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Old 07-25-2019, 02:57 PM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,935 posts, read 2,894,257 times
Reputation: 6320

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
Is that remark really necessary?

I doubt anyone uses a CPAP device if they don't absolutely need it. Indeed, compliance is a big issue with patients.
I am virtually 100% compliant. Fortunately, I sleep with my mouth shut and I use nasal pillows.
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Old 07-25-2019, 02:58 PM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,935 posts, read 2,894,257 times
Reputation: 6320
Not retired yet and finding this topic extremely helpful. Thanks to all who are responding.
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Old 07-25-2019, 03:05 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
7,829 posts, read 4,805,257 times
Reputation: 28648
Quote:
Originally Posted by ReachTheBeach View Post
I am virtually 100% compliant. Fortunately, I sleep with my mouth shut and I use nasal pillows.
I'm glad to hear that.

I'm also happy to see you in the forum again. Missed you.
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Old 07-25-2019, 03:14 PM
 
2,728 posts, read 1,562,997 times
Reputation: 2639
RE Dental Insurance

Consumers Checkbook, among others, have analyzed dental plans and found that unless your employer subsidizes the plan, they don't make financial sense. Largely, this is because they cover the small expenses well, often at 100%, and the big expenses less generously, often 50% of an allowable charge, which is often less than the preveling charges. This is the opposite of most insurance we folks carry, where, through a deductible, we pay for the small stuff while the insurance covers the big stuff.

Other plans have networks limited to dentists "willing to work for less", since the plan reimbursement rates are not very generous. In some areas, it can be hard to find a dentist who takes the plan.
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Old 07-25-2019, 03:14 PM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,935 posts, read 2,894,257 times
Reputation: 6320
Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
I'm glad to hear that.

I'm also happy to see you in the forum again. Missed you.
Thanks. I have been cycling in and out of here for several years. I start investing too much time and energy after a while, usually on stuff that has nothing to do with retirement. It's still ~4 years away but getting close enough that I need to start putting things into action. Trying to stay more focused.
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Old 07-25-2019, 03:41 PM
 
297 posts, read 1,004,887 times
Reputation: 223
Time. That's it. I thought I would have plenty of time to do things.

Was I wrong!
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Old 07-25-2019, 04:40 PM
 
2,224 posts, read 762,111 times
Reputation: 5654
Quote:
Originally Posted by bigbear99 View Post
RE Dental Insurance

Consumers Checkbook, among others, have analyzed dental plans and found that unless your employer subsidizes the plan, they don't make financial sense. Largely, this is because they cover the small expenses well, often at 100%, and the big expenses less generously, often 50% of an allowable charge, which is often less than the prevailing charges. This is the opposite of most insurance we folks carry, where, through a deductible, we pay for the small stuff while the insurance covers the big stuff.

Other plans have networks limited to dentists "willing to work for less", since the plan reimbursement rates are not very generous. In some areas, it can be hard to find a dentist who takes the plan.
Yes- there are other threads on this but note also that most plans have a limit on what they'll pay in a given year. $1,500 is typical, $2,000 or more is generous. I was thrilled when the oral surgeon's office person told me that my employer's dental insurance covered implants at 40%. Then I found out that once the cap was applied, and all previous claims for the year subtracted, there wasn't a whole lot of coverage. As a retiree I haven't bought it.
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Old 07-25-2019, 05:12 PM
 
154 posts, read 37,328 times
Reputation: 322
My Dental via my employer has a 3K cap but if planned correctly, it can be a 6K cap.


Schedule the work in December (or before) using up your 3k then it rolls to a new 3k on Jan 1st when you can complete the work.
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Old 07-25-2019, 05:23 PM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
7,272 posts, read 12,726,961 times
Reputation: 22154
Quote:
Originally Posted by ElmersGlue. View Post
My Dental via my employer has a 3K cap but if planned correctly, it can be a 6K cap.

Schedule the work in December (or before) using up your 3k then it rolls to a new 3k on Jan 1st when you can complete the work.
Sorry, but that's still a $3,000 cap per calendar year, of course. Doing what you suggested can work fine IF you have no other dental work done before December of year 1 nor after January of year 2 as all of that would have to be paid out of pocket.

Decades ago, I had my 2 bottom wisdom teeth pulled one summer (they were badly impacted and took forever to get out), then waited until January of the next year for the top 2 -- because of my calendar-year insurance coverage. Same logic, just not December/January. But you can really only do this if the dental work isn't absolutely urgent (as was the case with my top wisdom teeth).

On the other hand, your plan is pretty generous for a plan through your employer. Mine has a $1,000 cap (which seems typical) but can be a whopping $1,500 cap if you want to spend $10 per paycheck more (yep, $240/year more for the extra $500 in coverage -- it actually DOES make sense in some circumstances, but geez, what crappy and expensive coverage ).
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Old 07-25-2019, 05:56 PM
 
167 posts, read 74,317 times
Reputation: 336
Retirement? not till I am 70, and can retire with 20 years in FERS.


Definatley going to keep all my coverages from the Fed Gov.
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