U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
 
Old 08-13-2019, 05:20 PM
 
29,995 posts, read 35,084,332 times
Reputation: 11902

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
That's standard blue state stuff.

Try living in Tennessee on that income. There will be very few subsidies.
Thatís a reality of poverty in America. Services vary and often areas with the greatest percentage of poor have less support services available.

Retirees with means can transplant to maximize their retirement resources while others canít.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-13-2019, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,847 posts, read 49,739,391 times
Reputation: 19330
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatTX View Post
That sounds fantastic and really affordable. How do retirees deal with all the snow and ice and extreme cold though? I am pushing 60 and find temperature extremes more difficult to tolerate than when I was younger. Of course, currently, we are in the "too hot" part of the US.
After 18 years of retirement I turned 60 a few months ago. It gets cold outside, so dress for it. Our homes are kept warm. I burn 4 cords of firewood a year, I buy it cut and split, so all I need to do is stack it. During the winter, my Dw brings it inside to burn. Our annual fuel costs have been around $700/year.

Down in the snow belt they do get huge dumps of snow. But up here, that snow-belt passes by South of us. We normally see one storm a week followed by 6 days of clear sunny skies. Each storm will put 4 to 6 inches of snow on the ground. The roads are usually cleared just as the storm ends. As a retiree, I have no job to rush off to, so wait for it to clear up before going out.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-13-2019, 05:31 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,847 posts, read 49,739,391 times
Reputation: 19330
Quote:
Originally Posted by BBMW View Post
Are you getting Social Security also? And it sounds like you do things suspiciously like working to make some cash.
No, I do not get SS. I have a few more years to go before I will be old enough. I have only been retired for 18 years you know.

I like gardening and raising livestock.

When I was 22 I told the girl I was courting that in the future I wanted to live in the forest, garden and raise livestock, in an off-grid house. She agreed to focus on that as our goal together. We were married and this was our goal all along.

We sell a few things at a Farmers Market, we have never made over $1,000/year as vendors in the Farmer's Market.

We do more bartering than cash sales.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2019, 04:57 AM
 
1,483 posts, read 712,115 times
Reputation: 4720
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
After 18 years of retirement I turned 60 a few months ago. It gets cold outside, so dress for it. Our homes are kept warm. I burn 4 cords of firewood a year, I buy it cut and split, so all I need to do is stack it. During the winter, my Dw brings it inside to burn. Our annual fuel costs have been around $700/year.

Down in the snow belt they do get huge dumps of snow. But up here, that snow-belt passes by South of us. We normally see one storm a week followed by 6 days of clear sunny skies. Each storm will put 4 to 6 inches of snow on the ground. The roads are usually cleared just as the storm ends. As a retiree, I have no job to rush off to, so wait for it to clear up before going out.
If you don`t mind my asking Submariner, do you have plans in place, if you can no longer do these things, as you age? As much as you enjoy your life....it is a hard life.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2019, 07:21 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,847 posts, read 49,739,391 times
Reputation: 19330
Quote:
Originally Posted by marcandme View Post
If you don`t mind my asking Submariner, do you have plans in place, if you can no longer do these things, as you age? As much as you enjoy your life....it is a hard life.
I have a solar thermal system mounted that I plan to connect to this fall. It should heat our home, so we will no longer require to consume firewood. The firewood we now have stacked will be for backup. Our home will be self-powered and self-heated [which is an interesting new trend in homes around here].
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2019, 08:56 AM
 
2,490 posts, read 638,796 times
Reputation: 4333
Quote:
Originally Posted by CatTX View Post
That sounds fantastic and really affordable. How do retirees deal with all the snow and ice and extreme cold though? I am pushing 60 and find temperature extremes more difficult to tolerate than when I was younger. Of course, currently, we are in the "too hot" part of the US.
I might be able to give you some perspective. We spend winters in a ski resort town - Deer Valley UT. This past winter I measured well over 400 inches of snow in my driveway - thankfully not all at once. I skied about 1.1 million vertical feet.

Regarding seniors & coping with snow & cold: Our driveway is heated - I have boilers that heat a liquid (basically antifreeze) that is circulated through tubes underneath the concrete of the driveway. Many neighbors have the same setup while others just hire a service to plow the driveway after every storm. Some just fire up their own snowblower.

The city streets are well plowed and well maintained. I still need to snowblow around my hot tub & backyard deck; I do this myself but others just have an inexpensive service that takes care of everything for them.

We're part of a very active "Empty Nester" club of active retirees. The ages range from the 50s through their 90s, and wintertime outdoor activities include downhill skiing, cross-country skiing, ski-skating, ice skating, snow shoeing (usually in a nearby Eco Preserve), snowmobiling and the like. Indoor activities include pretty much anything that can be done indoors, from guest lectures given by academics to game nights to morning coffee gatherings to gourmet dining clubs to wine tastings to Superbowl parties to ... well, you name it.

The snow never gets in the way of anything, really. If it is a raging blizzard, you might decide not to go out; at the same time, others will go out and of course drive cautiously.

The snow out west is qualitatively different from the snow in the upper midwest or northeast. The snow in the west isn't as wet and therefore isn't as heavy. The air in the west is dry both in the summer AND the winter, despite snow on the ground. It is not humid - in fact, one of the recommendations of locals to visitors is to make sure they drink enough water. Have a headache? Chug a bottle of water because you're almost assuredly dehydrated and don't realize it. The snow doesn't melt; it "evaporates" because the air is dry. (OK, the correct verb isn't "evaporate" which is for liquids turning into a gas; the correct verb is "sublimate" where solid snow/ice turns into a gas without first melting into a liquid.)

In the modern era, the cold and snow just really isn't much of an issue. Automobiles are much more reliable than they were 30 years ago, with full-time all wheel drive, snow tires, electronic fuel injection, SUVs/CUVs with plenty of ground clearance, and of course the plethora of safety features that are either standard or available on modern vehicles. My point is you're much less likely to get stuck or stranded even during the worst of conditions. If you don't want to drive, there are Uber & Lyft everywhere, even during a snowstorm. Everywhere you'd go from shopping to doctor offices to office buildings etc are completely accessible. There also is a completely free, reliable and convenient public bus transportation system. Most of the buses are electric.

Frankly, the snow and cold seem to be a complete non-issue both for the active retirees and the elderly residents.

Some people, such as us, are part-time residents. We can come & go as we please. We choose to stay during the entire winter, perhaps leaving for - you guessed it - a ski vacation from our ski vacation, going to, say, Whistler or Breckenridge or Revelstoke or wherever we decide to go for a week.

Last edited by RationalExpectations; 08-14-2019 at 09:08 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2019, 09:11 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,847 posts, read 49,739,391 times
Reputation: 19330
I have a tractor that has a pto-powered snowblower that I put on it in winter. Our vehicles are all parked under a carport along with my tractor. Our driveway is not heated [though we have friends who prefer heated driveways]. Our driveway is about 120 yards long. It takes me three passes with my snowblower to clear the driveway for vehicles, about 20 minutes.

The first year that I got the snowblower, after each storm I went out to check on neighbors and to clear their driveways if needed. One elderly lady who lives by herself has an electric-start self-propelled snowblower. She walks behind it like it was a 'walker'. But she clears her own driveway. That one device means that she can continue to live by herself, independent.

The first time I saw her with that snowblower she has the biggest smile I have ever seen.

I have not used a snow shovel in years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2019, 09:15 AM
 
Location: Tennessee
24,068 posts, read 17,905,479 times
Reputation: 28236
Quote:
Originally Posted by Submariner View Post
After 18 years of retirement I turned 60 a few months ago. It gets cold outside, so dress for it. Our homes are kept warm. I burn 4 cords of firewood a year, I buy it cut and split, so all I need to do is stack it. During the winter, my Dw brings it inside to burn. Our annual fuel costs have been around $700/year.

Down in the snow belt they do get huge dumps of snow. But up here, that snow-belt passes by South of us. We normally see one storm a week followed by 6 days of clear sunny skies. Each storm will put 4 to 6 inches of snow on the ground. The roads are usually cleared just as the storm ends. As a retiree, I have no job to rush off to, so wait for it to clear up before going out.
When I was in Maine on vacation earlier this year, one of the things that surprised me most was how much sunnier most of Maine is in the winter vs. where I lived in Indianapolis. Portland receives roughly twice as much sun as Indy.

Cold and snow is much more tolerable if it isn't overcast all the time.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2019, 09:57 AM
 
2,490 posts, read 638,796 times
Reputation: 4333
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
When I was in Maine on vacation earlier this year, one of the things that surprised me most was how much sunnier most of Maine is in the winter vs. where I lived in Indianapolis. Portland receives roughly twice as much sun as Indy.

Cold and snow is much more tolerable if it isn't overcast all the time.
I agree. Out west we have sunshine as well. Yes, of course, there are overcast days, but there are tons of sunny days as well.

Mods: I own the copyrights to all these photographs.







Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2019, 10:11 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,847 posts, read 49,739,391 times
Reputation: 19330
Quote:
Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
When I was in Maine on vacation earlier this year, one of the things that surprised me most was how much sunnier most of Maine is in the winter vs. where I lived in Indianapolis. Portland receives roughly twice as much sun as Indy.

Cold and snow is much more tolerable if it isn't overcast all the time.
I have been paying close attention to the 'Snow belt'

The region East of the Great Lakes, gets huge dumps of snow and rain.

This region is basically "Grand Rapids-Detroit-Cleveland-Toronto-Buffalo-Rochester-Syracuse-Ithaca-Scranton-Albany-NYC-New Haven-Hartford-Springfield-Worcester-Providence-Manchester-Boston".

Not very much of Maine dips down South into that region.

Inside the snow belt they get over-night snow dumped on them, that will be multiple feet of snow in a single storm. We may get that quantity of snow spread out over the course of the entire winter, a couple inches one week, a couple inches the next week, and so on.

Maine gets a lot of summer tourists from the snow belt.

They think we are heroic for living here since we are North of them, they think we must get 10X more snow than they get. But they forget that we are not in the snow belt.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Retirement
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top