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Old 07-15-2019, 08:33 PM
Status: "0-0-2 Game On!" (set 8 days ago)
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oddstray View Post
Interesting. Cite, please? I'm tempted to agree just because I *feel* the same but is that really documented by studies?
Most of the studies that I have seen lump reading into two groups - paper and ALL electronic media, meaning your computer, your laptop, your phone, your tablet, ereaders. I've never seen a study that just compares a paperback to an ereader, which is the most straightforward comparison.

I suspect that the big difference is between a paper book and something (like a phone or a tablet) that is also actively connected to the internet and can be used to read web pages, email, text, etc.
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Old 07-15-2019, 10:21 PM
 
Location: On the road
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I'd be interested to see those studies as well, I'm not doubting it (I have no idea) but just can't imagine what would be different enough between eyes scanning text on an e-reader versus paper book to have any significant impact on comprehension and retention.
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Old 07-16-2019, 02:05 AM
 
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All the time. And I also write them. I love the feel and smell of a book. I love going to a real library, walking amoung the stacks - browsing, in real, the fabulous books, maybe written more than a hundred yrs ago. Hopefully, nothing will ever replace it. And my own home, I have a library, where I have a room with, hmmmmm.... 4 walls with floor to ceiling bookshelves, 12X12X 8 YES! books are alive and well.
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Old 07-16-2019, 03:40 AM
 
3,351 posts, read 3,057,079 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HighlandGranny View Post
Question for those who will only read paper books:

How often do you travel via planes or trains every year? Have you ever put heavy books in a backpack along with all the other carry on items? Can you fit thick paper books into the seat backs on a plane?
I travel a lot for work. Just bought 4 airplane tickets for the fall. Are usually carry the one book that I知 reading and if I知 close to being finished I will stick the next book in my luggage. When I go to San Francisco and New York there are bookstores in each city that I hit and usually end up with a number of new purchases.

Yes to your last question.
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Old 07-16-2019, 03:41 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
9,841 posts, read 5,500,958 times
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As to paper over electronic, there is that Buffy quote of Giles (I, robot....you jane) I often refer to. Now, that is fiction, it is not a study.......but I think it is valid. At the very least, involving more than one sense in memory seems to have its points.


One other fronts, I have a lot of half read books for they were something I grabbed to the pass the time here and there (and now have been misplaced in a move or two so even though I might want to finish them, I don't know where they are). My Barbara Feldon book about living alone, a few sci fi books, others that I was reading when I had to do laundry at a laundromat. As it is, I expect to be in court in the upcoming weeks where it will be a lot of waiting, so I will grab another paperback, probably a thick one, for the task. Maybe "The Uplift War" for I never got around to finish that one and could probably start that one again.


Perhaps I should do things Scheherazade style, carry two books, so if I do happen to finish one of the half read ones while I wait, I am not left lost at sea, adrift.
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Old 07-16-2019, 03:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
I'd be interested to see those studies as well, I'm not doubting it (I have no idea) but just can't imagine what would be different enough between eyes scanning text on an e-reader versus paper book to have any significant impact on comprehension and retention.
https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...paper-screens/

Actual studies in the link in the article.
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Old 07-16-2019, 06:13 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N.Cal View Post
https://www.scientificamerican.com/a...paper-screens/

Actual studies in the link in the article.
Thanks for the link. I can somewhat agree with it.

For pleasure reading I love my nook but can only read books on my nook because it does a good job of emulating a real book. Any other device doesn't cut it for me.

For all other non fiction books (reference, cookbooks) and magazines I do like the physical copy for navigational purposes.
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Old 07-16-2019, 08:43 AM
 
5,458 posts, read 2,849,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lieqiang View Post
I'd be interested to see those studies as well, I'm not doubting it (I have no idea) but just can't imagine what would be different enough between eyes scanning text on an e-reader versus paper book to have any significant impact on comprehension and retention.
The difference, if any, might not lie in the eyes.

It might be related to the more, more, faster, faster mindset that is so often there when reading anything on an electronic device. Contrast that with deliberately reading—and digesting—printed words. The goal there is to absorb and understand, not skim or scroll. It’s not that deliberative reading of electronic pages is impossible; but there is something about the devices that sets off a kind of Pavlovian response to just Get Through More. Yes, you can hurry through a book without really reading it. Yet when the act of physically picking up and holding a book is part of the pleasure, that tends not to happen much.

Books physically age very slowly. There is no inherent rush to get through them.
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Old 07-16-2019, 08:49 AM
Status: "Traveller " (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Scotland
40 posts, read 4,640 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by N.Cal View Post
I travel a lot for work. Just bought 4 airplane tickets for the fall. Are usually carry the one book that I知 reading and if I知 close to being finished I will stick the next book in my luggage. When I go to San Francisco and New York there are bookstores in each city that I hit and usually end up with a number of new purchases.

Yes to your last question.
The last time I traveled with a paper book on a plane it was a 1,000+ page book. It was heavy and did not fit in the seatback pocket. I bought a Kindle right after that trip.

I stay in SE Asia every winter for months. Obviously a Kindle is the only choice. Yes, there are bookstores but the few choices they have of books in English are not books I want to read.
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Old 07-16-2019, 09:10 AM
 
663 posts, read 147,074 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
The difference, if any, might not lie in the eyes.

It might be related to the more, more, faster, faster mindset that is so often there when reading anything on an electronic device. Contrast that with deliberately reading預nd digesting用rinted words. The goal there is to absorb and understand, not skim or scroll. It痴 not that deliberative reading of electronic pages is impossible; but there is something about the devices that sets off a kind of Pavlovian response to just Get Through More. Yes, you can hurry through a book without really reading it. Yet when the act of physically picking up and holding a book is part of the pleasure, that tends not to happen much.

Books physically age very slowly. There is no inherent rush to get through them.
I get that same feeling when I pick up my Nook. It's for reading, only for reading and it's like picking up a book. When I pick up my Nook, I am picking up a book to read. It's just that the book varies while the weight and size of the Nook doesn't (which is a plus IMO).
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