 times
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Glaucoma involves high pressure in the optic nerve. Pretty sure cataract has nothing to do with pressure. It is about vision. The lens of your eye gets cloudy (a very common occurrence) which is why we have cataract surgery. It replaces the lens that has become cloudy.

I've had a lot of laser done to my eyes. My right eye alone had at least 70 shots at one sitting. It wasn't pleasant, but more of a stinging sensation than pain.

It sounds like you have had an awful lot of problems with your eyes. And when we panic, we want it fixed now. But it very often cannot be "fixed" now. I think changing your glaucoma doctor often could be a mistake. Each new doctor has to start from square 1. Repeat, repeat.

Glaucoma specialists are ophthalmologists.

Having a retina specialists is a total different situation. My glaucoma doctor can't do the retina surgery I need; I have a retina specialist to do that.
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Old 07-08-2019, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Location: Happy Place
3,686 posts, read 1,866,292 times
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I have dry macular degeneration. Diagnosed at age 34 or so. Could turn to wet macD in an instant and I could be blind.

No real problem with it. I refrain from driving at night, because my dark is darker than most. Drusen covers parts of the macula in both my eyes. Sort of weird.
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Old 07-08-2019, 05:43 PM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,165 posts, read 8,689,130 times
Reputation: 6166
Smile Good information, thank you!

Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal1542 View Post
Glaucoma involves high pressure in the optic nerve. Pretty sure cataract has nothing to do with pressure. It is about vision. The lens of your eye gets cloudy (a very common occurrence) which is why we have cataract surgery. It replaces the lens that has become cloudy.

I've had a lot of laser done to my eyes. My right eye alone had at least 70 shots at one sitting. It wasn't pleasant, but more of a stinging sensation than pain.

It sounds like you have had an awful lot of problems with your eyes. And when we panic, we want it fixed now. But it very often cannot be "fixed" now. I think changing your glaucoma doctor often could be a mistake. Each new doctor has to start from square 1. Repeat, repeat.

Glaucoma specialists are ophthalmologists.

Having a retina specialists is a total different situation. My glaucoma doctor can't do the retina surgery I need; I have a retina specialist to do that.
So, with the eye with the pressure (glaucoma), no vision. I guess there was a thought if the cataract (very mature) was removed, it would give them a way to laser it and then the pressure would go down.

The "good" eye has had no change since the surgery in 1992. I know that eyes work in pairs and the "trauma" word comes up often - I don't want to cause the good eye any trauma.

The doctor I went to from 1995 to just recently handed me off to the new one. He's younger (around 45), supposedly up on all the latest and I do feel comfortable with him. He does the harder stuff.

So, I haven't changed doctors all that often.

This is all new to me. I have never been on drops before and read about the side effects and I'm trying not to stress out.
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Old 07-08-2019, 07:22 PM
 
Location: Central NY
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Stress is your enemy. Try to remember that.

What do you mean eyes work in pairs??

I have one far-sighted eye and one near-sighted eye. Not a lot of fun, for sure. But like most things in life, I had to adjust. My family had same problem. My son has it, too.

Try to find something else to think about. If you are in good care by a specialist, let him do the work and the worry. Just do what he tells you to do. But if he is a good doctor, he will answer your questions.

Good luck.
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Old 07-08-2019, 08:09 PM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
5,165 posts, read 8,689,130 times
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Smile Stress - what's that?

Well, I have a lot of that but I think I handle it. Just work related.

Your eyes work together - when one blinks, the other wants to or does. When one eye has trauma, it could cause trauma in the other one. Stuff like that.

A tear just came out of my blind eye. It felt great. Maybe that is the drops working.
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Old Yesterday, 09:41 PM
 
655 posts, read 309,325 times
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I had a cousin born blind in one eye has always had a fake one. Granted I have not seen her in years but I never noticed anything odd about how it looked nor do I recall her ever complaining about any sort of issue. She was just glad to have the other eye working I think!
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Old Today, 07:27 AM
 
242 posts, read 119,361 times
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I have glaucoma. Off and on, the pressure will go up and I'll have to switch medicines. Recently, I had procedures done on both eyes to reduce the pressures, but I still have to use two sets of eye drops.

Anyway, the doctor and I were talking about the next step down the road since the procedure will eventually have to be repeated or may not work at all (20% of the time it doesn't). She said that there was a new procedure, but it is only done in conjunction with cataract removal. Since you have both issues, you might be a candidate.

That is all I know, but ask your doctor. My doctor is an optometrist so obviously she doesn't do surgery, but she does manage my glaucoma. She is married to another optometrist who was actually head of a really good school of optometry at a major university. They know their stuff.

Good luck!
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Old Today, 11:23 AM
 
Location: Central NY
4,657 posts, read 3,239,300 times
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^^^^^^^^^ I had that surgery, glaucoma and cataract, both done during same procedure. One eye done at a time.

Yes, ophthalmologist does that type of surgery. I have a glaucoma specialist. Not every ophthalmologist is a glaucoma specialist, so have to specify.
When right eye was being done, the new lens got stuck on the iris. Had some problems with that.

When left eye was done, all went well with no problems.
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