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Old Yesterday, 09:45 AM
 
29,957 posts, read 35,002,566 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
You still get prejudice/class envy/resentment in a diverse place. My census tract has two distinct neighborhoods. There's a very obvious socioeconomic class difference. Some people have mutual respect. Others don't.



I'd be 100% a fish out of water in a totally working class town. My friends are largely like me. I can talk physics and engineering with my physics prof friend at the local university. I can talk about trips to Europe because my friends have all been there. I can talk about skiing and sailing because my friends all do at least one of those. As I wrote up-thread, if I don't know someone's socioeconomic status, I talk about Mookie not hitting .300 this year and the lousy pitching or how they're going to replace Gronk now that he's retired. It's really limiting.
You have to be conscious of local/regional dialect/accent. Some might find it easier to understand a different accent when spoken by a better educated person.
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Old Yesterday, 09:56 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,609 posts, read 6,483,219 times
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My mom used to live near a working class neighborhood, her neighborhood was a 7-up delivery guy. Nice and pie. I gave him a frozen turkey once and he gave me a case of 7-up. My sister threw her newspaper out and he came out to take it. She noticed it and the next time, she brought the paper over to him. He watched our for her house and alerted her of strangers. He eventually moved away after his daughter graduated from college in San Diego.
Really there’s working class and there’s working class. I think we are working stiff until we retire and we became investment class people, people who live of investments. That’s how I see the difference.
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Old Yesterday, 12:33 PM
 
2,125 posts, read 896,556 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
...

I’d have a tough time living in a place that is completely working class. There aren’t many neutral topics that wouldn’t trigger some class envy. Sports crosses the socioeconomic boundaries. Patriots, Red Sox, Celtics, and Bruins talk are safe. Beyond that, there isn’t much common ground. My worldview is totally different.
Why would you have to discuss anything with your neighbors other than "good morning" or "hi"? What are the socioeconomic boundaries? Why would you exchange worldviews? If you are retired, how would they know what class you are in? I've been here 11 years and the only things I have discussed with neighbors is the weather and our dogs. People are making "working class" sound like uneducated welfare recipients and/or drug addicts drinking beer in a front yard full of rusted car parts and throwing the empties into the street. To me working class means basically manual labor, house painters, construction workers, landscapers, metal workers, truck drivers, bus drivers, mechanics, carpenters, restaurant workers, warehousemen, utility workers, sanitation men, dock workers, factory workers, super market checkers and stockers, etc. These people don't have degrees but make a good living, have nice homes and drive new or well kept older cars. At least in New Jersey. Maybe in other parts of the country it means something like a slum? Should be easy enough to drive through a neighborhood and tell the difference between the two.

Last edited by bobspez; Yesterday at 12:50 PM..
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Old Yesterday, 12:53 PM
 
14,133 posts, read 7,546,700 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobspez View Post
Why would you have to discuss anything with your neighbors other than "good morning" or "hi"? What are the socioeconomic boundaries? Why would you exchange worldviews? If you are retired, how would they know what class you are in? I've been here 11 years and the only things I have discussed with neighbors is the weather and our dogs. People are making "working class" sound like uneducated welfare recipients and/or drug addicts drinking beer in a front yard full of rusted car parts and throwing the empties into the street. To me working class means basically manual labor, house painters, construction workers, landscapers, metal workers, truck drivers, bus drivers, mechanics, carpenters, restaurant workers, warehousemen, utility workers, sanitation men, dock workers, factory workers, super market checkers and stockers, etc. These people don't have degrees but make a good living, have nice homes and drive new or well kept older cars. At least in New Jersey. Maybe in other parts of the country it means something like a slum? Should be easy enough to drive through a neighborhood and tell the difference between the two.
So you’re going to move at least several hours to a low cost working class place where you don’t know a soul and your only interaction with your new community is “good morning” and “hi”?

No thanks. I have no plans to become a hermit.
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Old Yesterday, 01:00 PM
 
Location: SoCal
13,609 posts, read 6,483,219 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
So you’re going to move at least several hours to a low cost working class place where you don’t know a soul and your only interaction with your new community is “good morning” and “hi”?

No thanks. I have no plans to become a hermit.
That’s all we do in California. Wave and say hi.
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Old Yesterday, 02:05 PM
 
2,125 posts, read 896,556 times
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We've been here 11 years. We have friends and relatives who we visit with or host or go out with and talk to on the phone. But they don't live in the neighborhood. They live anywhere from 20 minutes to 2 hours away. Some people in the neighborhood are friendly but everyone minds their own business. Some have lived here for decades, others come and go. We occasionally chat for a minute or two with a few people when we are walking our dog, or say hi, but nothing deep. There's no neighborhood social life or community gatherings here. It's a fairly large town, about 100,000 residents, and some people make the 75 minute commute to NYC for work. There are more upscale developments nearby with manicured lawns and cookie cutter homes but I prefer our older, less expensive mix of nicer and more run down homes. As I said before it's a live and let live environment. No one is trying to impress anyone or judge them either.

I'm just questioning why class would enter into it. I have a masters degree. I was responsible for setting up, trouble shooting and maintaining enterprise servers. I was very well paid have a great pension and could afford to live anywhere. My neighbor was a tinsmith. We talk to him occasionally when we run into him. Our dog loves him and his grand daughter and daughter who live with him. We like his dog. I helped him with his computer and printer, and he helped me remove a stump from my front yard. The only other professional I know of who lives in the neighborhood is an ex FBI agent who actually is a hermit who never cuts his grass or trims his bushes. No one cares. I've never seen him.

Basically everyone in the neighborhood is working class. I doubt if anyone knows I was not, or would care. But I never did try to impress anyone. When I told people I worked for Con Ed, I think most assumed I was a meter reader.

Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
So you’re going to move at least several hours to a low cost working class place where you don’t know a soul and your only interaction with your new community is “good morning” and “hi”?

No thanks. I have no plans to become a hermit.

Last edited by bobspez; Yesterday at 02:17 PM..
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Old Yesterday, 02:23 PM
 
Location: Central Ohio
628 posts, read 260,187 times
Reputation: 1226
Quote:
Originally Posted by bobspez View Post
Why would you have to discuss anything with your neighbors other than "good morning" or "hi"? What are the socioeconomic boundaries? Why would you exchange worldviews? If you are retired, how would they know what class you are in? I've been here 11 years and the only things I have discussed with neighbors is the weather and our dogs. People are making "working class" sound like uneducated welfare recipients and/or drug addicts drinking beer in a front yard full of rusted car parts and throwing the empties into the street. To me working class means basically manual labor, house painters, construction workers, landscapers, metal workers, truck drivers, bus drivers, mechanics, carpenters, restaurant workers, warehousemen, utility workers, sanitation men, dock workers, factory workers, super market checkers and stockers, etc. These people don't have degrees but make a good living, have nice homes and drive new or well kept older cars. At least in New Jersey. Maybe in other parts of the country it means something like a slum? Should be easy enough to drive through a neighborhood and tell the difference between the two.
Seems like the OP needs to define what he means by "working class". As you point out, working class does not necessarily mean a slum. The area where I now live is different from where I spent my working life and a lot less expensive and crowded, but I've never seen people so obsessed with keeping up their lawns! Borders on insanity to me! Lawns and beautiful gardens and houses kept up. Lots of people who retired from factory jobs/building cars in the past. Maybe college professors and doctors as well. Like others stated, I am friendly with my neighbors, but general topics of conversation are the weather, events, good places to shop/eat, how to keep squirrels out of the bird feeders, etc. I have discussed physics with someone I think maybe once in my entire life. And I love to talk sports if I am around sports minded people....doesn't mean we are low life Neanderthals!
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Old Yesterday, 02:35 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
32,032 posts, read 20,189,752 times
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This may seem odd, but when looking at new towns the first thing I would look up was a search of restaurants on Yelp. It seemed to work for giving me the vibe of an area. Someone recommended Prescott to us, but when I look up restaurants, it was like all diners, burgers, steaks, and BBQ. Anything vaguely ethnic, or farm to table, or nouveau was in very short supply.
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Old Yesterday, 03:12 PM
Status: "Life is good." (set 7 days ago)
 
Location: Colorado
42 posts, read 8,454 times
Reputation: 200
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
Who cares, does NOT impress me. Lots of money made in today's working classes.
Good for you. My deceased dad, who was a milkman all of his life and with an eight grade education, died at the age of 88 a millionaire after putting 4 kids through private school and paying cash for his homes and cars.

Personally, I drive a 14 year old car and live in a modest house in a working class town and I am very, very pleased with my net worth. BTW, the wife always get the new car, I get the hand-me-downs. The best people I know are "working class".

Dang it, the timer went off and I forgot what I was timing.
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Old Yesterday, 03:17 PM
JRR
 
Location: Middle Tennessee
3,721 posts, read 2,250,324 times
Reputation: 5326
Quote:
Originally Posted by marino760 View Post
Well, where I come from suburban is working class. People leave their homes early in the morning to commute to work in various jobs. They work. I assume you also worked when you were living in the leafy suburban area you found to be a much higher quality of life, making you one of the local working class.
When did people living in suburbs stop being working class?
I pretty much agree with you. It is kind of funny how much debate has been about what is "working class". It seems that a lot of it is so that people can smugly say that they are not of that class. Sometimes there seems to be a hefty dose of snobbery on the retirement forum.
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