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Old Today, 04:50 AM
 
72,224 posts, read 72,173,749 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harpoonalt View Post
I agree. My point is that people just save every nickel and forget to enjoy the extra. Without a PLAN, they deny themselves in the effort to extract every penny of gain or savings. Make a plan to ensure your old age, then take what's leftover and enjoy it. I see too many people so focused on the end that they forget to live NOW.
People rarely change from how they are during the working years .

To many, having money represents financial security , power , independence, comfort ...they like money for the sake of having it ,not for the things money can buy...they love looking at their net worth sheet.

Others like money for spending , they want more to spend more

Others like my old boss likes the art of the deal ...he has a company doing 100 million a year yet he is motivated by deals and buying more companies .
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Old Today, 05:00 AM
 
29,910 posts, read 34,970,994 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harpoonalt View Post
I agree. My point is that people just save every nickel and forget to enjoy the extra. Without a PLAN, they deny themselves in the effort to extract every penny of gain or savings. Make a plan to ensure your old age, then take what's leftover and enjoy it. I see too many people so focused on the end that they forget to live NOW.
Sure that makes sense. The challenge is figuring how much the extra will be not just when you first start out in retirement but down the road say 10,15,20,25,30,35 years worth. That's the trick how much will I need to be able to enjoy for that long and how to structure that effort.
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Old Today, 05:10 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
7,881 posts, read 4,828,192 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by harpoonalt View Post
Life isn't always about numbers. The takeaway is that for all the planning and calculating you do, you're still here sucking air and vertical and should enjoy the ride. At 60, I've seen more than my fair share of friends, relatives and loved ones who said, one day we'll do this or that. Too many never got the chance.

I find it kinda funny that the people who do "enjoy the ride" are excoriated by others in this forum for blowing through their money.
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Old Today, 05:12 AM
 
Location: northern New England
2,518 posts, read 1,098,352 times
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My dad died at 66, but he had retired at 55 (federal gov't career). He got a lot of enjoyment out of those ten years, traveling, volunteering, dancing. I'm so glad he didn't wait until 65 to retire.
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Old Today, 05:18 AM
 
4,467 posts, read 2,645,302 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ysr_racer View Post
He died in his sleep on Sunday night. Never got one day of retirement, never got one penny of social security.

Time waits for no man.
So?

What is your point?

I died at work in the '90s, after 7mins 40 secs they were successful the 4th time shocking my heart, but had it not worked, i would not be here. (Anaphylactic shock due to allergic reaction to a sulfa antibiotic resulting in my heart stopping and death). So I'm already on "borrowed time ".

My 30 yr old cousin was murdered in a holdup.

My best friend's son hanged himself at age 24.

My mother passed at age 59 from a devastating disease.

None of them got to retire or collect SS.

The ONLY guarantee in life IS......death will come. Sooner or later will all depend.

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Old Today, 05:40 AM
 
Location: R.I.
1,005 posts, read 615,259 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
People rarely change from how they are during the working years .

To many, having money represents financial security , power , independence, comfort ...they like money for the sake of having it ,not for the things money can buy...they love looking at their net worth sheet.

Others like money for spending , they want more to spend more

Others like my old boss likes the art of the deal ...he has a company doing 100 million a year yet he is motivated by deals and buying more companies .

I agree with what you said and additionally so much of how we view and do with money that conditioning starts in our childhood often either taking on the money traits of our parents or trying to do just the opposite.

Both my parents were dirt poor Depression era kids, and when they started to have more income than expenses my father fell into your category # 1 and my mother # 2. Being polar opposites when it came to money it amazed me they stay married until death do us part.

Taking on as their child some traits of both parents, that resulted in me going through spurts of stealth saving then stealth spending while single. It wasn't until I married my late husband who leaned more like my father that I learned from him better skills to balance saving and spending money. And those skills would come in very handy after he passed being again a single person with nobody but me monitoring the bank accounts.
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Old Today, 05:42 AM
 
6 posts, read 630 times
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Even at age 60 the number of people I have known that have already passed is growing. A variety of causes, heart attacks, pancreatic cancer, ALS, drugs, suicide. It is shocking. Although I agree with the enjoying life part, I know there is another horror that could await. Being old and poor. There is nothing wrong with focusing on financials as part of preparing for retirement. It will do no good to enjoy a few years, realize you are broke and wind up working the fry-a-lator in a Burger King. So yes, enjoy life but put something aside so you can retire in dignity.
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Old Today, 05:45 AM
 
2,252 posts, read 773,293 times
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I married my dear second husband when I was 50 and he was 65. I think that gave me perspective. We loved travel and I knew that if we saved all the good trips for when I retired at 65, he'd be 80. No guarantees.

So, every year we took at least one "big" trip, typically to Europe. We took more in the years when we flew Coach but it was getting hard on DH, who was over 6 feet tall and had back problems. Fortunately I traveled enough on business that we could typically use miles, hotel points or both.

I ended up retiring at 61 and we got in few couple more good trips (Alaska, Iceland and Paris) before he died when I was 64. I'm grateful that we managed the good balance between living for today and saving for tomorrow.
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Old Today, 06:42 AM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,965 posts, read 2,902,156 times
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I am trying to do more of my "someday" things while I am still healthy enough and while I am working. It's not like you can only do one or the other. IMO, finding the right job situation where that's possible is easier that retiring early with enough money to be able to do the things you want in retirement and be prepared for the possibility of a long life.
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Old Today, 06:45 AM
 
Location: Vermont
1,032 posts, read 1,428,019 times
Reputation: 2043
Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
I find it kinda funny that the people who do "enjoy the ride" are excoriated by others in this forum for blowing through their money.
LOL. To each is own, but everyone has their thing. I've had decent cars, motorcycles, put in an inground pool in our last house, paid for our kids college and built our dreamhouse and listened to that over and over. Wife and I still retired at 60, and plan to do even more. We have little debt, a healthy portfolio, and intend to enjoy the crap out of it.
My mom died in a car accident in her 50's, relatives, co-workers and loved ones have died too young or have been incapacitated. A good friend was pretty frugal bordering on cheap. In his late 40's he had a brain tumor, spent a few years recovering from his surgery and is still not 100%. He still will retire on time, but his outlook has changed 180 degrees. He's never home and as he says, wringing every bit of life out of his day.
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