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Old Yesterday, 11:14 PM
 
6,891 posts, read 3,839,074 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FireStation46 View Post
Scary.

I hope the solution is found before they reduce any benefits.

Make this part if your dialogue with anyone coming up for election from this day to forever


https://nypost.com/2019/08/06/medica...-for-retirees/
The New York Post is a tabloid, not a news organization or newspaper. It's not a source of reliable information.

I didn't read the article, but I have concerns about Medicare for All affecting Medicare. But who knows what hte effect would be.

There is zero chance that that plan would pass in our lifetime (even if one of the candidates who is pushing that becomes the nominee, which is doubtful). So there's no reason to say that "Medicare is in trouble," when there are just some candidates promising something that can't be passed into law, so they get votes. Candidates sometimes have big plans that have no real chance of becoming law.

Not all Democratic candidates want Medicare for All. Biden, Buttigieg, and Klobuchar do not, as well as a few others. It's mainly Sanders and I think Warren who push that.

Health care is a mess in this country.
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Old Yesterday, 11:20 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
39,730 posts, read 48,037,203 times
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Most so called experts predict it will run out in 2034, but by then changes will more than likely be made to continue it on and on. It's very popular with the majority of the population.
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Old Yesterday, 11:59 PM
 
157 posts, read 108,759 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wit-nit View Post
Most so called experts predict it will run out in 2034, but by then changes will more than likely be made to continue it on and on. It's very popular with the majority of the population.
I believe 2034 is the year that the Social Security surplus will be exhausted. Medicare much sooner.
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Old Today, 12:59 AM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
39,730 posts, read 48,037,203 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rbwpi View Post
I believe 2034 is the year that the Social Security surplus will be exhausted. Medicare much sooner.
Yes you are correct: SS 2034, Medicare 2026, but again changes will come about to continue these programs.
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Old Today, 02:48 AM
 
72,464 posts, read 72,365,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NewbieHere View Post
I think they won’t be reduced but Medicare Advantage is one way to reduce the load. But Medicare for all would definitely bankrupt the system, if Medicare for over 65 is already in trouble.
advantage plans only reduce the load if you don't fall in to their cliffs . they can end up costing 2x the amount of a medigap plan. many low to no premium are basically pay as you go
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Old Today, 02:52 AM
 
72,464 posts, read 72,365,222 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TuborgP View Post
As with SS a simple approach is to increase the premium to the price point where it works. Problem is many Americans don't want to pay for someone else.

With wealth not income concentrated in the hands of so few ( top 30%) asking them to pay so much more than they currently do is probably not achievable.
don't forget we spend our working life time paying in to medicare for PART A .. part B is user and gov't funded on a sliding income scale with the highest earners paying 80% of the actual costs .

medicare for all would never survive without those people paying in for many many years first for PART A like we did . that is why now it is free to us . we paid for it over a lifetime of working first .
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Old Today, 06:34 AM
 
Location: R.I.
1,019 posts, read 623,623 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal_Native View Post
Hopefully all the refugees moving here will get high paying jobs and contribute to social security and medicare coffers.
According to the 2018 FAIR (The Federation for American Immigration Reform) study which a summary was published in the Washington Examiner most refugees enter the US and other countries with no financial resources and few marketable job skills. After they have settled for 5 years the majority of refugees that were able to obtain jobs, the average pay received from those jobs is $11/hour.
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Old Today, 06:37 AM
 
728 posts, read 370,974 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal_Native View Post
Hopefully all the refugees moving here will get high paying jobs and contribute to social security and medicare coffers. [/url]
“Hopefully” is not a plan.
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Old Today, 06:55 AM
 
Location: NC Piedmont
4,002 posts, read 2,920,386 times
Reputation: 6447
My crystal ball goes dark in a little over a year. A lot depends on what happens at the polls in 15 months.
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Old Today, 07:51 AM
 
6,891 posts, read 3,839,074 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal_Native View Post
Hopefully all the refugees moving here will get high paying jobs and contribute to social security and medicare coffers. Even Japan is allowing non Japanese immigrants for that very reason.

Japan needs immigrants, but do immigrants need Japan?
The # of refugees coming into the U.S. is a drop in the bucket for our huge country.

But any worker, whether refugee or citizen or immigrant, must pay into Medicare for a certain length of time in order to qualify for it. Social Security, too. If they don't end up qualifying for it, SS and Medicare keep their taxes they and their employers paid into it.

A highly paid worker will qualify for those programs, and use what they paid into it, if not more. So the country actually comes out ahead with the lower paid workers who come here later in life.

Both SS and Medicare have been expanded over the years to pay for certain things for people who have not paid into those programs for years. That has a lot to do with the financial issues those programs are having. SS pays for disability, even though a worker hasn't worked long enough to qualify for it. Medicare pays for dialysis and some things for people who don't qualify to get regular Medicare.

SS also continues to pay a nonworking spouse, if the SS beneficiary dies. That should probably be looked at, since most spouses work these days, anyway. And maybe it's time to expect everyone to contribute to the economy by working, if they expect to get any SS benefit, whether theirs or their spouse's.
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