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Old Yesterday, 09:44 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,401 posts, read 21,239,668 times
Reputation: 24231

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Petunia 100 View Post
Do you find the air in Tucson to help with your breathing? Just curious.
Less wind is helpful, which brings in that fine silica, that powdery film that collects on your cars, which goes into your lungs. Las Vegas is a windy city, 9.2MPH average annual windspeeds, and they could get wind blasters to 70MPH. I haven't experienced that here in Tucson, at least in my first year here.
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Old Yesterday, 01:40 PM
 
7,922 posts, read 5,039,870 times
Reputation: 13577
Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
I've long known worry and stress are negative emotions, which can reduce your immune system and perhaps cause illnesses, so worrying and stressing out about the future, what does it accomplish?
It accomplishes a shortening of lifespan, so that one dies before running out of money.
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Old Yesterday, 03:23 PM
 
358 posts, read 222,731 times
Reputation: 627
Odd provision. Here is the other negative (besides inherited IRAs requirements) from Bankrate website:

Makes select pensions less secure: The Secure Act would accelerate community newspaper pension plan insolvency by allowing financially troubled newspapers to decrease their employer payments, effectively borrowing against employees’ retirements.

The newspapers would be able to artificially increase their assumed interest rate and increase their amortization periods. By allowing unrealistic assumptions, this select subset of newspaper pension plans would be able to shift tens of millions of dollars in otherwise required pension contributions into their own profits.

This provision would make community newspaper employees’ retirements less secure.
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Old Yesterday, 05:23 PM
 
8,852 posts, read 5,132,953 times
Reputation: 10118
Quote:
Originally Posted by pilotpair View Post
Odd provision. Here is the other negative (besides inherited IRAs requirements) from Bankrate website:

Makes select pensions less secure: The Secure Act would accelerate community newspaper pension plan insolvency by allowing financially troubled newspapers to decrease their employer payments, effectively borrowing against employees’ retirements.

The newspapers would be able to artificially increase their assumed interest rate and increase their amortization periods. By allowing unrealistic assumptions, this select subset of newspaper pension plans would be able to shift tens of millions of dollars in otherwise required pension contributions into their own profits.

This provision would make community newspaper employees’ retirements less secure.
If we believe we need to prop up community newspapers, I would prefer tax credits to tampering with employer pension contributions.
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Old Yesterday, 06:30 PM
 
7,220 posts, read 8,641,363 times
Reputation: 9098
Another article that is trying to get people riled up but is not law (yet) and is an opinion piece on top of that. Bait avoided.
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Old Yesterday, 08:04 PM
 
110 posts, read 43,095 times
Reputation: 258
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
Exactly. Though this assertion might be lost on some, a major point of retirement-savings isn't the funding of one's own retirement, but to build a dynasty, over the course of generations. Working-class people save, enabling their children to build comfortable lives of considerable savings. The children do likewise, in proportion, for their own children. And so forth, across the generations. Millionaires beget billionaires.

Contrary to popular belief, the principal tension in the tax-code isn't over dispossession of the middle-class or working-class, in favor of the indigent. It's the perpetual struggle between billionaires and mere millionaires. The millionaires want to supplant the billionaires. The billionaires want to keep the millionaires in their place.

Waxing a bit poetic here, and ranging off-topic... revolutions don't happen by peasants revolting. They happen when the gentry and lower-nobility see opportunity to overthrow the upper-nobility. This is what happened in the English revolution, and the French, and the Russian. All of the leading revolutionaries led comfortable, privileged lives. They didn't emerge from the coal-mines shouting slogans about workers uniting. The workers had no say. Those who did have a say, weren't workers. They were aristocrats themselves, albeit junior ones, who wanted more.

It is not coincidental that tax policy tends in particular to penalize the merely affluent, as opposed to the very-rich. And while the current example is not a major matter, and not one that merits vehement agitation or impassioned call-to-arms, it is nevertheless illustrative of a pattern.

Now back to grousing why international stocks keep lagging American ones...
This is the most accurate assessment I’ve read on C-D to date. In my circle we refer to them as the “I’ve got mine” liberals.
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Old Yesterday, 10:54 PM
 
Location: Haiku
4,073 posts, read 2,574,551 times
Reputation: 6005
Quote:
Originally Posted by ysr_racer View Post
Unfortunately it also raises the taxes of whoever inherited it.
I personally don't have a problem with that. Tax-deferred plans are just that - taxes are paid later. That does not mean "not at all". In the best of all worlds your taxes are deferred until after you are dead. So somebody still has to pay them. The heir can always refuse to accept it.
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Old Today, 03:57 PM
 
8,852 posts, read 5,132,953 times
Reputation: 10118
Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
Less wind is helpful, which brings in that fine silica, that powdery film that collects on your cars, which goes into your lungs. Las Vegas is a windy city, 9.2MPH average annual windspeeds, and they could get wind blasters to 70MPH. I haven't experienced that here in Tucson, at least in my first year here.
Thank you.
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