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Old Yesterday, 09:42 AM
 
766 posts, read 548,444 times
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Can someone list other cities and towns that are comparable to Roanoke? It would be helpful to those who aren't as familiar in understanding the OPs query.
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Old Yesterday, 09:50 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by foodyum View Post
Can someone list other cities and towns that are comparable to Roanoke? It would be helpful to those who aren't as familiar in understanding the OPs query.
Go to the main city-data page and do a search for Roanoke. Lots of great city data to be found on towns big and small.
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Old Yesterday, 09:57 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fallstaff View Post
Probably when people who make a lot of money wanted to see themselves as "Special". It goes something like this: Hey man WE WORK hard for our money.... but ehhh... real work... as in actually working... that's for people who don't make as much money as I do. And sweat. Hence the term "working class" to distinguish between those who are proud of their paychecks and those who should feel ashamed for needing to work. Or as Chris Matthews once put it: "The difference between the people who shower before they go to work and the people who shower when they get off work."

There's another retiree board I read. The well-moneied 7 and 8 figure 401K people who post there call themselves "High income producers." Not workers. That would also imply it's not easy for them. They are "producers." Show up and what... pull it out of a hat? Conjure it up by force of will? Whatever it is they do not like calling themselves workers unless of course someone implies they do not work as hard as someone with a hard dirty dangerous job.
https://www.bing.com/search?q=workin...aguBVA&PC=DCTE

Quote:
working class
[ˈwərkiNG ˈˌklas]

NOUN
the social group consisting of people who are employed for wages, especially in manual or industrial work.
"the housing needs of the working classes"
ADJECTIVE
(working-class)
relating to people belonging to the working class.
"a working-class community"
https://www.merriam-webster.com/dict.../working-class


Quote:
\
Definition of working-class (Entry 1 of 2)
: of, relating to, deriving from, or suitable to the class of wage earners
working-class virtues
a working-class family

working class noun
Definition of working class (Entry 2 of 2)
: the class of people who work for wages usually at manual labor
At first glance it would appear that one of the key identifiers of working class is working for wages as opposed to being salaried. On a closer read that has been my understanding of for years as was my read on the OP question and use of the term.
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Old Yesterday, 10:54 AM
 
2,125 posts, read 895,232 times
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When we retired my wife and I did just that. We relocated from a 105 year old colonial on a 40x85 ft lot in Staten Island, NY to a small 3br/2ba ranch on 1/3 acre in Howell, NJ. Home prices in the neighborhood are around $300K. Real Estate taxes about $6K. We have city water and sewer and natural gas utilities. It's a working class or middle class neighborhood. It has a diversity of residents (white, black, hispanic, middle eastern, oriental) of all ages, and a diversity of house styles. It's quiet and friendly (but not nosey) and lots of amenities are nearby in the strip malls up and down Route 9. I like the distance between houses as we no longer have to hear neighbors at night or early in the morning. It's a live and let live environment. Some people care for their houses and lawns, some don't. No one cares. No pretensions or keeping up with the Joneses. We've been here 11 years and like it. I only heard of one crime (a house burglary with no one home) in the neighborhood during the 11 years we have lived here. We looked at the 55+ communities nearby and passed on them. Houses were more expensive, taxes and HOA were more expensive, lots were small, no fences or gardens allowed, too many rules, no diversity of ages, a bit too cookie cutter and somewhat claustrophobic. One place said they fine homeowners if there are weeds in their flower beds in front of their homes. Our lawn is mostly a combination of grass, crabgrass, weeds, clover, moss, heather, etc. Whatever is green and grows without watering or fertilizer is welcome. We keep it cut and groomed. Who cares what's in it? Our lot backs onto woods. Through the chain link fence we can see deer in the woods, in our back yard we see hedgehogs, in the back and front yards we see rabbits, squirrels, chipmunks and lots of birds of every kind.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Questions and Comments View Post
My wife and I are always driving around trying to find the perfect town for retirement in a few years.

We decided that it would be nice to have a larger home and at least a quarter acre of land with grass and trees, instead of the cramped townhouse we are living in today because it is the only place we can afford in our white-collar dominated high cost of living community. We live in Bethesda MD.

Because we live in a suburban city that has excellent demographics (Rich people), we get many of the benefits. We get: Well laid out neighborhoods, lots of trees and professional landscaping, great schools, wonderful libraries, parks, low crime and tons of shopping and restaurants.

But in retirement, we could get twice the home at nearly half the price if we moved to a "working class" community outside the Washington Metro Area. For example, Roanoke VA is a nice enough town but has fewer nice restaurants, poorer schools, less landscaping, rougher looking neighborhoods, less shopping, poorer libraries, more poverty, and social problems. There are some nice neighborhoods but the community does not offer as much as our current hometown of Bethesda MD.

When I have traveled to working-class communities, like Roanoke, I am so happy to see such nice folks and their lack of ego and friendly personality.

BUT THE HOME WE COULD GET AT HALF THE PRICE and the money we could save for travel and hobbies.

Last edited by bobspez; Yesterday at 11:48 AM..
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Old Yesterday, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
1,673 posts, read 1,541,097 times
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I would also be concerned about local land use and other ordinances when moving into a "working class town." Are there strict ordinances for animal control, humane and ethical treatment of animals or ordinances restricting running a business, parking, frequent yard sales, VRBOs, farm animals, etc. in residential areas? And are these ordinances enforced? And there may be local customs such as having that big weekly barbecue for the extended family or to celebrate every holiday and extended family birthday with a big bash at the grandparent's house. It might be wiser to move into a newer neighborhood with an HOA and to rent first. In my area, once you move from the big city to the unincorporated county area or outlying smaller towns there are few restrictions.
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Old Yesterday, 12:44 PM
 
29,948 posts, read 34,996,460 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQ2015 View Post
I would also be concerned about local land use and other ordinances when moving into a "working class town." Are there strict ordinances for animal control, humane and ethical treatment of animals or ordinances restricting running a business, parking, frequent yard sales, VRBOs, farm animals, etc. in residential areas? And are these ordinances enforced? And there may be local customs such as having that big weekly barbecue for the extended family or to celebrate every holiday and extended family birthday with a big bash at the grandparent's house. It might be wiser to move into a newer neighborhood with an HOA and to rent first. In my area, once you move from the big city to the unincorporated county area or outlying smaller towns there are few restrictions.
Yup and yup. Pickups abound and without a HOA parked in the front yard in some newer neighborhoods
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Old Yesterday, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Austin
12,313 posts, read 7,007,956 times
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Moving to a neighborhood with a different class of people could be very problematic.

when I was a young professional, I rented a place close to downtown Dallas in a working class neighborhood because this home was all I could afford on my salary by myself. While some neighbors were nice, some beat their wives in plane view, kept trucks in the yard, and had unsavory "friends".

Living in this place for a year was a bad experience. I was glad when my increase in salary allowed me to find a safer and better place to live.

Last edited by texan2yankee; Yesterday at 01:20 PM..
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Old Yesterday, 12:46 PM
 
Location: Middle of the ocean
32,012 posts, read 20,179,833 times
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I think due diligence is wise not matter what, drive through the neighborhood on a weekend night, that sort of thing.
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Old Yesterday, 02:43 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
23,847 posts, read 17,764,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ABQ2015 View Post
I would also be concerned about local land use and other ordinances when moving into a "working class town." Are there strict ordinances for animal control, humane and ethical treatment of animals or ordinances restricting running a business, parking, frequent yard sales, VRBOs, farm animals, etc. in residential areas? And are these ordinances enforced? And there may be local customs such as having that big weekly barbecue for the extended family or to celebrate every holiday and extended family birthday with a big bash at the grandparent's house. It might be wiser to move into a newer neighborhood with an HOA and to rent first. In my area, once you move from the big city to the unincorporated county area or outlying smaller towns there are few restrictions.
Most city governments will have restrictions. Counties rarely do. VA is pretty heavy-handed though.
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Old Yesterday, 03:00 PM
 
Location: Albuquerque NM
1,673 posts, read 1,541,097 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
Most city governments will have restrictions. Counties rarely do. VA is pretty heavy-handed though.
Yes, but are they strict? My city has a problem with stray animals and vicious dog breeds but things have improved greatly since passing a more stringent animal control ordiance several years ago. Pets must be microchipped and neutered (except for those with permits in place), limit of 6 pets per residence (4 dogs max), pets cannot be chained for more than an hour per day, very imited sales of dogs and cats, etc. Just a quick look at the Roanoke ordinances and the website just mentions rabies shots are required and limits are 3 dogs and 6 cats per residence.
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