U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old Yesterday, 07:47 AM
 
Location: DFW
690 posts, read 187,348 times
Reputation: 1084

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Vision67 View Post
Similar to Stealth, that same wicked witch changed a company resulting in me being squeezed out at 54. At first, I wasn't worried. I had saved plenty.

I thought I'd be fine until my wife started having serious back pain issues and my group health plan from my professional association was cancelled due to the death spiral of a too small membership. Bottom line, by age 61 we were each paying about $1K per month for health insurance premiums with a $5K each deductible.

So at 61 I went back to work primarily for the group health insurance. Our monthly premium dropped to $144.

Bottom Line: The real retirement age minimum is 65. Without Medicare, you are screwed.
True, but I can be on my husband's health insurance. He is younger than me and will be working longer. Hopefully by the time he retires (or sooner) there will be national healthcare, but then there is a political thread for this discussion- only mentioning because it is one thing worth considering in long range plans.

Someone mentioned he could drop dead or divorce me- true- but if I live my life always worried about stuff like that (which is my homeostatic state of constant can't-sleep-at-night-worry-over-every-detail type personality), I'd never live. What the saying? You only die once, but you live every day. I want to start living. I have worked full time since I was 15 years old. I didn't even take maternity leave. Even when I lost my main job for a couple of months, I had my side hustle job. There has not been a day in 35 years where I have not had a SCHEDULE. It's killing me, and yes, I believe sitting for 10 hours is part of that equation.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old Yesterday, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Loudon, TN
5,901 posts, read 4,913,040 times
Reputation: 19901
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarshaBrady1968 View Post
I do exercise both before and after work. Not the same as just sitting and sandwiching that 9 hrs plus another hour of drive time = 10 hours of sitting.... not the same as two workouts PLUS cleaning house or waiting tables or anything changing positions and moving all day. Not really allowed to leave desk and walk around, but I do stand and do squats, lunges, yoga as much as possible. Anyway, the health forum is its own thing. I just wanted advice from people who retired early so thanks everyone!!!
Have you looked into the new desks that allow you to alternate between sitting and standing? There are also low profile treadmills you can put beneath a standing desk. I had a co-worker with bad spinal issues that were relieved by walking. She had our ergonomics department order her a desk that converted in seconds from sitting to standing so she could switch multiple times per day, and even walk on her little treadmill as she worked. If you don't have the option of employer paying for this set up, you could maybe get it out of pocket.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 08:31 AM
 
Location: Virginia
4,031 posts, read 2,084,175 times
Reputation: 11128
Quote:
Originally Posted by mathjak107 View Post
for all purposes the pay checks never stopped because of your income sources , so little to no savings may be needed . not the same situation
Well, I answered her question: I retired early with no real nest egg. No other parameters were stated. Fortunately, since I sold my paid-off house last year, I now have a decent financial cushion as well, although I also have a mortgage for the new house.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 08:47 AM
 
Location: SoCal
13,708 posts, read 6,516,267 times
Reputation: 10234
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bungalove View Post
Well, I answered her question: I retired early with no real nest egg. No other parameters were stated. Fortunately, since I sold my paid-off house last year, I now have a decent financial cushion as well, although I also have a mortgage for the new house.
You wrote you converted your TSP to annuity, TSP is a form of nest egg. May not be big or huge but it still helps.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 10:17 AM
 
Location: Mammoth Lakes, CA
3,202 posts, read 6,983,023 times
Reputation: 7620
Quote:
Originally Posted by oddstray View Post
You might want to look into those before you give up a lucrative source of income earlier than you otherwise would have done.
Many of us who were "young" retirees (I got out at 55) willingly and happily gave up good income to get out and retire. I made $112,000 my last year working and make only $35,000 a year now in pension and am perfectly happy. Someone could offer me $300,000 to return to work for one year and I would tell them to take a flying leap.

Some people put time over money.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 10:57 AM
 
531 posts, read 143,481 times
Reputation: 1316
You need to look at your joint expenses and see if you can afford it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 11:11 AM
 
Location: DFW
690 posts, read 187,348 times
Reputation: 1084
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ulysses61 View Post
Many of us who were "young" retirees (I got out at 55) willingly and happily gave up good income to get out and retire. I made $112,000 my last year working and make only $35,000 a year now in pension and am perfectly happy. Someone could offer me $300,000 to return to work for one year and I would tell them to take a flying leap.

Some people put time over money.
^^ This times 100....except just about time is health for me.

I just saw a meme to this effect (Don't like to link or copy stuff per not sure about the rules)


Fisherman sitting by his catch for the day and relaxing

Industrial guy: Why did you stop
Fisherman: I had enough
Industrial guy: But if you keep fishing, you'd have more
Fisherman: I can only eat so much. There's no point.
Industrial guy: But you could sell them, and get another boat, then more nets, and before you know it, you'd have a fleet of boats, tons of fish, make lots of money so you could retire
Fisherman: Then, what would I do?
Industrial guy: ENJOY LIFE! (duh!)
Fisherman: That's what I'm doing now
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 11:45 AM
 
11,990 posts, read 20,490,497 times
Reputation: 19503
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarshaBrady1968 View Post
True, but I can be on my husband's health insurance. He is younger than me and will be working longer. Hopefully by the time he retires (or sooner) there will be national healthcare, but then there is a political thread for this discussion- only mentioning because it is one thing worth considering in long range plans.

Someone mentioned he could drop dead or divorce me- true- but if I live my life always worried about stuff like that (which is my homeostatic state of constant can't-sleep-at-night-worry-over-every-detail type personality), I'd never live. What the saying? You only die once, but you live every day. I want to start living. I have worked full time since I was 15 years old. I didn't even take maternity leave. Even when I lost my main job for a couple of months, I had my side hustle job. There has not been a day in 35 years where I have not had a SCHEDULE. It's killing me, and yes, I believe sitting for 10 hours is part of that equation.
I know standing would kill me...I stiffen and canít move. But I can walk and push and pull for hours.

I think itís a lack of movement thatís more the issue than sitting vs. standing. So if you go into retail, make sure itís a place that doesnít stick you behind a register.
__________________
Solly says ó Be nice!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 05:22 PM
 
6,902 posts, read 3,842,359 times
Reputation: 14071
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarshaBrady1968 View Post
I have 2 careers simultaneously:

I am an insurance underwriter (desk job)
I am a fitness professional (my chosen path, my degree)

I do not hate being an underwriter, FWIW, I rather like it.
What I hate is sitting at a desk, and having to be handcuffed to the desk and the 8-5. There are UW jobs that offer something different, but not many, and you never know what BS you might have to put up with in exchange for the flexible schedule.

My goal is to retire at 55 (4 years from now) from my desk job, and do only my fitness job, plus possibly a retail gig or something non-sitting. I have zero retirement (used it to buy a house). My spouse has a lot of retirement money, but he is younger than me and will still be working/ ineligible for taking it.

Why am I so stupid, you ask? I feel like sitting is the new smoking and I am paying mentally and physically every single day. Health is my #1 priority, and this unhealthy sitting crap has become a non-starter the older I have gotten.

What is my plan, you ask?
1. I want to acquire an income property - this idea was posted on real estate thread, but only like one person responded, so I'd love more responses on this subject
2. I will still be working as stated: earning probably about $1500 month max
3. Reduce expenses- kids will be gone, only one in college, pay off cars, etc.
4. Hubby will be working for a while longer and I can be on his health insurance (if that will even be needed by then)

Did you retire from your main career at an early age and without any nest egg? How did it go?
No, I didn't. I retired a bit early, involuntarily, but I had a nest egg. I then worked temp/contract for 1 1/2 years to get some $$$$ to add to my Roth account, to beef it up just a bit. But my situation is different. I'm single. As in....there is no one else to share expenses with, or any income from someone else to pay even 1 cent toward anything.

You should be fine, since you have a partner to pay the core bills, or most of them. And it's cheaper per person, when two share expenses (like having a roommate).

BUT you won't really be retired until you aren't working...right? You're just going to drop one of your two jobs. Sort of a semi-retirement.

Biggest issue: What are you going to do about health insurance?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 10:40 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,803 posts, read 40,237,425 times
Reputation: 24076
Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
No, I didn't. I retired a bit early, involuntarily, but I had a nest egg. ...

Biggest issue: What are you going to do about health insurance?
  1. Cobra (for awhile... if you can afford it
  2. ACA - best if your state has a good 'exchange' and you qualify for subsidy (That income level is not hard to arrange / live within (if married) and might be worth moving to an ACA friendly State)
  3. PT jobs with HC (there are a few choices..) https://www.moneycrashers.com/part-t...ance-benefits/ https://www.aarp.org/work/job-search...-benefits.html https://www.thefrugalgene.com/part-t...lth-insurance/
  4. USA Healthcare Cost Sharing ministries (These have worked great for many friends / family for the last 10+ yrs)
  5. Medivacations (Medical tourism) I am really fond of this and has worked excellent for me.
  6. Self Pay...
  7. Move overseas (Some on this forum have given good reviews of how this has worked / is working for them.
  8. Go back to school (student insurance, some colleges offer for PT / and 'senior' students)
  9. Travel Health Insurance (I have done this as well, not intended to be 'primary coverage' ... but not excluded from being primary). They have covered for me. (as long as you never return home... auto cancels the moment you return home)

Surely there are more options...

Get adopted
Marry for HC
stay healthy...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top