U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 07-20-2019, 01:26 PM
 
Location: Upper Left Hand Corner
2,625 posts, read 973,650 times
Reputation: 4324

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Fran66 View Post
This is from the federal government National Institute of Health. You can just scroll down to "6. Conclusions" (but I have the whole article very interesting). Make your own decisions, of course, but my vote, based on this article, is that you stop taking your statin.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6024687/
Thank you for the link. I will save it to my Cholesterol folder. Here is a very good pro saturated fat article with abundant links to studies that back up their stand on it. It's very easy to read, and logical.

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition...r-bad#section4

----------------------------------------
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 07-20-2019, 01:33 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,691 posts, read 3,261,742 times
Reputation: 12031
This has been a good read showing me that being tired is nothing "new" to my age group (77). Once I just relax and say it's OK to take a nap and not worry about it, one less thing to worry about.

I've stopped statins altogether. The last one was not agreeing with me as all of them have made problems for me. I made a decision to tell my doctor I wasn't going to take any of that stuff. The only things I won't give up are my antidepressant and blood pressure meds. I have stopped the vitamin thing, too.

And I feel a lot better. OK, so I might not get to 90 or 100, but I don't want to anyway. I'm happy, relaxed, no worries, feel fine (most of the time).

Why take meds that make me feel lousy.

On my recent blood work test, my doctor wrote "looking good, keep doing what you're doing."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2019, 02:15 PM
 
Location: Knoxville, TN
1,282 posts, read 600,244 times
Reputation: 2825
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlulu23 View Post
"Monocytes: High levels of monocytes may indicate the presence of chronic infection, an autoimmune or blood disorder, cancer, or other medical conditions."

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/315133.php

-------------------------------------------
Also, never rely on one blood test. I had a wonky result and my GP sent me to a hematologist at a cancer center. Scared the bejeezus out of me. The doctor there repeated the blood test, walked in and shook my hand and said "your blood test is completely normal." He then said the GP should never have sent me to him without repeating the test. It was such an outlier and I would have been feeling sick if it had been accurate....I wasn't sick. I was just at the GP for an annual physical when that weird result cropped up. So, tests can be wrong!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2019, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Central Ohio
622 posts, read 254,817 times
Reputation: 1186
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlulu23 View Post
Gosh I know, it's difficult trying to decide what the best plan of action would be. It's such a personal decision to make. Sometimes we have to be our own detective in these things if our doctor isn't helpful. They really don't know everything unless they were constantly researching what others have found. When you first started statins could you feel a negative difference between before, and after noticeable enough to know it was caused by the statins? You could do a search for "negative effects of statins", and also "how to stop taking statins" to get as much input as possible to make a wise choice.

There was a study I read in the past that explained that statins only helped a small percentage of men who already had a heart attack (i think), but it didn't really help women at all. I paraphrased that because I don't really remember the exact terms that were used. I found it when I was following one of my rabbit trail searches, and don't think I saved it.

It's good you are taking CoQ10 as statins lower it, as you know. The article says that CoQ10 can make a certain blood thinner not work as well. But what are you going to do since CoQ10 is good for the heart. I took it several times, but could never sense a change either way. I wanted it to work though. And it's kind of expensive. But if it worked it would be worth it.

It's good you are taking less of the statins. One of the articles said that there is a difference between statins, and some kinds don't give as much of the muscle pain like others do. I wonder if you would feel better if you weaned yourself off of them, as an experiment. That might be one reason you felt better at a high cholesterol level, idk. Your doctor might have a fit since they are trained to believe that anyone with high cholesterol is going to drop dead any minute. Some of them don't like it when people think for themselves.
I was initially on 10 (gms?) of statin and had no problem for the first 10 years! Then, the last couple of years I started to have horrific leg cramping at night...quit the statins and they went away almost immediately....next blood test, of course cholesterol was up...so doc put me on a different statin...no leg cramps now, and NOT taking 40 (gms?) a night...no way, that seems like a lot going from 10 to 40. Anyway, I notice if I don't take them for a few days, I have more energy and can go up and down the stairs without the knees aching....my HDL is good...59, but I still worry! If my regular reading without statins was up to 240 or so, I wouldn't even worry, but over 300??? Still, both of my grandmothers (no statins) lived well into their 90's.......so maybe I should just chill out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2019, 04:57 PM
 
Location: Upper Left Hand Corner
2,625 posts, read 973,650 times
Reputation: 4324
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
Yes but this was 2015. The JAMA abstract that he posted is new itís from 2019. I eat a lot of eggs and I remember when they said eggs are now no problem, but that was just tested again in the linked study and their results shouldnít be dismissed in favor of a five year old guideline. I did read that study after he posted the link and it found a direct correlation. I donít know if Iíll cut them out completely but Iím certainly going to cut down.

Back to the topic though, tiredness is not all just due to diet. That would not explain tiredness in someone older if theyíre eating the same diet as they did 10 years ago and they are tired now then apparently itís not just diet. For myself, I feel more tired though when I eat a lot of starchy carbs even good grains.

I think hormones have a lot to do with it. But also trouble sleeping does as well. I sleep much later than I used to, and once a week I find it harder to fall asleep again. So then I feel more tired the entire day.

Sorry to disagree, but no. The date on the article is also the same. I made sure it was before posting. Here is the by line:

By ELIZABETH MILLARD
MAR 19, 2019

The article I provided is discussing the very same JAMA study that the gentleman gave earlier. The link in my article leads to the very same JAMA study in his post. 2015 to 2019 is four years, not five.

2015 - 2016 1 yr
2016 - 2017 2 yrs
2017 - 1018 3 yrs
2018 - 2019 4 yrs

The date 2015 was found here: "daily cholesterol limits were removed from the U.S. governmentís 2015 Dietary Guidelines for America." The article explains why it was removed. Yes, it was removed in 2015, but as of March 2019 it was still removed so that info is still relevant. If you would read through the whole article you would understand how they came to that conclusion.

Aside from that, truth is still truth no matter when it was written. The article explains very clearly that the study had issues, and what they were, and why they were inaccurate. I'm not going to cut back on eggs because I don't believe them. There are too many variables in that study, and the authors of that study even admitted there were problems with it as stated. Also, who funded the study? The drug companies? A study can be arranged in such a way as to make the outcome just the way they want it to be.

There are other viewpoints out there, we just have to search for them as they are going against a wave of popular thinking due to faulty studies. But don't worry, wait a few years, and they will change their minds again, lol. Eggs with the yolks are high quality protein, and have been eaten for many thousands of years. The heart disease problem is only about 100 years old. The obesity, and diabetes epidemic started just about when the low fat craze started. Something to think about. Everyone should do their own research, and come to their own conclusions about their health issues. It's good to study both sides in order to make a wise choice. Hopefully we will then get healthier, and have more energy. But there is only so much we can do as aging is relentless.

P.S. Declining sex hormones are commonly associated with poor sleep.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2019, 05:04 PM
 
Location: Upper Left Hand Corner
2,625 posts, read 973,650 times
Reputation: 4324
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unicorn hunter View Post
Thanks for the article; however, it is mainly a discussion of dietary fats/cholesterol....my level is naturally high, no matter what I eat or don't eat.....guess I should head back to the health forums and not side-track the original discussion here!
The OP mentioned that he was on statins so that is how we ended up here. They are a well documented reason for fatigue, and muscle pain.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2019, 05:08 PM
 
Location: Upper Left Hand Corner
2,625 posts, read 973,650 times
Reputation: 4324
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fran66 View Post
One of the things I took from the article is that high cholesterol doesn't matter, period. I've done research over the past few years that says the exact same thing (I am not going to inundate this forum with it). And my cholesterol has been 225-250 for years -- I just don't pay attention to it.

My 'thing' is: take as few Rx drugs as possible (all of them have some bad side effects), get our 'affairs in order' and enjoy the great ride we've been having for as long as we have left. I refuse to worry about my health (I DO worry about the bad healthcare all of us in The US is getting these days -- THAT scares me -- I have worked for hospitals and volunteered in hospitals, and I've seen many patients die primarily because the hospital wanted to save a buck). I'm not 'glib' about life and death -- I just have known so many people who didn't make it to 70 (my age) -- I'm so grateful that I have, and I figure any time I have from now is pure 'gravy'.
Amen!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2019, 05:21 PM
 
Location: SW Florida
9,777 posts, read 7,060,462 times
Reputation: 14355
Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal1542 View Post
Thank you for creating this thread. I am tired a lot, have talked to my doctor about it but she never really seems to put any importance on it. I'm 77, life has not always been easy, but have been retired since about 2010 so not working, no real reason to get up early. By the time I get into bed, I'm ready to sleep. I've had a couple of times when extreme tiredness took over and I had to go to bed before my normal time and wasn't able to do the few chores I do before going to bed.

So I had a complete bloodwork done for a surgery I'm having August 2 and the one thing I noticed and don't really understand is high monocyte (11.5, normal range 2.0-10.0). Checked it out on Google and still do not know what this means.

Anybody have any familiarity with this?
Looks as though your monocyte count is just over that laboratory's normal ranges for monocytes. Monocytes are a type of white blood cell, one of their functions in the immune system is ingestion and destruction of microorganisms, or other foreign substances, cleanup after inflammatory processes in the body. You might see increased numbers of circulating monocytes after an illness or infection,
or fighting an illness ( even a mild viral illness), with chronic conditions such as autoimmunr diseases.

I don't think I'd attach much significance to a few more monocytes than usual, but if you're wondering about yours you can ask your doc about it.

There are so many reasons for being tired ( and so many different levels of tired, from what I can see), and it's natural to label it as a consequence of our advancing years, I'd say. I can't see that being tired at the end of a day, or even needing a nap sometimes as something much to worry about as we get older ( or so I tell myself, LOL, I'll be 72 in about 2 weeks ).,
It's the overwhelming tiredness that keeps us from being able to carry out the activities of daily living, or to even accomplish a few small tasks, on a regular basis that is worrisome, even for us dinosaurs. But who's to say what's a consequence of advancing years and what's indicative of problem (s) that can be improved is anybody's guess, so it's a good idea to get it checked out.

I was there. I thought my increasing tiredness and intermittent difficilties in completing tasks over the last couple years had to be due to my advancing years, or perhaps were caused by side effects of medication, the weather, any reason I could come up with. I was a bit anemic but not that bad. What I also noticed was a decrease in my heart rate over that time, likely, but not entirely due ( they tell me), to side effects of medication I've taken for years to control a tachycardia. This tiredness and other symptoms progressed over time and the heart rate continued to fall, even after changes and adjustments in medication, and testing over time. They told me it was "sick sinus syndrome", and implanted a dual chamber cardiac pacemaker in June. I felt better the next day, and after a few pacing and other adjustments, I felt like a new person. I even think I see the Energizer Bunny marching up over the horizon.

This may not be all that common a reason for unexplained tiredness, but it does serve to illustrate that sometimes it's due to things that can be fixed.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2019, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Upper Left Hand Corner
2,625 posts, read 973,650 times
Reputation: 4324
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sand&Salt View Post
I have very high cholesterol too---over 300. But my HDL is very high, LDL is very low, so no way would I take statins. Cholesterol is needed for brain function. I prefer not to take meds at all (unless an emergency).

It's a personal decision, but I choose to eat meat, fats and dairy as our ancestors did. If that causes an early death (did not for my forbears), so be it.

I haven't noticed being any more tired in my 60s, but bad joints limit much former activity. I was never very energetic, but always had physical jobs and hobbies. My ex used to call it "Swedish Speed" LOL.

Never have been a napper, but sleep a full 8 hrs. My guess is lack of quality sleep creates tiredness for older folks.
I agree wholeheartedly. The Westin A. Price Foundation has great information on eating a traditional diet, if anyone is interested. It is believed to lead to better health.


https://www.westonaprice.org/

------------------------------------------
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 07-20-2019, 05:33 PM
 
Location: Upper Left Hand Corner
2,625 posts, read 973,650 times
Reputation: 4324
Quote:
Originally Posted by Unicorn hunter View Post
I was initially on 10 (gms?) of statin and had no problem for the first 10 years! Then, the last couple of years I started to have horrific leg cramping at night...quit the statins and they went away almost immediately....next blood test, of course cholesterol was up...so doc put me on a different statin...no leg cramps now, and NOT taking 40 (gms?) a night...no way, that seems like a lot going from 10 to 40. Anyway, I notice if I don't take them for a few days, I have more energy and can go up and down the stairs without the knees aching....my HDL is good...59, but I still worry! If my regular reading without statins was up to 240 or so, I wouldn't even worry, but over 300??? Still, both of my grandmothers (no statins) lived well into their 90's.......so maybe I should just chill out.

"Anyway, I notice if I don't take them for a few days, I have more energy and can go up and down the stairs without the knees aching" This right here is your clue.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top