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Old 08-01-2019, 07:56 PM
 
Location: Upstate NY
35,922 posts, read 10,653,745 times
Reputation: 34179

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Quote:
Originally Posted by rational1 View Post
There was a standup comic joke. Went kind of like this

"My parents lived in Brooklyn and they moved to Florida after they retired.

They didn't want to, but it's the law."

That was Jerry Seinfeld.
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Old 08-01-2019, 10:03 PM
 
21,038 posts, read 13,939,081 times
Reputation: 14678
Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
I've been to Arizona many times. I even thought i would move there.

The last time i went was in April a few years ago. We left in the morning from Texas. It was a nice chilly day.

We get there - it was horribly WARM. No way

I've only been to the panhandle of Florida. It was okay. But too humid. Even more than our south texas beaches.
New Yorkers and others from North East have been heading out west or down south to retire for decades now. Besides the climate certain states/local areas offer far better tax treatment which is a plus to those on fixed incomes.

Things really picked up by the 1970's or so when air conditioning became less of a luxury than something everyone could afford.

Films like Some Like It Hot, Cocoon, Harry and Tonto among others are all based upon or around retirement communities/retirees living in south or west.

Final thing to keep in mind is out west while temps may be hot, at least things are dry. Here in NYC summer weather can mean not only endless days of temps > 80F or >90F but humidity ranging from 70% to nearly 100%. It is the moistness and or constant damp that gets to most people, not so much the heat.

Also in desert areas while day time temps may soar, nights generally are cooler, and of course again low humidity. That makes things bearable.

OTOH much of the south, especially along the gulf is miserable both day and night thanks to the moist damp humid weather.
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Old Yesterday, 12:03 AM
 
Location: Florida Gulf Coast
4,420 posts, read 5,956,994 times
Reputation: 7159
Quote:
Originally Posted by k7baixo View Post
Picture a palmetto bug landing on your face in the middle on the night. That may help you rule out Florida.
Been here six years, never had a palmetto bug land on my face or appear in my condo. Or an alligator eat me or a sinkhole swallow me. But please, rule away, we're not begging for more people.
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Old Yesterday, 12:12 AM
 
Location: Florida Gulf Coast
4,420 posts, read 5,956,994 times
Reputation: 7159
Quote:
Originally Posted by soulsurv View Post
Never been to Arizona, but the LAST place in the country I would move to is Florida!! I don't get it at all! My 69-yr-old brother & his wife just put in an offer somewhere on the Gulf coast (about 20 minutes to the beach), and I think he's nuts!

I've been there 4 times for family things and could not WAIT to get back home to SE PA!!! Choking humidity, over-crowded, more car accidents than anywhere in the country (heard that on the radio), FIRE ANTS & a plethora of other bugs, trapped inside for half the year, mega-storms & heavy rains. NO THANKS! Give me my 4 seasons, rolling hills, top-notch healthcare, windows open and a barefoot walk on my backyard grass. An no state tax on SS.
Philly area is not box of chocolates with the humidity either. I was up there (I'm from there) in October and the humidity was worse than FL plus it was gray and foggy. You've had quite a few stretches of blazing hot/humid weather this summer that was hotter than Florida's. I feel the same way you do when I'm up there, I can't wait to get back to the Sunshine State! And our windows are open while yours are closed in the winter, so it balances out. I do agree with you on the healthcare, which is why I still come up to Philly to go to my dentist. I'm sure your brother (same age as me!) and his wife will enjoy our beautiful Gulf coast.
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Old Yesterday, 04:50 AM
 
14,123 posts, read 7,533,997 times
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I’d point out that the thread title isn’t correct. Most retirees don’t move to Florida or Arizona. A recent AARP survey reports that 77% want to stay in their home in their community as long as possible. The same survey says that only half think they’ll be able to stay. If you can’t afford your house and your town, you move somewhere cheaper.
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Old Yesterday, 05:06 AM
 
Location: Kennett Square, PA
1,701 posts, read 2,619,456 times
Reputation: 2614
Quote:
Originally Posted by Avalon08 View Post
Philly area is not box of chocolates with the humidity either. I was up there (I'm from there) in October and the humidity was worse than FL plus it was gray and foggy. You've had quite a few stretches of blazing hot/humid weather this summer that was hotter than Florida's. I feel the same way you do when I'm up there, I can't wait to get back to the Sunshine State! And our windows are open while yours are closed in the winter, so it balances out. I do agree with you on the healthcare, which is why I still come up to Philly to go to my dentist. I'm sure your brother (same age as me!) and his wife will enjoy our beautiful Gulf coast.
It's true we have had unusual humidity the last couple of years - but it's mostly July & August. I don't mind the winters at all. While shoveling snow is something I'll have to hire out in the future, it's worth the beauty & the smell of the crisp, clean air. I'm one of these people who doesn't even put on a sweater unless it's below 40 degrees. Luckily, we only have to put up with the super-intense heat for about 2.5 months, if that.

Yes, friends & family have moved to your Sunshine state, but I just can't imagine it - ESPECIALLY as I am a large dog owner (Doberman & Collie) whose canine companions NEED TO RUN in their large back yards. I can't imagine us playing frisbee with with the fear of fire ants lurking throughout the yard...what a NIGHTMARE that would be for us.

I am going to work 1 more year & then hope to retire to Lancaster County. There, the residents actually have the last say on the building of housing communities which is why there is still a great deal of unspoiled green space. ALSO: U of Penn has taken over their main hospital.

I hope my brother does indeed enjoy his choice of the Gulf coast, as long as he's careful: flesh-eating bacteria isn't my idea of a party. https://www.miamiherald.com/news/loc...233259169.html
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Old Yesterday, 06:37 AM
 
Location: Upstate, NY
628 posts, read 268,405 times
Reputation: 780
Default Why not New Mexico?

I’m curious why Arizona became the go-to state vs New Mexico. I’ve never been to either place, but New Mexico is actually more centrally located than Arizona and is just west of Texas and south of Colorado. Aren’t the climates very similar?
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Old Yesterday, 06:56 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,467 posts, read 1,694,427 times
Reputation: 8832
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
I’d point out that the thread title isn’t correct. Most retirees don’t move to Florida or Arizona. A recent AARP survey reports that 77% want to stay in their home in their community as long as possible. The same survey says that only half think they’ll be able to stay. If you can’t afford your house and your town, you move somewhere cheaper.
I’ll also point out the thread title is “why do seniors move to Florida and Arizona”. It doesn’t say all, or even most, just asking why seniors make that particular choice.

When people can no longer afford their town, usually because of increasing taxes, they look elsewhere for a more affordable area with a lesser tax burden. The cost of the many safety nets that helps others is forcing people who are not well off or poor enough to move to more affordable areas. That’s the paradox that faces the half that won’t be able to stay in place: they move away from a safety net they can’t afford at this point in time to areas with lesser safety nets they may have need of in the future.

Watch the red dot (center of population) move through the years on the C-D map below. It’s accelerated south in the past few decades. The space needed for more growth, warmer weather, and lesser tax burdens may be a few of the many reasons.


http://youtube.com/watch?v=BaANNepo3h8

Last edited by jean_ji; Yesterday at 08:10 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 07:15 AM
 
Location: Washington State
18,887 posts, read 9,728,259 times
Reputation: 16102
Quote:
Originally Posted by dcfas View Post
Iím curious why Arizona became the go-to state vs New Mexico. Iíve never been to either place, but New Mexico is actually more centrally located than Arizona and is just west of Texas and south of Colorado. Arenít the climates very similar?
Climates in both states vary dramatically based on elevations primarily. New Mexico to me seems a bit run down and third worldish while Arizona seems modern and clean....that's the biggest difference I see in the 2 states.
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Old Yesterday, 10:17 AM
 
Location: East Millcreek
2,412 posts, read 5,280,392 times
Reputation: 2697
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal_Native View Post
The other question is the validity of the question. How many people actually move? Not many, probably less than 10%.
You're moving away from family, friends, kids, grand kids, familiarities, doctors, etc.
It costs 8%-10% of the price of your house to move. There's also the possibility of a capital gains hit.

More baby boomers stay in their homes as they reach retirement, skipping downsizing
So moving to/from $500k costs between $40k-$50K?. That's a very very expensive move.
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