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Old 07-16-2019, 11:57 PM
 
Location: Mountains of Oregon
15,328 posts, read 17,802,586 times
Reputation: 10691

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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoMoreSnowForMe View Post
Electric bikes for getting around maybe?

The first thing I thought of as a con would be weather. What if there's a storm where you are moored and you're trying to eat your dinner or sleep and the boat is rocking like crazy.

We carried our Honda 90 Trail bike on the front bumper of our motor home. She came in real handy running to the store for a few items/exploring, etc. It would fit on the boat.
It's a good idea to have a good dinghy with motor, in case of an emergency.


I served in our U.S. Navy for 8 years. Sometimes the ship would be rocking & rolling a lot.You got used to it. After a while you don't even notice it...
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Old 07-17-2019, 01:13 AM
 
Location: on the wind
7,218 posts, read 2,975,208 times
Reputation: 24412
Quote:
Originally Posted by kanonka View Post
I'm obviously missing something, but don't see what exactly.

I was recently looking for the boats while chatting with my wife about life, retirement etc, and all of a sudden we got this idea: why not to buy some boat with enough living space, and retire there instead of the house?

Here are the pros: the good-enough used boat of ocean class with living quarters can be had for about 100K. After that (sales tax paid) the only expense would be Florida registration fee (about $160 a YEAR), slip fees (can be found as low as $200/month), some fund for ongoing maintenance/repairs, electricity and fuel. For our current house we would have to pay ~$1000/month just for taxes and HOA; add on top of that electricity, water, pest control and maintenance, and SS is basically toast. So financially, it should be much more feasible to live on the boat. Another plus - you can travel around the world, but that is very expensive (~4000 gals of diesel from Florida to Spain); on another hand, if we'll cruise only around North and South America, then expenses should be on par with air tickets cost without all the air travel hassles.

The only negative that I see - being far from medical help while in ocean (which I don't think will happen often anyway).

What else am I missing? I sure miss something, otherwise everyone would do that.
Well, there is the problem of having your home be even more vulnerable than a house every hurricane/tropical storm season. Can't really evacuate inland with a boat can you? Better have very good insurance on that "home". I've thought about doing this occasionally but wouldn't do it on the SE coast. I used to work for a yacht maintenance company in CA and we maintained several "livaboards". Most owners got tired of it after a few years. Some didn't but they tended to live on cabin cruiser motor yachts not sailboats. Sailboats of that price range are very cramped...they are designed to function under sail not parked in a slip. Unless you really spend time out of the slip a lot marina life can get very tiresome and expensive. Your home can sink for a lot of reasons if your dock power fails.
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Old 07-17-2019, 04:28 AM
 
Location: Ypsilanti, MI
2,461 posts, read 3,676,295 times
Reputation: 4840
Two widely shared comments regarding boat ownership:
  1. A boat is a wood-lined hole in the water into which you pour money.
  2. The two best days of boat ownership are the day you buy it and the day you sell it.

Do you even know how to sail? There was a rescue at sea maybe a year ago involving a young couple in who thought it would be great to buy an inexpensive sail boat and cruise the world. Neither knew how to sail. IIRC they never got outside the harbor before terminally damaging their boat and requiring rescue.

In case you missed this story......

https://www.foxnews.com/travel/coupl...days-into-trip
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Old 07-17-2019, 04:37 AM
 
Location: In the land beyond Ohare!
933 posts, read 479,076 times
Reputation: 2044
Constant salt water boat maintenance, $$$!
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Old 07-17-2019, 05:12 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
104 posts, read 36,936 times
Reputation: 240
My neighbors did this. They have become ‘loopers’, a community of boaters who sail the Great Loop. They are really enjoying their adventure. They keep a daily blog so I can keep up with them from afar. I’m very envious!
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Old 07-17-2019, 05:36 AM
 
6,318 posts, read 4,762,537 times
Reputation: 12973
You seem to have left out maintenance costs and docking fees. I cannot imagine being stuck permanently at sea, 24/7.
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Old 07-17-2019, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
6,433 posts, read 4,192,537 times
Reputation: 5727
Don’t count on Medicare while outside the US. You will have to have other insurance, so you will have premiums to consider.
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Old 07-17-2019, 07:25 AM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
4,985 posts, read 3,475,327 times
Reputation: 10533
Find some blogs such as mentioned and research, research, research.

A co-worker bought a boat to live on during the good months and rented a room during the harsh ones. She loved it but, being that it was Minnesota there were a lot of bad months.

I don't know how it turned out or if she's still doing it. I know she didn't know how to run it and hired someone to bring it to a slip.

I've seen a couple of videos on people doing this. It actually looks like it would of could work. Just like lot rent you would have to pay slip rent. The difference between rving and boat living would be that you can't buy a lot to put it on. Or maybe you could, I don't know.
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Old 07-17-2019, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,815 posts, read 4,859,778 times
Reputation: 19535
Quote:
Originally Posted by dnkw View Post
My neighbors did this. They have become ‘loopers’, a community of boaters who sail the Great Loop. They are really enjoying their adventure. They keep a daily blog so I can keep up with them from afar. I’m very envious!
We have a couple of couples here that have done the liveaboard, great loop lifestyle, one for 8 years. They enjoyed it, but were ready for more room and stability now.

I would say that it would be best if you could somehow "try it out" before selling off all your stuff and sinking your savings into a lifestyle that you've never experienced.
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Old 07-17-2019, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Hiding from Antifa?
6,433 posts, read 4,192,537 times
Reputation: 5727
There’s probably a 90% chance or better that at some point in the future you will still be alive and won’t be living the lifestyle anymore. Any monies you commit to it, for the most part, won’t be available to you for the after situation. Boats depreciate. If you won’t have enough left to set yourself up in a rental or purchased home, I would recommend against it.
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