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Old Today, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,309 posts, read 12,537,923 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fran66 View Post
What is the matter with you people???? I'm with Stealth Rabbit. I have only one degree, but I've been taking college classes all my adult life. I start again in September (at age 70). I'm going only to our local CC, and I'm taking only a couple of tech classes to help me stay 'current' with computer tech. Still and anyway -- I love being on campus, learning new stuff, getting to know the kids (who treat me like I'm fragle! LOL), being the oldest on in class, by far. LOLOL What is there not to love about education and college???
Our local CC offers a "Golden Age" pass that gives senior citizens a 50% break on tuition. It beats hell out of sitting in front of a TV.
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Old Today, 01:39 PM
 
1,694 posts, read 581,526 times
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I went right out to work upon graduating from high school and didn't set foot inside a college until I was in my early 30s after I quit my job due to a sexual harassment situation (waaay before the MeToo movement, lol) and my then-husband said we could afford it if I stayed home. After about a year of that I decided to take a horticulture class at the local community college and long story short ended up getting an Associates Degree. Transferred to the State University with a double major and would have gotten a Bachelors if I hadn't had to deal with a high risk pregnancy that cut it short. Motherhood and college just wouldn't have been a good fit for me, so that was that. I was probably one semester short of getting my BA but it wouldn't have been anything career related, simply personal interest -- so there was really no point.

As a retiree there is again no practical reason for me to go back to college. Even when I was in my mid 30s I was always the oldest student in the class and felt rather like a fish out of water because of that. Or at least that's the way I always felt the other students regarded me. I remember one of them making a snarky remark about "you pain in the *** old people ruining the curve", LOL. I'm sure many more thought that than came out and said it.

Like someone else said early in the thread, the biggest perk for me about my life now is that I rarely have to be any particular place at any particular time. Heck, I even take my defensive-driving class every 3 years online so that I don't have to sit in a library classroom for 6 hours, but can do it at my leisure spread over 30 days whenever, LOL! So no desire whatsoever to be a classroom student again.
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Old Today, 01:47 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
7,748 posts, read 4,758,012 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fran66 View Post
What is there not to love about education and college???
College isn't necessary to acquire an education.

There's nothing wrong with "us people."
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Old Today, 01:53 PM
 
1,694 posts, read 581,526 times
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Someone else mentioned the cost (or lack thereof) of auditing classes. The state university here does offer Senior Auditing but there are requirements and restrictions. For example, many types of classes don't allow senior auditing; there has to be at least two "empty seats" in a classroom section for one of them to be available to one senior; the senior has to supply any books or materials necessary; and there's a $50 registration fee per class.

The OSHER program that someone mentioned earlier is $325 for a full year (plus an additional $100 for parking lot access), $165 for a single semester (plus $50 for parking), or $80 just for the summer session (plus $50 for parking.)

No colleges in my area offer free auditing or classes or workshops for seniors.
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Old Today, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
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There's an uninteresting conceit being bandied about by a few in this thread that when one leaves college, one ceases to learn.

That superior pose doesn't look good on you.
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Old Today, 02:31 PM
 
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One of the more unique classes I took was a 6 week pattern/moulage drafting class at a community college when I still lived in California. It wasn't related in any way to my major in college or B-school, it was something I was interested in learning at the time and there was a great teacher who I wanted to learn from. Had the class occurred in some other setting, not at a college, I would have taken it wherever it was held, if it was convenient to do so.

Maybe the question should be clarified: would you get a(nother) degree in college in retirement?

Learning things I'm interested in learning, yes, regardless where the learning occurred -- be it on a college campus or some other venue or even online. Some types of classes are best in-person, others it doesn't matter. For the purpose of obtaining another degree? No, that wouldn't be of interest to me.
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Old Today, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,250 posts, read 54,695,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xPlorer48 View Post
Me, too. That darn Algebra II. I was in honors classes and am a whiz at simple arithmetic. I still do not use a calculator. But, second year Algebra was a hard one. My only C in high school. I think it has to do with order of operations. As a right brainer, I do poorly with sequential items of more than 3 or 4. I have to write down steps to do complex tasks. Photoshop or any of the Adobe Suite are maddening in their insistence upon numerous ways to perform the same action. Marketing people won out over the engineers is what a professor told me.
I am good at arithmetic, too. As a matter of fact, part of my job was overseeing evaluation committees who scored proposals against a set of predetermined weighted criteria. At the end of the scoring, some one always pulled out a calculator to calculate the results. I did it on paper for my own amusement to see if I could beat them and come up with the same results. I usually did.

But algebra is a whole other animal, and it seems completely illogical to me.
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Old Today, 02:55 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
There's an uninteresting conceit being bandied about by a few in this thread that when one leaves college, one ceases to learn.

That superior pose doesn't look good on you.
+1. I never stopped learning even though I knew I would never have a college degree.
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Old Today, 03:02 PM
 
7,280 posts, read 8,668,333 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post

But algebra is a whole other animal, and it seems completely illogical to me.
Algebra remains my favorite math, one I use all the time. Geometry was tortuous. Calculus was required for B-school. I was dreading that class but got through it and came away thinking Geometry was still worse.
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Old Today, 03:04 PM
 
5,400 posts, read 6,548,967 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Azureth View Post
I know this is retirement, but is there any situation wherein you'd go to college again? And how would you feel about it?
Actually I do and enjoy it thoroughly. An fully retired. Take classes for credit, don't know why I put myself through that when I could just audit but I have learned so much and have developed new appreciation for one thing or another. Perhaps the reason I take for credit is to exercise and stress the brain as I age.

To my experience it is amazing how nice and friendly the young students are and how interested they are in your life and back ground. They will stay after class and ask why are you taking classes, what did you do in life, what is your background. stuff. Nice young men and women. Full of spirit and enthusiasm.

adding about pursuing another degree. I may, it doesn't matter one way or another. I love history and have done a lot of 'self education' through reading and may focus on that.

Last edited by theoldnorthstate; Today at 03:16 PM..
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