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Old 08-08-2019, 09:21 AM
 
5,669 posts, read 2,991,828 times
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We had two wonderful dogs but no desire to repeat the experience with new ones. Although we didn’t mind the responsibilities during those years, at this stage of life we are glad not to have to find vacation dog care, worry about other people’s loose dogs attacking ours, and so on.

The prospect of a long-lived animal outlasting us also is a sobering deterrent. I’ve always wanted to have a burro that we could go hiking with. They can live a very long time, so that dream is not going to happen. I wish there were a nearby burro rescue that needed someone to exercise their animals on site, as that is something I could help with, if they were willing to train a newbie.
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Old 08-08-2019, 09:27 AM
 
5,669 posts, read 2,991,828 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
As retirees, there seem to be pet-friendly people and people who are against having pets. I never understood the latter. Today we see pets (sometimes service animals or emotional support animals) in public places where they were uncommon or not allowed before. Do you think the popular image of the parrot on the Pirate's shoulder was for emotional support? Some pets are actually workers that do a job. I think cats might be more common among retirees -- at least among people I know.

[CUT]

What are your current and past experiences with pets?
This statement is needlessly polarizing, which you might not have intended. Pet-friendly does not mean “anything someone’s pet does is OK” and “against” having pets means, in most cases, that that person does not want pets himself or herself. Not the same thing thing as wanting to abolish pet ownership.
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Old 08-08-2019, 09:28 AM
 
2,622 posts, read 687,849 times
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We've always been cat people. We've had a male & female - full siblings, as they are from the same litter. The female in the pic below is a grey. She made it to 18.5 years of age. The male is the orange cat; he made it to 20.5.

At this point, we don't want more pets, as they tie us down.

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Old 08-08-2019, 09:29 AM
 
Location: Arizona
211 posts, read 123,550 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by k7baixo View Post
Get a Vizsla they said, itíll be fun they said.
LOL, yep! Familiar with the Vizsla's, they can be a handful as puppies. Going on 30 years having German Shepherds, also a handful as pups.

Other than that, cats, birds, goats, chickens, fish...lots of pets through the years. At some point will probably stop owning dogs and revert back to cats, they're easier to take care of. Can't imagine not having some kind of pet in my life.
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Old 08-08-2019, 09:55 AM
 
Location: Blue Ridge Mountains
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Part of my dream of living in a farmhouse included pets💗 ahhhhhh....I love my 4 rescue dogs and 2 horses.
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Old 08-08-2019, 10:14 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,453 posts, read 6,339,480 times
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Originally Posted by oldgardener View Post
I love them all, but I don't have any at this time in my life because I won't be around for their full lifespan, and I don't want them taken to a shelter or be homeless when I'm gone.
I foster for a rescue and get a fair amount of retirees (older retirees, too) that adopt older dogs because they don't want to deal with the energy of a young dog at their age and don't want to outlive the dog. We glady accommodate because so many seniors are around for the dogs, spend time, don't have to worry about getting transferred for work, family changes, etc...

Half of my fosters have gone to retirees.

Two of them more or less needed a retiree home.

Another friend of mine (in her 80's if I had to guess) asked about adopting a 10 month old dog that I had. I asked her if she really wanted two dogs, as hers was only six or seven. I watch her dog when she's away.

One of them I questioned (still do in my mind) because she adopted a puppy...but she's been working with/for the rescue for a long time so it worked out; she bought a golf cart to walk the dog.
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Old 08-08-2019, 10:27 AM
 
Location: Illinois
48 posts, read 12,492 times
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We currently have 3 dogs and I couldn't imagine my life without at least 2 and that goes for retirement too. My wife and I plan to have dogs as long as we are both capable of caring for them.


My Mom is 83 and has 2 little dogs, I think they really helped her when my Dad died. They are annoying little buggers (I prefer bigger dogs) but they love my Mom.
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Old 08-08-2019, 10:51 AM
 
12,233 posts, read 5,330,842 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
I foster for a rescue and get a fair amount of retirees (older retirees, too) that adopt older dogs because they don't want to deal with the energy of a young dog at their age and don't want to outlive the dog. We glady accommodate because so many seniors are around for the dogs, spend time, don't have to worry about getting transferred for work, family changes, etc...

Half of my fosters have gone to retirees.

Two of them more or less needed a retiree home.

Another friend of mine (in her 80's if I had to guess) asked about adopting a 10 month old dog that I had. I asked her if she really wanted two dogs, as hers was only six or seven. I watch her dog when she's away.

One of them I questioned (still do in my mind) because she adopted a puppy...but she's been working with/for the rescue for a long time so it worked out; she bought a golf cart to walk the dog.
I haven't had the desire to adopt a young dog in many years and I'm only 60. I discovered there are too many absolutely wonderful older adult dogs and senior dogs that need homes. They are usually already potty trained, bond very quickly and easily and have done nothing wrong to become homeless. They have been the most precious and well behaved pets I've had during my lifetime.
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Old 08-08-2019, 12:26 PM
 
Location: The South
5,382 posts, read 3,726,622 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunGrins View Post
As retirees, there seem to be pet-friendly people and people who are against having pets. I never understood the latter. Today we see pets (sometimes service animals or emotional support animals) in public places where they were uncommon or not allowed before. Do you think the popular image of the parrot on the Pirate's shoulder was for emotional support? Some pets are actually workers that do a job. I think cats might be more common among retirees -- at least among people I know.

Anyway...I have become a cat person in my advanced years when I was always a dog person when younger. I can go away for a couple of days and the cat hardly notices as long as he has food, water, and his litter box. He puts on a brief show when I come back as if he is happy to see me. Dogs are a different story and need somebody around every day -- but I love them anyway; I just don't have one. (My wife was a cat person so when our last dog went to dog heaven we got a cat.) As a kid, I had three Collie dogs, occasional stray cats, several turtles, fish, a snake, two salamanders, three ducks, and a parakeet...not all at once. The ducks were (admittedly) odd but not exotic. We had a Carolina Rail, a wild bird, that my brother shot with his BB-gun, and we nursed it back to health for a few weeks and then turned it loose. My parents were obviously pretty tolerant of livestock around the house. Today my yard is teeming with wildlife but these are not really pets although I occasionally toss out lettuce or carrot scraps that quickly disappear. I have a 1500 gallon goldfish pond with about 40 goldfish (they spawned) that serves as a watering hole in the desert so every time I go out something flies or runs away.

What are your current and past experiences with pets?
That's me, so obviously its NAY.
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Old 08-08-2019, 12:28 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
8,453 posts, read 6,339,480 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MaryleeII View Post
Is there a limit on how long you can foster an animal? Do they want the animal back eventually? Or is it yours on a permanent loan?
I think you're confusing it with dog sitting (maybe not.)

The idea is that you get the animal ready to go to a permanent home. So, socialize it, evaluate it, etc, and the rescue then places the dog. How much legwork the foster family does vs the rescue for the placement portion depends on the organization. The foster family gets first dibs though, so if you want to keep the dog you can foster it. At some point though they'll pressure you to either adopt formally or place the dog; they don't want to be on the hook for care in perpetuity.

Lots and lots of fosters end up adopting a dog they fall in love with.

My experience is with two different breed-related fosters (IE, Southeast German Shorthaired Pointer Rescue.)

You take the animal from the shelter or whoever is surrendering it. I've only picked one out of 10 up from a shelter myself, and only one of 10 from someone that couldn't keep their pet. The others were situations where either a different rescue had taken it out of the pound or another volunteer with the same rescue stepped up to take/transport the dog on a temporary basis.
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