U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-13-2019, 12:17 PM
 
2,237 posts, read 550,208 times
Reputation: 3893

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
Our planet is already dying quite rapidly and who wants to be alive in 30 years, given the continuing destruction?
I do not agree with your premise, so I cannot agree with your conclusion. At any rate, everyone I know wants to be alive in 30 years. I hope I'm still skiing at that age.

Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
Some people fear retiring because they fear that the boredom will have them bouncing against the walls every day. That's what I thought! Wrong! I'm continually amazed at how fast the time goes when retired, and there's days I want to return to work just to slow things down! I'll put just a few minor tasks to be completed every day, and? Many times, I can't even check one of those items off the list! Where did the time go?
Every retired person I know says the same thing: "I don't know how I ever fit work into my schedule." I'm of the opinion there is no such thing as retirement; you just change what you do.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-13-2019, 12:33 PM
 
2,237 posts, read 550,208 times
Reputation: 3893
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElmersGlue. View Post
I can't see how living at 200% of the federal poverty level (FPL) is living in abject poverty.
At least for most. 75% of Seniors own their homes.

200% of FPL = a couple each receiving a SS check of $1371.50 a month.

The average SS check is $1400 a month (I assume after deducting part B & D??)
  • Our expenses, living in California, are closer to $2000 mo. but for numbers sake, inflated a little
  1. property tax- $80
  2. internet/phone- $75 (actually it's only $5 but we budget, just in case)
  3. Eating Out- $420
  4. Auto Insurance- $110
  5. Maintenance of equip. in place of utilities- $25
  6. Transportation- Auto, Tires, Gas, Maintenance, DMV-$400
  7. Clothes/Personal $100
  8. Part F/out of pocket medical- $300
  9. Animal Feed-$25
  10. Toys-maintenance/savings-$150
  11. Groceries-$300
  12. Vacations- $175
  13. Misc/Unknown= $25 (birthdays etc)
$2185

Our budget lacks utilities, homeowners & should be higher regarding prop tax. So let's add some on

$218 Homeowners for 200K value home
$175 Utilities
$120 additional prop tax
------------
$513 + Our expenses=
$2688 expenses


$2743 (200% of the FPL)
-$2688 expenses
--------
$55 month leftover

How is this not a comfortable lifestyle for most?

Eating out 3x a week, a budget vacation 1x a year, riding quads, canoeing, cycling, skiing 2x a yr.
Caring for chickens, dogs, cats, fish on a budget. Sure you need to be creative- Carpool on trips by placing an add on CL Rideshare. Share gas$ We grow much of our chickens food with compost piles for worms, etc.. Our dog & cat food is homemade.
Anyone can do it. Mostly out of fish from our trout pond but also older meat at great discount from the store. We grow our potatoes in our compost pile. Each potato grown turns into 2-3 more potatoes as you cut the eyes out and toss back in manure pile. We've obtained free chicken food & veges for pet food from Subway. Our gasoline is higher than most because we eat out 3x a week

This is not my version of any form of poverty whatsoever
unless you are renting
Based on historical standards of material well-being and the terms of engagement, our War on Poverty is largely over and a success. Measure poverty based on actual consumption: what food, housing, transportation and other goods and services people are able to purchase. This approach, which captures the effect of non-cash programs (e.g., SNAP and rent assistance) and accounts for the known bias in the CPI-U, demonstrates clearly that across the board, everything is much, much better than it was decades ago.

There is just nowhere near the level of material deprivation that existed several decades ago.

Other indicators support this; for example the poorest 20% of current Americans live as the middle class did a generation ago as measured by the square footage of their homes, the number of rooms per person, and the presence of air conditioning, dishwashers, TVs, computers, and other amenities.

The fact that the economy is much, much better than it was decades ago, of course, doesn't mean it is better for each and every single person. Some people invariably chime in that they know people who are living on the edge. That's an anecdote and is not data. Others chime in that they don't believe data. After all, the data indicate the world is round-ish, and they know for a fact it is flat.

The Grapes of Wrath was fiction. It isn't a documentary, and of course it has no relationship to life in 2019 despite what the 20-odd candidates for the Democratic Presidential Nomination wish were true.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2019, 02:46 PM
 
Location: Greenville, SC
4,654 posts, read 3,706,496 times
Reputation: 8652
Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
Our planet is already dying quite rapidly and who wants to be alive in 30 years, given the continuing destruction?
What on EARTH are you talking about??
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2019, 03:44 PM
 
8,860 posts, read 5,139,069 times
Reputation: 10139
Quote:
Originally Posted by RationalExpectations View Post
If your cousin had continued her career as a lawyer in NYC, I suspect she would have sufficient assets to pay for her children's college education.

That is, by dropping out of the economy, the rest of us pick up the tab for her child to attend college. That is, the rest of us enable her irresponsible economic behavior.
Or they might have kept getting in trouble and ended up in prison. Personally, I'd rather pay for education than incarceration.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2019, 03:53 PM
 
8,860 posts, read 5,139,069 times
Reputation: 10139
Quote:
Originally Posted by RationalExpectations View Post
The Grapes of Wrath was fiction. It isn't a documentary, and of course it has no relationship to life in 2019 despite what the 20-odd candidates for the Democratic Presidential Nomination wish were true.
It is historical fiction. The Joads are fictional; the circumstances they endured are not. The story rings true with those who actually lived through it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2019, 04:01 PM
 
26,115 posts, read 28,514,332 times
Reputation: 24817
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vasily View Post
My advice to younger people who want to retire early? So what are you going to do, after the novelty of not working wears off? Tife.
Answer: Most of them work at things they want to do and earn some kind of income from it. It's typically something they like doing that requires less time than a typical job and it usually (but not always) pays less. The key difference is that work for them is not typically out of financial need, although it does serve to pad their lifestyle spending and/or their savings/investments.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2019, 04:37 PM
 
3,347 posts, read 858,335 times
Reputation: 3844
There are some people (Mr. Money Mustache) who praise their ability to spend so little, but there are some expenses that come along that may not be so negotiable.

I'd not feel confident about a spartan retirement, even if I successfully pared everything down and the numbers added up. I'd expect to pay more in retirement due to health-related issues.

I will work as long as I am able, and continue to save 10% and invest 20%. I am satisfied with the amount of time I have off (4 weeks annually). I look forward to the next generation having a head start and a financial advantage (even if it is as simple as not having to pay interest on a home for 30 years), leaving more disposable income to invest, travel, and enjoy life.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-13-2019, 06:14 PM
 
20,590 posts, read 16,645,141 times
Reputation: 38677
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petunia 100 View Post
Or they might have kept getting in trouble and ended up in prison. Personally, I'd rather pay for education than incarceration.
As for dropping out of the workforce, there are always threads on Work and Employment about how boomers are ruining young peopleís career opportunities because they hang onto their jobs too long. Sometimes you canít win
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 04:18 AM
 
Location: On the road
5,957 posts, read 2,897,780 times
Reputation: 11407
Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post
Our planet is already dying quite rapidly and who wants to be alive in 30 years, given the continuing destruction?
I want to be alive in 30 years, so there is your answer.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vasily View Post
My advice to younger people who want to retire early? So what are you going to do, after the novelty of not working wears off?
I'll nap whenever I want.
I'll take long hikes in the morning.
I'll read a lot more books.
I'll learn to be a better cook since I have more time to do so.
I'll travel for time periods that are impossible when had my career.
If I want to learn a language I'll move to a country that speaks it.
I'll fish and camp on weekdays when 90% less people fishing and camping.
I could go on all day with this...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 04:21 AM
 
Location: On the road
5,957 posts, read 2,897,780 times
Reputation: 11407
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
No, donít believe what you see with your own eyes. Havenít you heard, the data says the problem of poor people in this country no longer exists.
I'm not sure how one assigns a metric to determine whether something as nebulously defined as "the problem of poor people" exists. What data said it doesn't? I can't imagine someone claiming there isn't a problem of poor people in this country.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top