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Old 07-16-2019, 09:28 AM
 
1,738 posts, read 623,095 times
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I read only paper books. Did try to read a very old, out of print travel chronicle because it was available (only) online, but found reading a book from a screen so unnatural that I couldn't even finish that one book let alone consider ever repeating the experience :-).


I learned how to read very early (my native language is not English, it is a phonetic language in which I think it is easier to learn how to read when very small). My parents say that I learned how to talk and read at about the same time, and I myself never had a memory of NOT knowing how to read. Maybe for that reason, because reading a paper book got wired into my brain so early, words written on paper are entirely alive to me, and completely transport me into a virtual reality of a book. I cannot achieve that by reading from a screen.
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Old 07-16-2019, 09:31 AM
 
13,975 posts, read 7,446,942 times
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I read books as hard copy. I have no consumer electronics in the bedroom.
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Old 07-16-2019, 10:15 AM
 
230 posts, read 65,172 times
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Late to the party, but my own observations.

. There's books and there's books. I can't see an advantage to a paperback over a Kindle Paperwhite. Coffee table books are another matter.
. I wish that they made a cheap, larger Kindle that worked well with .pdf files
. Libraries can be a pain due to the clock countdown for returning books. They never have anything I want in any case.
. Being able to read in low light conditions with backlighting is nice
. Kindles suck for randomly finding something or flipping through them
. The physical quality of books has gone down over time. I get no joy from trade paperbacks. Modern hardbacks are not as charming as vintage ones.
. most importantly, the combination of Calibre, Kindle, and Libgen, while being somewhat illegal, absolutely rules as a concept
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Old 07-16-2019, 10:55 AM
 
663 posts, read 147,074 times
Reputation: 1260
Quote:
Originally Posted by StrawberrySoup View Post
Late to the party, but my own observations.

. There's books and there's books. I can't see an advantage to a paperback over a Kindle Paperwhite. Coffee table books are another matter.
. I wish that they made a cheap, larger Kindle that worked well with .pdf files
. Libraries can be a pain due to the clock countdown for returning books. They never have anything I want in any case.
. Being able to read in low light conditions with backlighting is nice
. Kindles suck for randomly finding something or flipping through them
. The physical quality of books has gone down over time. I get no joy from trade paperbacks. Modern hardbacks are not as charming as vintage ones.
. most importantly, the combination of Calibre, Kindle, and Libgen, while being somewhat illegal, absolutely rules as a concept
It's not illegal if you keep the books only for yourself. Converting, storing and removing the DRM is perfectly fine for personal use on your device.

That was ruled perfectly legal by a judge back in 2014.

Edit: found an article that talks about the ruling:
https://gizmodo.com/its-perfectly-le...drm-1670223538
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Old 07-16-2019, 12:56 PM
 
Location: New York Area
15,970 posts, read 6,288,059 times
Reputation: 12399
I regularly read paper books. The only online documents I read are court documents that are electronically filed. Ditto my (almost) 22 and 23 year olds sons.
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Old 07-16-2019, 02:42 PM
 
5,458 posts, read 2,849,269 times
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Back to the question of better learning through paper books or ebooks: Something that probably affects learning is the fact that people have been reading and writing paper documents for centuries. Brains might have evolved with this “technology.”

Evolution can’t keep up with tech changes now. Maybe the (allegedly better) depth and durability of learning from paper docs is a product of generations having worked with nothing but those, until recently.
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Old 07-16-2019, 03:02 PM
 
230 posts, read 65,172 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TMSRetired View Post
It's not illegal if you keep the books only for yourself. Converting, storing and removing the DRM is perfectly fine for personal use on your device.

That was ruled perfectly legal by a judge back in 2014.

Edit: found an article that talks about the ruling:
https://gizmodo.com/its-perfectly-le...drm-1670223538
from the article: 'legal purchased e-book'

That and Libgen are not similar concepts.
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Old 07-16-2019, 03:11 PM
 
230 posts, read 65,172 times
Reputation: 490
Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
Back to the question of better learning through paper books or ebooks: Something that probably affects learning is the fact that people have been reading and writing paper documents for centuries. Brains might have evolved with this “technology.”

Evolution can’t keep up with tech changes now. Maybe the (allegedly better) depth and durability of learning from paper docs is a product of generations having worked with nothing but those, until recently.
I'd say that there isn't enough difference between a Kindle and paper to matter much. No doubt there's a tiny tactile and visual appearance the might change how well it 'sticks' but I've never run into anything that lays that out. I'd be interested in any study showing the difference between paper vs. e-ink vs. led/lcd.

One problem that I can see that might exist with e-books is the surfeit of choice. For some reason, I think it's easier to grind through a book when it's one of several nearby while an e-book with 1000 books on it might lead you to the short attention span problem that web forums tend to encourage.

I think the real difference in retention/learning is the difference the other direction....typing vs. hand writing.

As an aside, ease of use and low expense favoring use of computers is kind of a shame aesthetically. Laser printers are not where type was, and don't get me started on the degeneration in sheet music from (sometimes) beautiful hand-written scores on larger paper vs. computer engraving on 8.5x11 paper using some sort of printer.
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Old 07-16-2019, 07:54 PM
 
462 posts, read 170,620 times
Reputation: 131
Physical books are much better than e-books. Period.

They create new neural pathways in your brain that change your behavior for the better.
E-books don't have the ability to do that.

I buy all my books from e-bay .....used...in very good condition and that too for less than the cost of an ebook.

And whenever I see it on my bookshelf, it reminds me of the good memories I had with that book.
Its like a friend. You can't get that feeling with an e-book.
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Old 07-16-2019, 08:11 PM
 
Location: New York Area
15,970 posts, read 6,288,059 times
Reputation: 12399
Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
Back to the question of better learning through paper books or ebooks: Something that probably affects learning is the fact that people have been reading and writing paper documents for centuries. Brains might have evolved with this “technology.”

Evolution can’t keep up with tech changes now. Maybe the (allegedly better) depth and durability of learning from paper docs is a product of generations having worked with nothing but those, until recently.
That is indeed the premise of the Alvin Toffler book Future Shock.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Goodreads
(link)This book was written 37 years ago, and Toffler's predictions have to a great degree come true. If you've never read Toffler, he's a must. A classic. Here Toffler speaks of a "Future Shock" in which people are not able to adjust to the quickening pace of society due to technological change. There are certain advantages to technology but are humans capable of keeping up emotionally, spiritually?
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