U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old Yesterday, 04:23 PM
 
442 posts, read 120,051 times
Reputation: 1122

Advertisements

Very grateful for loving parents and wonderful grandparents. Working class family that expected us all to go to college which we did. I realize that I was very lucky.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old Yesterday, 04:56 PM
 
1,728 posts, read 606,766 times
Reputation: 3224
My childhood was good by most standards. My dad worked for NCR and my mom worked part time as a sales clerk once I was in school all day. There was a lot of tension about money (my dad would rather spend money on taking us to restaurants and going on vacations than paying the mortgage and utility bills but we never got foreclosed on or had anything turned off.) I didn't feel "deprived" because I lived the same middle class suburban lifestyle as every other family on our street. We had a new car every 3 years because that was what my dad wanted.

The main frustration was that I was allergic to pretty much every food ingredient (cow's milk, eggs, wheat, citrus, chocolate, nuts) and environmental allergen (dust mites, molds, cat, dog, feathers, horses, perfumes, grass and tree pollens, etc) so there were many things I couldn't eat or do or else suffered afterward if I did. I outgrew most of them when I hit puberty but the childhood years were a real challenge. I had to have a special lunch at school and was bullied and mocked unmercifully because of it, for example.

I loved being an only child and never wanted siblings. I'd see all my friends with brothers and sisters and think "I am so lucky that's not me", LOL

The only grandparents I knew were my dad's mom and her third husband The Colonel (not my biological grandfather who died when I was four; he and my grandmother split up long before.) My grandmother was a very dominineering difficult person and I didn't like her much. We were like oil and water. My step-grandpa was nice in his way but distant. They had their own social lives that they were involved in and so each small family group did their own thing.

Overall my childhood was happy. My parents were good people with no bad habits. Mom was religious but my dad wasn't (neither was I after age 11 or so.) I wasn't ever pressured to do things (the only requirement ever put on me was to get my high school diploma) and my skills or lack of same were both accepted for what they were. For example I was horrible at math but as long as I got a passing grade that was okay; but they were also very proud that I always got straight As in English and History. However, if I had WANTED to go to college, which I did definitely did not because high school was hell socially and I wanted nothing more to do with school because of that, I'm sure they'd have moved heaven and earth to enable me to go.

I was given an allowance but not required to do chores for it; I think my first allowance was 25 cents a week that gradually increased to $1 and then to $5. I remember arguing for increases every time the price of the Archie and Classics Illustrated comics went up, LOL. And then once I was in high school there were clothes and makeup to buy...

When I got my junior license at 17 my dad bought a used car for me from a co-worker of his. At the time he told me it cost $400. Many years later I accidentally found out, from some old papers after my parents died, that he'd actually paid $1000 for it. It was a 1960 Lincoln Continental that had cost $7000 when new seven years before. But that was typical of my dad, he'd rather spend his money on something to make somebody else happy than for boring stuff like paying bills. :-)

Last edited by BBCjunkie; Yesterday at 05:14 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 05:09 PM
 
6,411 posts, read 5,122,551 times
Reputation: 13037
It was wonderful. Looking back now, we were lucky. We did have to work hard - practically migrant workers, but it made us stronger.

I was told recently that we must have had lots of money since many of us managed to go to college. I thought - nope. We just didn't buy new clothes, cars etc. Education was important.

We had great parents. I miss them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 05:16 PM
 
5,525 posts, read 2,891,481 times
Reputation: 10398
Far from ideal, but we always had a home, a car, hot meals, clothing, and the parental watchfulness pretty standard during that era. No substance abuse, no financial nightmares, and my parents valued education and self-discipline.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 05:27 PM
 
Location: planet earth
5,034 posts, read 1,920,193 times
Reputation: 11106
This is a GREAT QUESTION. At one point, I would have told you it was sub-par, and maybe even tragic. I was not yet aware of how absolutely privileged I was!

Now I view it as almost magical - there were so many good things (and one or two "bad" things) . . . I had been focusing on the "bad" things and my parents "failings," but NOW I feel so fortunate! Feel like I won the lottery as far as childhoods go!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 05:49 PM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
3,973 posts, read 2,907,089 times
Reputation: 6363
Pretty good. Middle to upper middle class. 4 kids. Dad worked for a big chicken farm as sort of a large scale veterinarian (which he was) taking care of huge flocks; proper vaccination, properly designed and maintained chicken houses, etc. His company would send him to the AVMA convention every year and give him about a month off to do it. They were all over the US and we drove pulling a camper and stopping at all the parks. you know the stereotype - station wagon with stickers from just about every national park and several state ones plastered over the back window, loaded with kids and pulling a pop up. That was us. I was in 46 states + Canada and Mexico before I ever set foot on an airplane. We saw lots of extended family and often. Stayed mostly in one place after I was 6.

There was tension and unhappiness that developed between my parents but not while we were young. They divorced when I was 19 and my youngest sibling 17. So it wasn't ever really a broken home. I was a terror as a teen, but that wasn't their fault.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 05:54 PM
Status: "Loving life, wife and job!" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: USA
1,039 posts, read 404,730 times
Reputation: 2843
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBCjunkie View Post
My childhood was good by most standards. My dad worked for NCR and my mom worked part time as a sales clerk once I was in school all day. There was a lot of tension about money (my dad would rather spend money on taking us to restaurants and going on vacations than paying the mortgage and utility bills but we never got foreclosed on or had anything turned off.) I didn't feel "deprived" because I lived the same middle class suburban lifestyle as every other family on our street. We had a new car every 3 years because that was what my dad wanted.

The main frustration was that I was allergic to pretty much every food ingredient (cow's milk, eggs, wheat, citrus, chocolate, nuts) and environmental allergen (dust mites, molds, cat, dog, feathers, horses, perfumes, grass and tree pollens, etc) so there were many things I couldn't eat or do or else suffered afterward if I did. I outgrew most of them when I hit puberty but the childhood years were a real challenge. I had to have a special lunch at school and was bullied and mocked unmercifully because of it, for example.

I loved being an only child and never wanted siblings. I'd see all my friends with brothers and sisters and think "I am so lucky that's not me", LOL

The only grandparents I knew were my dad's mom and her third husband The Colonel (not my biological grandfather who died when I was four; he and my grandmother split up long before.) My grandmother was a very dominineering difficult person and I didn't like her much. We were like oil and water. My step-grandpa was nice in his way but distant. They had their own social lives that they were involved in and so each small family group did their own thing.

Overall my childhood was happy. My parents were good people with no bad habits. Mom was religious but my dad wasn't (neither was I after age 11 or so.) I wasn't ever pressured to do things (the only requirement ever put on me was to get my high school diploma) and my skills or lack of same were both accepted for what they were. For example I was horrible at math but as long as I got a passing grade that was okay; but they were also very proud that I always got straight As in English and History. However, if I had WANTED to go to college, which I did definitely did not because high school was hell socially and I wanted nothing more to do with school because of that, I'm sure they'd have moved heaven and earth to enable me to go.

I was given an allowance but not required to do chores for it; I think my first allowance was 25 cents a week that gradually increased to $1 and then to $5. I remember arguing for increases every time the price of the Archie and Classics Illustrated comics went up, LOL. And then once I was in high school there were clothes and makeup to buy...

When I got my junior license at 17 my dad bought a used car for me from a co-worker of his. At the time he told me it cost $400. Many years later I accidentally found out, from some old papers after my parents died, that he'd actually paid $1000 for it. It was a 1960 Lincoln Continental that had cost $7000 when new seven years before. But that was typical of my dad, he'd rather spend his money on something to make somebody else happy than for boring stuff like paying bills. :-)

May I ask how your parents fared in retirement?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 07:44 PM
 
Location: on the wind
7,321 posts, read 3,032,854 times
Reputation: 24766
Great. Loving parents with brains who actually carried out their good intentions. Comfortable living, not fancy or overindulgent, but not marginal. Good ethics and values instilled in us which pays off forever. Good support for college which was encouraged but not required. My parents, one sibling and I were always on good terms which was invaluable. Unfortunately my lovely mother didn't live to reach retirement and that almost killed my dad. He became a shell of himself after that despite remaining financially comfortable. People who believe money fulfills all retirement needs don't have a clue.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 07:49 PM
Status: "Land is in California; World is in Florida" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: Galaxy’s Edge
16,431 posts, read 8,952,301 times
Reputation: 1671
I grew up in Mayberry. Very happy childhood, loving parents and grandparents. Lots of good memories.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 08:01 PM
 
Location: S.W. Florida
2,244 posts, read 950,054 times
Reputation: 6315
My first 10 years was incredible. I couldn’t have wished for a more perfect life. At 10 my dad got sick, died two years later, and my life was never to be the same again. The next 7 years are years I have tried to block out from my memory. Lets just say that I moved out at 17 and never looked back and created a life of my own.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top