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Old Today, 03:04 PM
 
13,345 posts, read 25,596,053 times
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I never liked school, although I can be pretty good at it (not algebra or chemistry). I've gone to 2 years of undergrad, quit because I didn't see why I should borrow money to take liberal arts. Two years of RN school to get a job. A year of tech writing school to get a job. Two years of public health grad school to get a career and failed to make it work.
I like hearing discussion and reading. I totally dislike putting back in papers and projects what I just heard or read. I'd only go to a college class if it were older people (nothing like that life experience to enliven discussion!) and certainly not for another job, now that I'm retired.

I also find it rather facile and obnoxious that people who don't want to go to (or back to) college are sitting in front of the TV. Like that's the only choice.
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Old Today, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,252 posts, read 54,695,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Travelassie View Post
You sound like you needed a good algebra teacher who knew his/her algebra and also how to teach. My husband, the retired biomedical engineer who's a technical whiz with anything electronic also has/had a mental block with algebra (figure that). He blamed it on his high school algebra teacher, who he claims seldom came to her classes sober.
Most people loved my 9th grade algebra teacher. I liked her, too, but I was completely lost in her class. I only got by because a friend kept trying to show me how to do it, and in the end, I would copy down what she did and hand it in, but it meant nothing to me.

My daughter had trouble with math, too. She had an excellent teacher who tutored her after class, and she got through it.

I took other sorts of classes all my life besides reading on my own. Mostly writing workshops. THAT I can do.
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Old Today, 03:18 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,677 posts, read 40,039,994 times
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College (or any education) does not have to be 'sitting in a classroom'... I spent very little time in class during my last Master's program (3 hrs Friday night and a Saturday morning every 4 - 6 weeks). I could have survived without classroom time, just done the extra projects / field trips (international) and guest presentations (Often at businesses / national parks, ranches...)

I would expect far less "seat-time" than what you might remember from the 1950 - 70's classroom experience.

Lots of ways to learn...

Just do it! (If you so desire)

Lots of ways to share your knowledge (Please do it if possible.)
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Old Today, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
16,380 posts, read 10,364,355 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
I never liked school, although I can be pretty good at it (not algebra or chemistry). I've gone to 2 years of undergrad, quit because I didn't see why I should borrow money to take liberal arts. Two years of RN school to get a job. A year of tech writing school to get a job. Two years of public health grad school to get a career and failed to make it work.
I like hearing discussion and reading. I totally dislike putting back in papers and projects what I just heard or read. I'd only go to a college class if it were older people (nothing like that life experience to enliven discussion!) and certainly not for another job, now that I'm retired.

I also find it rather facile and obnoxious that people who don't want to go to (or back to) college are sitting in front of the TV. Like that's the only choice.

unfair assumption on your part. Just because somebody isn't in school doesn't mean they're sitting in front of the tv.


just because they're (we're) not taking classes doesn't mean we're not learning.
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Old Today, 03:28 PM
 
13,345 posts, read 25,596,053 times
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Originally Posted by PAhippo View Post
unfair assumption on your part. Just because somebody isn't in school doesn't mean they're sitting in front of the tv.

just because they're (we're) not taking classes doesn't mean we're not learning.
You've gotten me mixed up with someone else. I was responding to another post that said college classes were better than sitting in front of the TV and I was referring to that.

Going a bit further, the original title of the thread was "Going (back) to college." As a blue-collar experience wrapped into a white wine kinda life, I wince at the assumption that everyone reading the thread of course went to college in the first place. I have long thought that college is how the middle class pays its kids to run away from home, with the hope that they'll be in touch with a better class of people than not.

It's also very much a class thing, not purely an intelligence thing at all.
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Old Today, 03:55 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,252 posts, read 54,695,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brightdoglover View Post
You've gotten me mixed up with someone else. I was responding to another post that said college classes were better than sitting in front of the TV and I was referring to that.

Going a bit further, the original title of the thread was "Going (back) to college." As a blue-collar experience wrapped into a white wine kinda life, I wince at the assumption that everyone reading the thread of course went to college in the first place. I have long thought that college is how the middle class pays its kids to run away from home, with the hope that they'll be in touch with a better class of people than not.

It's also very much a class thing, not purely an intelligence thing at all.
Thank you for saying that. I thought the same thing but after living a life working among people with degrees who were unaware that I didn't have a formal education/college degree, I think I still have that tendency to keep that part of me hidden even when it doesn't matter anymore.

Kind of like my mother going into a bit of a panic when at 80 the VFW asked her to give a speech on what it was like in our hometown during WWII, and she was concerned that they would discover she didn't graduate from high school, lol. (She asked me to review and edit her speech after she wrote it. I took out two words. My mom is a naturally good writer.)

My dad was a disabled veteran, double amputee, with what we now would call PTSD. He had gone back after the war and gotten an engineering degree, but he wasn't involved with our school work. My mom was a high-school dropout who had grown up in poverty and now was trying to deal with a disabled husband with PTSD and seven kids. They barely glanced at our report cards.

It never even occurred to me to think about going to college. That was something other people did. I had no idea why anyone in their right mind would want to go to FOUR MORE YEARS of school after finally getting out of high school. I remember kids talking about taking the SATs and thinking, "What does that mean?" After high school, you got a full-time job. Only when I realized I was going to be working at retail jobs forever unless I learned to type did I look at going to some sort of school. Secretarial school was one year, not four, and I could still work nights and weekends while I went.

I always read, though, especially history, just because it interested me. I always wrote. Loved words and their meanings. It is no accident that my daughter has a degree in linguistics.

And no, education has nothing to do with intelligence. One of my favorite quotes:

Strange as it may seem, no amount of learning can cure stupidity, and formal education positively fortifies it. ~ Stephen Vizinczey
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Old Today, 04:16 PM
 
6,345 posts, read 5,079,035 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
Most people loved my 9th grade algebra teacher. I liked her, too, but I was completely lost in her class. I only got by because a friend kept trying to show me how to do it, and in the end, I would copy down what she did and hand it in, but it meant nothing to me.

My daughter had trouble with math, too. She had an excellent teacher who tutored her after class, and she got through it.

I took other sorts of classes all my life besides reading on my own. Mostly writing workshops. THAT I can do.
Maybe they didn't explain it correctly?

What is the purpose of algebra and why do they use those letters

You want to get to a solution and have to figure out the quantities or values that will get you there using a formula.

If i want to plant 20 rose bushes and i see they are having a sale of packs of 10 white and 5 pink. And i like both type. How many would i need to buy of each pack to make 20.

W(1) + P(2) = 20
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Old Today, 04:38 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
37,162 posts, read 45,714,466 times
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I got married out of high school to a college graduate. We got divorced 12 years later. You better believe I wish Id gone to college instead.
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Old Today, 04:42 PM
 
12,067 posts, read 5,161,506 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lottamoxie View Post
Algebra remains my favorite math, one I use all the time. Geometry was tortuous. Calculus was required for B-school. I was dreading that class but got through it and came away thinking Geometry was still worse.
You either have a brain that likes to solve algebra equations or one that finds geometry more palatable. I could never grasp algebra if my life depended on it. It never made any sense to me at all and I struggled just to pass it, but I did well with geometry and trigonometry. It just depends how your brain is wired I think.
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Old Today, 04:47 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,323 posts, read 6,375,629 times
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I love geometry, I used to spend hours in the summer to do them for fun. I had a brother almost at genius level for math. He always helped me with very very difficult problem.
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