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Old Today, 08:22 AM
 
Location: R.I.
1,037 posts, read 630,482 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post

The people in my life who started with a BSN from a strong school are all making way north of $100k. A couple of nurse practitioners, a nurse anesthetist, my girlfriend is a regional director on the finance side for a bunch of hospitals. Nobody has been near a bed pan since their early 20s. The only one I can think of who stayed in the trenches was a pediatric ICU nurse at Boston Childrens making into 6-figures.

I am originally an AD grad from RIJC now know as CCRI, and went right back to college after graduation at RIC to get my BSN. I have absolutely no regrets taking first the ADN path because right after graduation I got a job with the State of R.I. working at the R.I. Veterans Home 2nd shift which allowed me to earn what was considered a pretty decent income back then, could go to all my classes during the day, and pretty much the State paid for most all of my college expenses. From there I went to Roger Williams Hospital and worked on a med/surg unit for < 1 year and from there got hired to work in their ER, and pretty much for the next 20 years worked in various ERs. ER nursing is in no way an easy job, but it was exceptionally exciting for me and being an action junkie I was made for this type of nursing work. By the time I hit my early 40s I was tired of the every other weekend and holiday along with rotating shifts, and a M-F triage job came up at the VA and I ticked all the qualification boxes and was offered and accepted the job.

Over the last nearly 20 years my job got reconfigured a number of times, and pretty much now I have a case management desk job working out of Primary Care and do mostly telephone triage, chronic disease management, and coordinating homecare services. And yes I earn a salary north of $100K but much of that has to do with the fact that I have worked as an R.N. for 42 years. My former private sector ER nursing colleagues that are still working are probably earning a bit more than I, but they will not retire with a defined pension and the other benefits I will retire with working for the Feds which are very valuable to me especially my Federal BC/BS which I can and will carry into retirement.

The nursing profession of the white caps, white shoes, and metal bedpans which is part of my history has come along way since then. And never did ever imagine when I graduated in 1978 there would be such a thing as a degree called a Doctorate in Nursing. And many of those nurses who achieved that level of education would become high earning respected leaders in today's healthcare industry.
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Old Today, 09:30 AM
 
Location: R.I.
1,037 posts, read 630,482 times
Reputation: 4479
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
"Standard" med-surg RNs make $19/hr before shift differentials.

I find ^ very hard to believe. Granted I live in a higher COL area than you, but considering the non degreed CNAs and LPNs that I work with who earn considerably higher than $19/hour I don't know how your area of TN can possibly recruit and retain degreed R.N.s with that kind of pay.
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Old Today, 12:10 PM
 
1 posts
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Locally, the city schools start out at about $40,000 annually. The county schools pay a good bit less. With five years experience and an M.Ed from the nearby regional state school, that city teacher will be at $50,000. Teachers here tend to be the local natives that don't leave. Combined, two teachers will be in the top 5%-7% of HHI, and that's before you add in the value of their pensions and other government benefits.

A teacher with five years experience will likely outearn an RN with five years experience here. "Standard" med-surg RNs make $19/hr before shift differentials or alternate pay codes come into account. FNPs do not earn $100,000 here - not close, and the FNP will require more education than a typical K-12 teacher. A CRNA might, but even that might be a tall order, and most large hospital systems not affiliated with a university teaching hospital don't have the level of benefits that local and state governments do.

I was curious about this, so I checked salary.com. According the them:

---------
The average Teacher Elementary School salary in Tennessee is $52,713 as of July 30, 2019, but the range typically falls between $43,180 and $62,522.

The average Staff Nurse - RN - Emergency Room salary in Tennessee is $67,620 as of July 30, 2019, but the range typically falls between $60,390 and $75,105.

The average Nurse Practitioner salary in Tennessee is $97,335 as of July 30, 2019, but the range typically falls between $90,319 and $105,739.
---------

Also, based on personal experience, these fall about where I would have expected.
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Old Today, 12:19 PM
 
14,287 posts, read 7,630,536 times
Reputation: 26125
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightengale212 View Post
I find ^ very hard to believe. Granted I live in a higher COL area than you, but considering the non degreed CNAs and LPNs that I work with who earn considerably higher than $19/hour I don't know how your area of TN can possibly recruit and retain degreed R.N.s with that kind of pay.

My take: They only retain the bad ones who couldn't get hired in a higher COL region.



As I'm sure you know, the capability for critical thought among RNs falls on a very broad spectrum. Like any other profession, most of the capable ones move to regions with better economic opportunity.
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Old Today, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
24,068 posts, read 17,905,479 times
Reputation: 28236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nightengale212 View Post
I find ^ very hard to believe. Granted I live in a higher COL area than you, but considering the non degreed CNAs and LPNs that I work with who earn considerably higher than $19/hour I don't know how your area of TN can possibly recruit and retain degreed R.N.s with that kind of pay.
The truth is they really can't.

There is a chronic staffing shortage around here where entire wings of hospitals end up closed because there aren't enough nurses or even techs to properly staff the area. Some facility EDs frequently go on diversion due to a lack of beds and staffing. The larger EDs often have wait times over two hours - I've heard of people sitting for eight hours or more.

A CNA makes $9-$10/hr. LPNs are generally $12-$14/hr. You can make better money somewhere like Aldi or even fast food for CNAs.

If you don't have deep local ties, you just go to a better paying market.
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Old Today, 06:33 PM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,284 posts, read 2,906,599 times
Reputation: 5049
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
My take: They only retain the bad ones who couldn't get hired in a higher COL region.



As I'm sure you know, the capability for critical thought among RNs falls on a very broad spectrum. Like any other profession, most of the capable ones move to regions with better economic opportunity.
Utter baloney. Nursing education at the bachelor’s level is pretty standardized across the country. I know nurses in rural parts of the country love their jobs and community because they are the only primary care providers their patients see. They go on and get their masters so they can serve as Nurse Practitioners with prescriptive privileges...and return to their roots because it’s not always about the money.
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