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Old 08-21-2019, 10:28 AM
 
14,460 posts, read 7,719,749 times
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I've always traveled too much to ever consider getting a dog. You can leave a cat unattended for a couple of days and longer by arranging for someone to come in for a few minutes daily. My girlfriend wants to get a dog when she retires but that really curtails the travel. The transatlantic carriers we use require anything not a service dog to be transported in the cargo hold.
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Old 08-21-2019, 11:40 AM
 
7,961 posts, read 4,510,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
I've always traveled too much to ever consider getting a dog. You can leave a cat unattended for a couple of days and longer by arranging for someone to come in for a few minutes daily. My girlfriend wants to get a dog when she retires but that really curtails the travel. The transatlantic carriers we use require anything not a service dog to be transported in the cargo hold.
Hence the abuse of the service/support pet designation. If you're really never home, you probably shouldn't have a pet except, as I suggested earlier, perhaps a rodent. Even cats have social needs, believe it or not, and form emotional attachments to their owners. They won't be happy (or healthy) just sitting in a house by themselves with someone coming in for five minutes daily to feed them...
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Old 08-21-2019, 12:21 PM
 
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Right now, I can't imagine not having a dog. Now that I've retired, ours seems to enjoy having me around most of the day, and I enjoy hanging out with him too. I looked forward to having more time for the breed rescue group I volunteer with, and I have jumped into that with both feet, running transports (the reason why I bought an SUV last year) and even taking in a foster dog with medical needs--the first time we've fostered in three years. Yes, it's time consuming, especially taking care of the foster dog and getting her healthy and adoptable, but I love the dogs and I love doing this. Your mileage may vary!
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Old 08-21-2019, 12:28 PM
 
5,669 posts, read 2,991,828 times
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Incoming anecdote!

A friend who planned to spend about a week on vacation arranged to have me take care of her cat. The cat stressed so much during her absences that the vet advised her to confine it to the bathroom whenever she was away. That it would feel safer in a smaller, more defined area than roaming inside a house without the owner in it.

My friend said I only needed to come in every two or three days, fill the water bowl and food bowl, etc. I did this. The first time, the cat seemed OK. The second time, the cat seemed OK. No shredded shower curtains or bathmats, no pee or poop in the wrong places. It did not try to rush out the bathroom door. However, my friend said when she returned a couple days after my second visit, the cat had gone beserk and messed up everything in the bathroom. I got the impression she blamed it on me, but I had followed her instructions to a T.

The cat had just reached its limit, I figured. Being stuck in a small room for that much time was asking too much.
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Old 08-21-2019, 01:52 PM
 
7,961 posts, read 4,510,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
Incoming anecdote!

A friend who planned to spend about a week on vacation arranged to have me take care of her cat. The cat stressed so much during her absences that the vet advised her to confine it to the bathroom whenever she was away. That it would feel safer in a smaller, more defined area than roaming inside a house without the owner in it.

My friend said I only needed to come in every two or three days, fill the water bowl and food bowl, etc. I did this. The first time, the cat seemed OK. The second time, the cat seemed OK. No shredded shower curtains or bathmats, no pee or poop in the wrong places. It did not try to rush out the bathroom door. However, my friend said when she returned a couple days after my second visit, the cat had gone beserk and messed up everything in the bathroom. I got the impression she blamed it on me, but I had followed her instructions to a T.

The cat had just reached its limit, I figured. Being stuck in a small room for that much time was asking too much.
Right. I know of a similar case. Indoor-only single cat confined to an apartment with no window. Owner gone all day, most of the evenings, and often all weekend. Went crazy and attacked the owner one day. They have emotional needs. They're not potted plants. People think too much about what they want in a pet and not enough about what the pet needs and wants from them.
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Old 08-21-2019, 05:49 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,813 posts, read 3,340,156 times
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[quote=otterhere;55990688]Right. I know of a similar case. Indoor-only single cat confined to an apartment with no window. Owner gone all day, most of the evenings, and often all weekend. Went crazy and attacked the owner one day. They have emotional needs. They're not potted plants. People think too much about what they want in a pet and not enough about what the pet needs and wants from them.[/quote]




I agree with this so much. Some people look at a cat and think they don't require anything but food, water, place to sleep. So very wrong. I have two cats, they are good company for each other, but they do like spending time with me. They are very affectionate and want to be petted and played with.

It really upsets me how people think of them as an "it" rather than an animal with needs besides the obvious food/water.
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Old 08-23-2019, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,724 posts, read 9,800,437 times
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[quote=NYgal1542;55992654]
Quote:
Originally Posted by otterhere View Post
Right. I know of a similar case. Indoor-only single cat confined to an apartment with no window. Owner gone all day, most of the evenings, and often all weekend. Went crazy and attacked the owner one day. They have emotional needs. They're not potted plants. People think too much about what they want in a pet and not enough about what the pet needs and wants from them.[/quote]




I agree with this so much. Some people look at a cat and think they don't require anything but food, water, place to sleep. So very wrong. I have two cats, they are good company for each other, but they do like spending time with me. They are very affectionate and want to be petted and played with.

It really upsets me how people think of them as an "it" rather than an animal with needs besides the obvious food/water.

My cousin once broke up with a woman because when his beloved Lab was sick she couldn't understand why he was upset. After all, "It's JUST a dog!". Boy, don't EVER say anything like that to an animal lover. Can't imagine anyone not loving their pets and taking good care of them. They are NOT "just" animals.
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Old 08-23-2019, 11:45 AM
 
Location: Tucson/Nogales
17,608 posts, read 21,489,382 times
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I've had 7 ferrets over the last 26 years, and I've leashed trained them all, and when I lived in Las Vegas I even walked my ferrets on the Las Vegas Strip at night. When my last one died, I raced out and bought one the next day, I couldn't imagine being in my house without a ferret around. They're big time sleepers, sleeping up to 22 hours a day. And I leash walk him every night for an hour or so.

And, with all my ferrets, I never took them to Vets, and one day, I wake up, and they're lying on the floor dead. All my ferrets averaged 5-6 years of life. And, of course, if I hadn't given them treats, they may have lived longer. All of my ferrets loved the taste of alcohol, by the way.

I just can't afford to have a dog with the subsequent and expected Vet bills. I just talked to a man walking his dog in the community and he just spent $6,000 on an operation for his dog, and another $1000 to have 4 teeth removed.

I did have a cat at one time, but I'm a ferret man now.
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Old 08-23-2019, 02:28 PM
 
146 posts, read 51,079 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tijlover View Post

I just can't afford to have a dog with the subsequent and expected Vet bills. I just talked to a man walking his dog in the community and he just spent $6,000 on an operation for his dog, and another $1000 to have 4 teeth removed.
I've heard of seniors that would eat canned food because they had to spend money like that on their dog.

For me, a week to 10 days in Bora Bora or Paris would be money better spent.
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Old 08-23-2019, 02:41 PM
 
7,961 posts, read 4,510,204 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rastafellow View Post
I've heard of seniors that would eat canned food because they had to spend money like that on their dog.

For me, a week to 10 days in Bora Bora or Paris would be money better spent.
I don't believe in ridiculously aggressive vet care, especially for older pets (vets will sell you whatever you will buy these days), but that would be another unpopular opinion here, so I won't elaborate. I just hate to see animals sit in shelters because it's "too expensive" to own them. It needn't be. Use your own judgment.

As for the ferret, that would fit in my hamster/guinea pig/bird category. Are they affectionate pets at all?

I was reassured to learn (here) that many rescues will take back their dogs if the owners can no longer care for them and, in rescues, they aren't kenneled but are placed in foster homes. I would encourage older adopters to consider that option.
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