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Old Yesterday, 06:26 AM
 
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I think overall more people will tell you that it caused family hostility then didn’t if they have siblings or a spouse..

Depending how much care is needed usually one off the caretakers usually ends up getting injured ...for anyone untrained who has not tried to support 150-200 lbs of unstable weight they will likely get hurt at the first wrong move in weight

Last edited by mathjak107; Yesterday at 06:54 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 06:29 AM
 
Location: DFW - Coppell / Las Colinas
31,974 posts, read 36,604,313 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
Sometimes people tolerate granny in the back bedroom in order to preserve her estate and their inheritance in lieu of dumping her in "the home."
Then there was the spinster sisters that lived together on SS income and when the oldest died the other sister just wrapped her in blankets and plastic and locked her in the back room so the checks would not stop.

Just have to get past the smell for the first six months or so.

They found the mummified sister after the 2nd sister passed.
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Old Yesterday, 06:33 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,556 posts, read 17,535,380 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
I did not find this at all interesting. What I see is the sad, sad state of journalism. Virtually every article written in magazines is now written by a 20 or 30 something writer who cranks out cr+p for a low salary. I can only imagine some editor going to one of these 20 something writers and asking for a 1500 word article on the sad state of retirement in the US. Have it ready by tomorrow and give it a title that will catch attention.

I have a hard time deciding which is sadder the poor quality of journalism and writing or the readership.
There is more than a nugget of truth in this.

When I look around my city, the bottom 25% are probably struggling to get by day to day. What's their retirement going to look like? Bleak.
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Old Yesterday, 09:25 AM
 
Location: Ypsilanti, MI
2,435 posts, read 3,659,178 times
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My wife's oldest brother, age 59, has recently made the claim of planning to work forever and never retire. No wife, no house, no savings (that we know of), no personal property ownership other than some power and yard tools, non-union blue collar job with no pension, bankrupted by his middle brother, and beset with a series of health issues (both elbows surgically reconstructed due to power lifting when younger, type-II diabetes, Cardiac Afib, digestive disorder (gall bladder?), persistent cellulitis from unknown cause) that we fear will eventually & suddenly prevent him from working till FRA, or even age 62!
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Old Yesterday, 09:43 AM
 
Location: Silicon Valley
3,609 posts, read 1,623,694 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
I think overall more people will tell you that it caused family hostility then didnít if they have siblings or a spouse..

Depending how much care is needed usually one off the caretakers usually ends up getting injured ...for anyone untrained who has not tried to support 150-200 lbs of unstable weight they will likely get hurt at the first wrong move in weight
Our point of silence isn't necessarily about welcomes or being able to provide....but location. My siblings and I left our small rural town where my mother lives. When the time comes, she'll have to choose between staying in-area with assisted living or transplanting a 1000 to one of the cities with new friends, locations, doctors etc. In the meantime she's going non-stop proofing her home and getting it ready for maximum livability.
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Old Yesterday, 10:10 AM
 
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If you cannot afford rent there are low income senior housing for people. Yes the waiting list is long but preferable to living with kids. Mathjak, I worked with people with disabilities helping them obtain employment and it’s extremely difficult to get SSDI unless you are terminally ill. The severity of mental illness varies and in many parts of the country treatment is practically non existent except for giving them drugs after seeing a psychiatrist for 15 minutes.
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Old Yesterday, 10:48 AM
 
Location: Denver CO
21,157 posts, read 11,761,610 times
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I was very surprised that just the other day, someone I know made the comment that she would never be able to retire. She has a relatively senior position, although it's in a field that is known for low pay ("glamour" type field where people want to work there enough to accept lower salaries). But based on things she's said over time, I would guess she makes something in the high 5 figures, somewhere between 80K and 100K. She lives in NYC, so I know money doesn't go that far there, but I also know that she makes frugal choices all the time and that her housing costs are stable and not that high for the area. Fairly low key lifestyle, limited travel that isn't work-related, doesn't go crazy buying a lot of things, etc.

So while I know she doesn't have an extravagant lifestyle know, I had always assumed she'd be able to replicate that non-extravagant lifestyle in retirement too. Hearing her say that she'll never be able to afford to retire was just such an odd feeling.

I feel like I'm doing ok, both in terms of a decently enjoyable lifestyle now while still saving enough for retirement, but when I hear someone say something like this, it makes me wonder if I'm deluding myself into thinking I am putting away enough.
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Old Yesterday, 10:52 AM
 
Location: In a vehicle.
5,021 posts, read 3,209,323 times
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I have long heard that many people who are 65 and above are still healthy and LOVED their jobs, so why should they quit? Keeps them bright, smart and connected to their friends who are also working.

Heck I shower at a local community center and there's 10-20 retired former military guys who are still working at jobs and more than have have some medical issues, but all still enjoy working...
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Old Yesterday, 11:32 AM
 
71,471 posts, read 71,652,652 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Teacher Terry View Post
If you cannot afford rent there are low income senior housing for people. Yes the waiting list is long but preferable to living with kids. Mathjak, I worked with people with disabilities helping them obtain employment and it’s extremely difficult to get SSDI unless you are terminally ill. The severity of mental illness varies and in many parts of the country treatment is practically non existent except for giving them drugs after seeing a psychiatrist for 15 minutes.
It is only difficult when everyone plays by the rules .....Eric conn had no problem getting a half billion in claims through for people fraudulently who were already rejected .. a doctor and judge worked in cahoots with him .

. a big bust over here in nyc busted over 100 people who played a role in getting fraudulent ssdi for people and ss says this is the tip of the iceberg..

Ssdi being difficult to get is only true if done on the up and up ....there is to much money involved for every one to play by the rules
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Old Yesterday, 11:47 AM
 
3,935 posts, read 3,258,558 times
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I suspect that a lot of those who tell you about their "love of the job," are actually covering for a terrible deficit in their finances, and that creates the need to work with no foreseeable retirement..On the subject of parents and children living together as a result of that no retirement plan not working out: Living autonomously has been a relatively new social aspect, with one's parents of siblings cast as possible "burdens" on those who are enjoying a better standard of living, but that may change as we begin to see the social consequences of workers having no defined pension plan.

The article is certainly a fluff piece written by a young and affluent journalist, but the reality of our collective futures seeming dimmer due to the loss of pensions is noteworthy. As time goes on, the younger generations will see that loss as just another aspect of a life already afflicted with a lopsided financial reality in the workplace. Retirement should be the number one consideration for all workers, but instead we see that living large in the present is all too often hailed as the way to go. Organized labor has a huge recruitment challenge ahead, and speaking to the loss of retirement would seem to be a valid new cause for unions..
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