U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old Yesterday, 06:56 PM
 
Location: EPWV
11,117 posts, read 6,231,352 times
Reputation: 12288

Advertisements

Well for us that would depend on what is on the list and what coupons and/or store weekly sales for item/s we would use. There's only 2 of us. I don't eat as much as I used to and think hubby cut back some. One week it could be $45.00 and another week, possibly close to $100. Then, sometimes you hear about some new food and just want to try it, like yesterday I love lemon and lime seasonings and then there's this seafood urge Damn advertising
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old Yesterday, 07:17 PM
 
Location: Tijuana Exurbs
4,014 posts, read 10,473,505 times
Reputation: 4750
Household of 1.

For food only, I spend about $175 a month. There is very little alcohol in that because I only buy wine for cooking and then drinking.

Packaged food items are few and far between, other than some canned and frozen fruits and vegetables. Soda, cookies, potato chips, crackers, and breakfast cereal are purchased a few times a year.

My budget has been helped by the opening of a nearby Grocery Outlet Bargain Market. Their apples are consistently good, so good that I've started eating apples again after giving up in frustration with other supermarket apples.

For toiletries and cleaning supplies, since I buy those is in sporadic bunches, I would guess an additional $25/month.

Restaurant meals are very rare. Who wants to go to a restaurant and eat alone?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
7,917 posts, read 4,845,133 times
Reputation: 29000
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I spend more money than some people on certain things; for example, I have a nice, new grocery store that has all sorts of pre-cooked foods. They have meal deals, and one of them is four vegetables that you can choose from about a dozen, already pre-cooked and sometimes with certain seasonings (spinach with garlic, for example, and carrots with sweet chili sauce). I'll get that four-vegetable meal deal for $7.00, but I will eat it three times, either as just veggies for lunch or with a piece of fish or something. I know some who people will leap up and shriek about how you can make it cheaper at home, but I'm not going to waste my time cooking a large amount of four different vegetables just for myself to save a dollar or two, so it's worth it to me to buy the cooked food.
You realize you just destroyed your last smidgen of home-cooking cred. Bold move.

I'm inspired by your example. Think I'll go to Starbucks for my morning coffee tomorrow. Then I'll buy an overpriced pastry to go with my overpriced joe and tip the barista lavishly...deducting a quarter for each tattoo and piercing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 09:49 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,510 posts, read 54,907,924 times
Reputation: 67151
Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
You realize you just destroyed your last smidgen of home-cooking cred. Bold move.

I'm inspired by your example. Think I'll go to Starbucks for my morning coffee tomorrow. Then I'll buy an overpriced pastry to go with my overpriced joe and tip the barista lavishly...deducting a quarter for each tattoo and piercing.

HAHAHA, you have a party there at Starbucks. I don't drink that swill. And I don't do pastries. Gotta watch that blood sugar. I eat oatmeal or boiled eggs generally, which yes, I do make at home. Boiling water doesn't get you home-cooking cred to begin with.

I don't care much about cooking. In another life, I loved to cook, read cookbooks for entertainment, followed Pierre Franey's and James Beard's columns, had friends over, threw barbecues, and when people invited me to their barbecues, my potato salad was requested. I don't even like potato salad, but people love mine. And I shopped all sales and used coupons and froze stuff that I bought in large quantities.

But that was in another galaxy far away called married and raising a kid and trying to survive. Through long years of working long days, I lost my desire to cook except occasionally when someone else is there to share the meal. If I can get four good servings of cooked vegetables for 7 bucks and get three meals out of them, I'm OK with not winning the "I lost an hour of my life but saved 43 cents!" trophy.
__________________
Moderator posts are in RED.
City-Data Terms of Service: http://www.city-data.com/terms.html
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 11:26 PM
 
4,433 posts, read 909,985 times
Reputation: 2479
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBCjunkie View Post
I am confused. I have always thought the 'attraction' of Walmart is that they supposedly sell things at a lower price than at other places??

Truly puzzled because I've never heard Walmart referred to as being "high priced" for anything.

Here in the northeast the independent grocery places are usually more expensive than either the normal supermarkets or the volume retailers like Target, KMart, Walmart, etc
If you have an Aldi's in the area, compare the prices there to Walmart. You will be shocked. If in Canada, compare a NoFrills in the smaller towns, to Walmart. Again, you will be shocked.

Walmart groceries are not cheap. Some, and I mean SOME of their generic brands like wheat crackers can be competitive.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 07:59 AM
 
1,732 posts, read 606,766 times
Reputation: 3241
Quote:
Originally Posted by normstad View Post
If you have an Aldi's in the area, compare the prices there to Walmart. You will be shocked.
I have to say, I've only been in a Walmart a few times and each was because I was with a friend who wanted to buy something there. And each time it was a complete turnoff, the stores are frankly depressing and messy. Apparently in other parts of the country (from what I've read) there are "nice" Walmart stores but the ones here are clearly geared to - and all located adjacent to - lower income and minority communities.....and it shows. I'd rather spend a little more and go to Target which is not only closer but a far more pleasant shopping experience, well lit, well stocked and neat, nice wide aisles, etc. In fact they have been 'redecorating' the Targets in this area to make them even more upscale-looking. But I don't go to Target for food other than my Quaker Old Fashioned Oatmeal for which they have the best price at $3.99

I have seen a few Aldi's in passing but never went in. None are as convenient as the much closer Whole Foods and Stop & Shop stores that I regularly shop in. I'm assuming that Aldi's is comparable to Best Market which was recently bought out by Lidl; if so, it's likely to follow the pattern of all small grocery chains and indie stores and be more expensive than my regular stops.

If I'm going to be in Whole Foods twice a week to buy Bell & Evans chicken, it makes no sense for me to drive 8 miles out of my way (the location of the nearest Aldi's as per their site) just to pay 20 cents less for a container of Lactaid or $1 less per pound for three zucchini. I'd waste more in gas than I would save by going there. Whereas the Whole Foods is 2 miles from my house and 1/2 mile from the post office I go to every day and the gas station I always use.

Sometimes it's not all about the price, it's about convenience (time and gas) too. Although I can see that for people who buy a lot of food, especially all at one time, it can be worth it. But for a single person who only buys and uses small quantities of specific things on a continuing basis, sometimes spending a little more actually ends up costing less.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 08:40 AM
 
12,147 posts, read 5,218,555 times
Reputation: 19362
Looks like I way overestimated my monthly food expenses when I first replied. I just got back from the grocery store and bought everything I needed for the week including cat food and a couple other non food items. I spent just under $60 so my monthly total should have been about $250 for one person a month.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 08:45 AM
 
8,802 posts, read 10,901,276 times
Reputation: 12872
About 340/month for 2. We don't eat beef, pork or turkey though. No desserts except chocolate and cookies, seldom eating out. Simple eating w/ lots of vegies/fruits. Food just seems like it's getting higher to me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 08:52 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,841 posts, read 17,744,737 times
Reputation: 27890
Quote:
Originally Posted by normstad View Post
You must by a lot of processed and packaged food. I spent MAX $160/month, but I only buy fresh veggies and fruit, beans, lentils, some diary, and meat when it is on sale, usually chicken or pork loins. But then I also bulk up on sale items, coffee, toilet paper, oatmeal etc. and some of that may last months until the next sale. As a couple, I can't see spending more than $300/month as wastage would be less.

Also, be careful where you shop. Aldi's is my go to, and rarely do I go to a Walmart which is way more expensive, and there are only two items I will buy in Publix, their lime sparkling water which is excellent, and occasionally one of their subs.

Hosting friends and families certainly would add to a bill, but preparing food yourself rather than buying it saves $100's over the year.
That's basically $5/day/person. That's not a lot of money.

Pork loin here is about $2/lb at Sam's, more at the grocery store. Boneless, skinless chicken breast is around $2.50/lb. As bad as they are for you, I love cold cuts. You can't get fresh roast beef at the grocery store for under $10/lb - even "budget meats" like bologna, salami, and pepperoni are $7-$9/lb. Good beef bologna is about $8/lb.

I like sandwiches with veggies on them. I don't want Oscar Meyer bologna on plain white bread. Veggies cost money. I usually get something like Sara Lee honey wheat bread. That's more expensive than store brand equivalent Wonder bread.

Aldi has some things I like, but they are not a full service grocer in the sense that Kroger, Publix, or even Walmart is.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Today, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Mammoth Lakes, CA
3,196 posts, read 6,971,681 times
Reputation: 7548
My husband and I are spending about $450 a month for the both of us. That includes food, pet food and household items. All of that is about $375 and we spend $75 a month on alcohol. Grand total $450.

I'm surprised some of you are spending $1,000 a month. Good for you guys, you must be eating like royalty!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top