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Old Yesterday, 01:48 PM
 
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Losing things, be it a loved one, one's health or even one's mind is not limited to retirement. There's nothing special about voluntarily stopping work that correlates or is causative with someone else's well-being or lack.

Most people tend to be at or over the age of 60 by the time they retire and age has a way of catching up and kicking butt for some. But that's true even if a person continues to work full-time and never plans to quit.
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Old Yesterday, 02:05 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GypsyPeak View Post
For my wife and I, just the fact that we are getting to the age where friends are starting to pass. Some have literally been "here today, gone tomorrow". It is kind of a shock when it happens.



For my pension, I was given a choice at retirement of "getting it all" or taking a reduced pension in order to provide survivor's benefits for my wife. I chose the latter of course.
As did I, it was about a 9% reduction but well worth it , she continues with my pension and health insurance for life
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Old Yesterday, 02:13 PM
 
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Originally Posted by germaine2626 View Post
If your husband is not retired yet, he should check to see if he can sign up for his pension to continue to you after his death.
It's not his choice to make. In accordance with the Retirement Equity Act of 1984, a spousal survivor benefit is the default option for pensions covered by ERISA. It's the spouse, not the employee, who has the choice of whether to elect for the pension to continue after the employee's death, or to waive that entitlement.
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Old Yesterday, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,454 posts, read 54,875,243 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lottamoxie View Post
Losing things, be it a loved one, one's health or even one's mind is not limited to retirement. There's nothing special about voluntarily stopping work that correlates or is causative with someone else's well-being or lack.

Most people tend to be at or over the age of 60 by the time they retire and age has a way of catching up and kicking butt for some. But that's true even if a person continues to work full-time and never plans to quit.
All true in a Captain Obvious kind of way, but irrelevant to the thread. The OP specifically asked what the worst thing is that has happened to others in retirement. People are responding to the question.
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Old Yesterday, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Florida -
8,785 posts, read 10,896,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NYgal1542 View Post
Biggest issue for me is my eye health. I have glaucoma which has been treated with various eye-drops, laser surgery, surgery, more drops, more laser, more surgery. Will have more surgery this Friday.

Very thankful I can still see. Very thankful for doctors who are helping me.
We retired 10+-years ago, knowing my wife had macular degeration --- and not knowing how long her eyesight would last. Her mother was all but, blind for the last several years of her life. In response, we started traveling ... early and often --- and have probably taken a dozen or so cruises, with two 30-day jaunts to the Mediterranean. We also moved closer to the grandkids, whom she has enjoyed greatly for the past several years. During that time, she's sewn MANY quilts, while I've enjoyed writing.

Her sight is decreasing, but, our lives are still bright and hopeful! We've been blessed with how long her sight has lasted, with a happy family, with 51-years together ... We, our children and our grandchildren are happy IN THE LORD! Regardless of what befalls us in this temporary life -- we'll be okay!
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Old Yesterday, 02:29 PM
 
432 posts, read 75,332 times
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No more fooling around with the secretaries at work.
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Old Yesterday, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Haiku
4,207 posts, read 2,620,260 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by germaine2626 View Post
If your husband is not retired yet, he should check to see if he can sign up for his pension to continue to you after his death. In my case, I signed up for my pension to continue for the rest of his life, if I died first. I received a little less per month (probably about $50 less) but even if I died the day after I retired and he lived to 105 he would still get the monthly pension check.
Yes, most pensions have an option for a spousal beneficiary but the amount of reduction is significant, at least for DW. Her pension would have been about 25% less. We assessed our family longevity and our other finances and decided to not take the spousal beneficiary option. If I outlive DW I will be OK financially but I really doubt I will outlive her. The far bigger problem is the tax hit if/when one of us dies - filing single will put the survivor in a higher bracket with less of a deduction. That is going to hurt.
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Old Yesterday, 02:40 PM
 
8,246 posts, read 11,962,429 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HollyhockGarden View Post
We all go through the pages of life, it is inevitable. What would you say has been the worst event/thing that has happened to you (or spouse) since you retired?
Mine would be being diagnosed two years ago with stage 4 cancer in my mediastinum, with additional tumors in three of the four chambers of my heart. My PCP recently informed my wife and me that neither my oncologist nor my cardiologist thought I was going to survive. (And it's a good thing that they withheld that info from me because I probably would have quit going through chemotherapy at my lowest point during my third month of infusions.)


Quote:
Originally Posted by HollyhockGarden View Post
Any good come of it?
After all my hair fell out, my dermatologist found an early (in situ) melanoma on my scalp. So, I guess that was good, lol.

The other good thing, is that I'm not taking any future for granted. Now that I'm in remission, rather than taking one or two international trips a year and saving certain locations for a "later" that may not arrive, we're going to travel as often as we can. Already, we have trips scheduled for Ireland in September and October, Copenhagen for two weeks in December for Christmas, Singapore in February, Dubai and Abu Dhabi in March, Florence for a month in May/June, and Montreal for a week in July. As we start working though these trips, we'll schedule more on the back end.
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Old Yesterday, 02:50 PM
 
Location: Florida
4,400 posts, read 3,738,344 times
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Using a street in an over 55 community that is about 5 years old you can expect about 20 or 25% of the retires having problems such as spouses death or very serious sickness or life changes that causes you to move again. The point is there is a big risk that your retirement may not go as planned so build in some safeguards for unplanned problems.
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Old Yesterday, 02:52 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
17,161 posts, read 17,478,115 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MadManofBethesda View Post
It's not his choice to make. In accordance with the Retirement Equity Act of 1984, a spousal survivor benefit is the default option for pensions covered by ERISA. It's the spouse, not the employee, who has the choice of whether to elect for the pension to continue after the employee's death, or to waive that entitlement.
My pension must have been different. I do not recall my spouse ever being asked by my employer what he wanted with my pension or to sign any paperwork. I was the one given the paperwork and I was the one who designated and signed what I wanted to do with my public employee pension (in 2009).

My friend must also not have been covered by that act. He really, really wanted his wife to sign up for survivor benefits for him on her private company pension but she refused, even though they had been married 45 years at that time. This was about 2014.

I have never heard of a situation where the spouse of worker decides on the workers pension. I guess that you learn something new everyday.
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