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Old 07-28-2019, 11:21 PM
 
Location: Idaho
4,671 posts, read 4,508,621 times
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I am really the "odd duck". After a lifetime lived in SoCal, I moved to North Idaho for my retirement years. After two winters here, I'm finding that I love it! I cannot imagine living anywhere else.

The snow and ice have not slowed me down, (well, except for not being able to ride my bicycle on the roads). Three season cycling is replaced by cross country skiing and snowshoeing in the wintertime. Sometimes fat biking.

If a northern Rocky Mountain state didn't work out for me, I would have probably relocated to the mountains of central Arizona. Not Flagstaff, (which I consider a "zoo"). Probably closer to Payson.
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Old Yesterday, 04:15 AM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,951 posts, read 2,899,279 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal_Native View Post
ya but... in AZ and probably FL you're pretty much stuck inside late spring to early fall because of the heat about the same amount of time you'd be stuck inside in the midwest or northeast because of the cold.
You're just trading one miserable season for another.
That's not true for everyone and the coast is not as bad as the interior. The Villages has an odd location, IMO - way down toward the south end but not close to the coast. Sarasota has hit 100 only once since they started keeping records. Anyway, in the shade and/or with a sea breeze I am okay with 90s. It's not like I am going to be roofing houses in the sun. And I have been down there many times in the summer.

Also, as others have mentioned, arthritis a factor for me. A very big factor. Mine has gotten a lot worse the last few years, but it's bearable and I can be pretty active when it's warm. Air conditioning bothers it. I keep a small heater under my desk and even run it in the summer. I think one reason I like humidity is that it makes warming faster when I come out of indoor locations that people want cooler than I do.

Last edited by ReachTheBeach; Yesterday at 04:41 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 04:19 AM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,951 posts, read 2,899,279 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by E-Twist View Post
I live in Oregon, but I love Arizona, too. Maybe not for the summer months, but the rest of the time I find the weather very pleasant, and there's lots to do. I don't like Florida. The humidity is awful. Then again, people from the East coast are used to higher humidity. Too many bugs in Florida, too.
Also coastal and non coastal. People in mid America usually seem to enjoy the beach but few of them seem drawn to it enough to want to live there. Some do; my generalization is obviously not universal.
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Old Yesterday, 04:27 AM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,951 posts, read 2,899,279 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal_Native View Post
Same place they get the idea Chicago is cold. Chicago is further south than balmy and mild Rome Italy.
Look up average winter temperatures. From December through February, Rome's average is 20 degrees warmer than Chicago, so people get that idea because it's true.
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Old Yesterday, 05:01 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
4,882 posts, read 4,997,623 times
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I grew up in Phoenix.

Old people are attracted to snowless winters, dry air and heat. The HEAT I don't get. I moved to Colorado in 1977 partially to escape Arizona summers.

The best deal is to live in Phoenix from Nov to March and to a cooler place for summers. For that cooler place, my mother used to join us here in Colorado Springs.
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Old Yesterday, 05:12 AM
 
Location: Arizona
5,987 posts, read 5,341,064 times
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You can golf everyday.

When it is 113 that is afternoon. It isn't that hot when you get up. When you see the high temps for Phoenix I golf on those days but it is only in the 90's when I play.

90's in Arizona aren't the same as 90's in other places. Much less humid. I have had people visit me in August and they can't believe that it isn't as bad as they thought.

Mid afternoon for several months is like walking into a hairdryer when you go outside. But you are only walking to and from your air conditioned car.

Joints feel better than ever and I am older than ever before.

People that hate Arizona are usually the ones that like to sleep in. Things happen earlier here. Most people I know are up with the sun. Lots of dog walkers at 5:30 am. Stores open earlier here. I can go for breakfast at 4am.

For some of the season college football starts at 9am and NFL at 10 am. Monday Night Football is earlier and you can go out and have dinner while you watch the game. That is one thing I really liked when I moved here. Sports on TV are at a better time.

We don't change our clocks!

But...…...If I still worked this is probably be the last place I would want to live.
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Old Yesterday, 05:41 AM
 
Location: Minnesota
1,581 posts, read 1,359,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Simple and quick answer for the most part is because they are still affordable for many and have warm winters or winters that are mostly without snow.
Then you divide the two states between people that don't mind humidity and those that prefer dry air. There you have it in a nutshell.
That's a very good concise answer....good job!

I have a friend who moved from the upper Midwest to Arizona about 6 or 7 years ago. We also frequent Arizona (and will probably live there when retired) when vacationing, so I usually stop in to see him. I asked him after he'd been there a few years....why did you move here? I loved his answer...he pondered the question for a few seconds and said "because you don't have to shovel heat, and you rarely slip and fall due to heat".

Depends on how you look at and tolerate cold and snow. It can be great for recreating if you ski, snowmobile, build snowman and even if you just enjoy curling up with a good book in front of the fireplace on a cold winter day....but let's face it, most of us don't live that life the majority of the time. We have to function in it for less pleasurable activities most often....like work, running errands, home maintenance, shoveling the walks/driveway before going to work, and perhaps immediately upon coming home. And....."skiing" when you're in your car commuting to/from work, or walking down the sidewalk isn't all that much fun, and can be very painful and expensive.

Personally I don't understand loving humidity....but I'm glad some do, otherwise the Arizona would be overrun if you added in all the Florida people.
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Old Yesterday, 05:50 AM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,951 posts, read 2,899,279 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Simple and quick answer for the most part is because they are still affordable for many and have warm winters or winters that are mostly without snow.
Then you divide the two states between people that don't mind humidity and those that prefer dry air. There you have it in a nutshell.
Living at or near the ocean is also a big factor for a few people. The pull of the ocean gets stronger if you have it and haven't satisfied it. The NE coast is bone chilling much of the year.
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Old Yesterday, 05:53 AM
 
12,129 posts, read 5,204,640 times
Reputation: 19262
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasper1372 View Post
That's a very good concise answer....good job!

I have a friend who moved from the upper Midwest to Arizona about 6 or 7 years ago. We also frequent Arizona (and will probably live there when retired) when vacationing, so I usually stop in to see him. I asked him after he'd been there a few years....why did you move here? I loved his answer...he pondered the question for a few seconds and said "because you don't have to shovel heat, and you rarely slip and fall due to heat".

Depends on how you look at and tolerate cold and snow. It can be great for recreating if you ski, snowmobile, build snowman and even if you just enjoy curling up with a good book in front of the fireplace on a cold winter day....but let's face it, most of us don't live that life the majority of the time. We have to function in it for less pleasurable activities most often....like work, running errands, home maintenance, shoveling the walks/driveway before going to work, and perhaps immediately upon coming home. And....."skiing" when you're in your car commuting to/from work, or walking down the sidewalk isn't all that much fun, and can be very painful and expensive.

Personally I don't understand loving humidity....but I'm glad some do, otherwise the Arizona would be overrun if you added in all the Florida people.
I don't think it's so much about loving humidity as it is about loving lack of humidity in Arizona. If you want green all around you, water, rain, then you tolerate the humidity to have that. If you want dry air, mountain vistas,you tolerate the extreme heat in parts of Arizona. Yes it is extreme heat no matter how much some people want to pretend it's not. You may tolerate it well, but it's still extreme heat even without humidity.

Last edited by marino760; Yesterday at 06:24 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 06:42 AM
 
Location: On the road
6,033 posts, read 2,933,256 times
Reputation: 11616
Quote:
Originally Posted by mike1003 View Post
FL is weather and state taxes

No idea why anyone would move to AZ, avg to high taxes and burning hot summers
Both Arizona and Florida are uncomfortably hot for a few months in the summer.

I've lived in both, and much prefer Arizona because it's far more geographically diverse, and IMO much prettier than Florida. We used to drive two hours north on the summer weekends (from Phoenix) up to the rim to go camping/fishing where the weather was much cooler in the mountain forests. In the winter we'd camp in the desert right outside Phoenix, in desert environments far more beautiful than any campsite I've seen in Florida.


Quote:
Originally Posted by Clemencia53 View Post
The lack of trees in Arizona and the forests don't count (lol) is not for me.
Arizona is not the Sahara Desert. The northern part of the state:






The southern part is desert but it's the relatively lush Sonoran Desert:

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