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Old Yesterday, 03:34 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
32,048 posts, read 20,189,752 times
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Maybe I haven't traveled enough but it seems to that not many places are strictly "working class". Most places we go are obviously a combination of various socio-economic classes. We live in a pretty ritzy area, and there are quite a few "blue collar" workers here, many of them make well over 100K.

I'm not that concerned with how people make their living. I'm sure we can find commonalities with most people. When looking at neighborhoods and such I am more concerned with lifestyle, no I don't like broke down cars in the yard, but I also don't like neighbors who will be judging what year our car is.
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Old Yesterday, 03:45 PM
 
561 posts, read 259,995 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
This may seem odd, but when looking at new towns the first thing I would look up was a search of restaurants on Yelp. It seemed to work for giving me the vibe of an area. Someone recommended Prescott to us, but when I look up restaurants, it was like all diners, burgers, steaks, and BBQ. Anything vaguely ethnic, or farm to table, or nouveau was in very short supply.
The things that I would consider essential are a yoga studio, an indie coffeehouse in addition to a Starbucks, plus restaurants with vegetarian options.

Different strokes, etc.
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Old Yesterday, 03:47 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
32,048 posts, read 20,189,752 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nefret View Post
The things that I would consider essential are a yoga studio, an indie coffeehouse in addition to a Starbucks, plus restaurants with vegetarian options.

Different strokes, etc.
Absolutely. I also looked up supermarkets, craft stores, gyms, etc. I think these types of things are much important than whether your neighbor works in manufacturing.
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Old Yesterday, 03:56 PM
 
1,119 posts, read 539,213 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bobspez View Post
We've been here 11 years. We have friends and relatives who we visit with or host or go out with and talk to on the phone. But they don't live in the neighborhood. They live anywhere from 20 minutes to 2 hours away. Some people in the neighborhood are friendly but everyone minds their own business. Some have lived here for decades, others come and go. We occasionally chat for a minute or two with a few people when we are walking our dog, or say hi, but nothing deep. There's no neighborhood social life or community gatherings here. It's a fairly large town, about 100,000 residents, and some people make the 75 minute commute to NYC for work. There are more upscale developments nearby with manicured lawns and cookie cutter homes but I prefer our older, less expensive mix of nicer and more run down homes. As I said before it's a live and let live environment. No one is trying to impress anyone or judge them either.

I'm just questioning why class would enter into it. I have a masters degree. I was responsible for setting up, trouble shooting and maintaining enterprise servers. I was very well paid have a great pension and could afford to live anywhere. My neighbor was a tinsmith. We talk to him occasionally when we run into him. Our dog loves him and his grand daughter and daughter who live with him. We like his dog. I helped him with his computer and printer, and he helped me remove a stump from my front yard. The only other professional I know of who lives in the neighborhood is an ex FBI agent who actually is a hermit who never cuts his grass or trims his bushes. No one cares. I've never seen him.

Basically everyone in the neighborhood is working class. I doubt if anyone knows I was not, or would care. But I never did try to impress anyone. When I told people I worked for Con Ed, I think most assumed I was a meter reader.
Yeah, this is pretty much my experience.....I don’t have a clue what the neighbors did or do for a living, nor do I care. Given the way prices (and thus property taxes ) have escalated, you can assume anyone new will have some resources, but the older folks taking advantage of prop 13 are a mystery. A couple weeks ago, the guy next door rolled in with a new Range Rover and a new Jaguar F-Type. I think he works construction since there is a marked work truck there overnight. What class would he be in?

I lived one place where everyone had a clue of my net worth because the guy that sold the place to me told all the neighbors I was a cash buyer. Here, I think I’m known as “the German Shepherd lady” or “that Boston fan” since I fly Red Sox and Patriots flags. Given all the hooting and hollering that goes on when a championship is won, I’m sure they think I’m a “beer drinking, mustard eating” woman, as an old Wall St colleague used to call me.
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Old Yesterday, 04:12 PM
 
8,028 posts, read 5,100,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
...Really there’s working class and there’s working class. I think we are working stiff until we retire and we became investment class people, people who live of investments. That’s how I see the difference.
While drawing income from investment vs. labor is a notable distinction, the real class difference is, I think, something else. It's a cultural difference, irreducible to mere money, or source of money. I have more in common with a drop-out from graduate school, who overstayed his F-1 student visa and now works illegally in an automotive body-repair shop, if that person is a good chess player and speaks my native language... than I do with some investment-superstar with an MD and living-room festooned with mementos from international travel.

In fact, here's my litmus test for "class": do you play chess? Do you play it well? To me, if you're a toothless chess-hustler in the city's public-park, who's high on meth, who lives with is mom and can't hold a proper job, you're "higher class" than if you head the legal-team at the investment-bank, or are chair of the surgery department at the local medical school.

Quote:
Originally Posted by bobspez View Post
Why would you have to discuss anything with your neighbors other than "good morning" or "hi"? What are the socioeconomic boundaries? Why would you exchange worldviews? ...
Why? Because the whole point of having neighbors, where by "neighbors" one means not necessarily denizens of adjacent dwellings, but fellow townspeople, is to belong to a social-group. When I was 10 years old, I played with the other local boys, mostly in the street, or down by the creek. This wasn't because we shared socioeconomic class, but because of the accident of us being geographic neighbors. But adults don't make friends so easily. While I don't necessarily need to share world-views with my neighbors, it would be intensely pleasurable to be able to engage in such discussions... to talk about philosophy, politics, history, religion. If for decorum's sake I must fall silent, limiting myself to modest bromides of pleasantry, then this is no neighborliness at all, but deployment in a hostile zone.
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Old Yesterday, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Tennessee/Michigan
28,240 posts, read 47,725,576 times
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I need a retirement city that has good hospitals and services for people over 55 years old. Now I go too a eye doctor for treatments for low vision at St. Thomas hospital in Nashville. Needs also a low cost of living if possible which I know is hard too find any more.

At one time Spring Hill Tennesseel had no property taxes?
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Old Today, 02:39 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SWFL ⛱ 🌴
2,469 posts, read 1,696,911 times
Reputation: 8847
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohio_peasant View Post
While drawing income from investment vs. labor is a notable distinction, the real class difference is, I think, something else. It's a cultural difference, irreducible to mere money, or source of money. I have more in common with a drop-out from graduate school, who overstayed his F-1 student visa and now works illegally in an automotive body-repair shop, if that person is a good chess player and speaks my native language... than I do with some investment-superstar with an MD and living-room festooned with mementos from international travel.

In fact, here's my litmus test for "class": do you play chess? Do you play it well? To me, if you're a toothless chess-hustler in the city's public-park, who's high on meth, who lives with is mom and can't hold a proper job, you're "higher class" than if you head the legal-team at the investment-bank, or are chair of the surgery department at the local medical school.
Which one would you want as a neighbor though?
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Old Today, 03:33 AM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
4,566 posts, read 1,747,072 times
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Go to Roanoke on a yard-sale day, check out neighborhood that might suit you, and chat freely with people who live there. Be honest and tell them why you're asking.
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Old Today, 06:35 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,880 posts, read 17,773,117 times
Reputation: 27917
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mikala43 View Post
This may seem odd, but when looking at new towns the first thing I would look up was a search of restaurants on Yelp. It seemed to work for giving me the vibe of an area. Someone recommended Prescott to us, but when I look up restaurants, it was like all diners, burgers, steaks, and BBQ. Anything vaguely ethnic, or farm to table, or nouveau was in very short supply.
The ethnic and farm to table is kind of a proxy for diversity and affluence. I'm perfectly fine with the diners, burgers, and BBQ, but I also like higher end stuff.

Like I mentioned upthread, the community I live and work in is very working class. It's mostly diners, burgers, BBQ, and chain restaurants. Some higher end, locally owned, and farm to table places have opened here, but they almost always fail in this town. The community, even the affluent people here, generally do not support restaurants like that.

There is a college town about twenty minutes away. While it still has plenty of chains, it has a much more "adventurous" dining scene overall, with more higher end offerings, "locavore" restaurants, etc. I'd much rather go to a nice farm-to-table place than Applebee's.
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Old Today, 07:18 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,618 posts, read 6,483,219 times
Reputation: 10174
I don’t think we have one here in our area, at least I haven’t been to one here. Where my daughter used to live, there’s one, it’s definitely much richer area than where I am, but we’re not considered working class neighborhood either.
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