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Old 08-14-2019, 02:00 PM
 
Location: Myrtle Creek, Oregon
12,462 posts, read 12,656,269 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rodentraiser View Post
I was going to put this in the Health section, but since the shingles vaccine isn't really available to anyone under 50, I thought I'd put it here.
The vaccine is available to anyone regardless of age, but will only be covered by your insurance if you are over 50. You can always pay cash.

There are several useful vaccines that are not generally covered by insurance. Hepatitis A is an example. Everyone who eats out should have that shot, but it's not medically necessary.
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Old 08-14-2019, 03:46 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,160 posts, read 103,094,225 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LHS79 View Post
Both of my parents got the vaccine in their 60's- dad (who was an MD) STILL got shingles in his late 70's and it almost killed him.

Dad did tell us that the vaccine will NOT prevent you from getting shingles- it only reduces your chances somewhat.
Since this was at least 10 years ago, your dad got the old vaccine, Zostavax, which is only about 50% effective. Shingrix is 97% effective in people 50-69 and 91% effective in people 70 and older.
https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/shi...rix/index.html
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Old 08-14-2019, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Northern Appalachia
5,211 posts, read 6,422,423 times
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I'm 64 and my wife is 60. We are on a waiting list to get the singles vaccine. I think it is a no brainer and would like to get it as soon as possible. The issue is my insurance (UPMC Healthplan) does not have agreements with the places that have it in stock. We get our prescriptions filled at Walmart, but they don't have an agreement for the Shingrix vaccine. There were around 30 people ahead of us at Rite Aid when we went on the waiting list.
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Old 08-14-2019, 10:05 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
22,323 posts, read 14,647,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LHS79 View Post
Both of my parents got the vaccine in their 60's- dad (who was an MD) STILL got shingles in his late 70's and it almost killed him.

Dad did tell us that the vaccine will NOT prevent you from getting shingles- it only reduces your chances somewhat.
Your dad got the previous vaccine. It proved not to be as effective as hoped. Iíve heard that its effectiveness wore off over time or that it moderated an attack, even when it did not prevent one.

The new vaccine is supposed to be much more effective. I know people hate getting shots. But a case of the shingles is no fun.
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Old Yesterday, 01:03 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
23,511 posts, read 28,539,630 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Jo48 View Post
Oh, yeah, that old herd immunity thing. Since I don't get vaccinations, I must have given him the flu, pneumonia, and SHINGLES as well? His vaccinations aren't working because I don't get mine? Sorry, Shingles isn't contagious, but maybe I have had flu and pneumonia and didn't know I did? ROLF I am 70 years old. Only a DOCTOR can tell me that I am sick??????
How many times have you been told there is no herd immunity for shingles?

His vaccinations not "working" have nothing to do with whether you have been vaccinated or not.

His flu vaccine may not have worked because he got a strain not covered by the vaccine. Similarly, the pneumonia vaccine does not protect against all pneumonias.

However, yes, you could carry a flu virus or a bacteria that causes pneumonia and not be sick yourself but give it to someone else.
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Old Yesterday, 04:53 AM
 
Location: NJ
10,864 posts, read 21,511,712 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Since this was at least 10 years ago, your dad got the old vaccine, Zostavax, which is only about 50% effective. Shingrix is 97% effective in people 50-69 and 91% effective in people 70 and older.
https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vpd/shi...rix/index.html
I wonder where they get those numbers from especially when you don't know how many people would not have gotten shingles to begin with.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
With my body being as bad as it is with pain from a failed back fusion; I can end up with enhanced pain. With people experiencing flu like symptoms which go away after a few days, for me it could last months. In the other thread, one person's pain was magnified; they also have strange reactions to things like I do. I'm going to contact them to see how long it lasted.

In the article I linked before, it said "for every 38 people vaccinated, you prevent one episode of zoster, which is an improvement from before"


When I had shingles, it was the worst pain I've ever felt in my life and it lingered. I had it on my eyelid, one or 2 right at the eyelashes. Very painful head/eye ache, stabbing in my eye. Even with pain meds I wanted to blow my brains out. I'm only 54. Had it at 51. I surely do not want shingles again; especially in my eye. In the other thread people posted that they knew people that did get it twice and in the same area.

The link below goes to my post reply to an article that was posted in the other thread. The article is below.

Your Shingrix experience (no vaccine bashing!)




Shingrix vs. Zostavax: How do Various Shingles Vaccines Stack Up?

Quote:
Zoster is not generally a fatal condition. However, if it spreads along a nerve leading to the eye it can cause blindness in that eye. Its main medical symptom though is pain. The pain associated with herpes-zoster can be intense and debilitating. While the pain usually subsides after 3-4 weeks, in some people it can turn into a chronic pain syndrome called post-herpetic neuralgia, which you should not wish on your worst enemy.

... With the development of the varicella vaccine, this has changed somewhat. Even people who were vaccinated against varicella as a child have a risk of developing herpes-zoster because traces of the virus remain in the system after vaccination. However, the risk is much lower than people who were infected by the actual varicella-zoster virus.

Now a new vaccine for herpes zoster, called Shingrix, has been approved. Unlike Zostavax it is an inactivated recombinant vaccine. Inactivated vaccines are different than live attenuated vaccines in that they contain killed virus.... Its efficacy is also measurably better than its predecessor. It reduced rates of herpes zoster from 9.1 to 0.3 cases per 1000 people. This means that for every 38 people vaccinated, you prevent one episode of zoster, which is an improvement from before.

Also, because shingles can strike twice, albeit rarely, those who have had a previous episode should also consider getting vaccinated.


Thanks, this is my biggest fear. Permanent damage
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Old Yesterday, 06:48 AM
 
Location: northern New England
2,546 posts, read 1,121,359 times
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I have been following this thread closely. I had the older shingles vaccine. I want to get the 2 part shot but, living alone, I have a great fear of being sick. But from what I am reading, it only lasts a few days if at all. So I guess I will schedule both shots on Fridays and have the weekend to recover.
I have know quite a few people who got shingles and I don't want to get it.


There is still the problem of availability of the shots, in this area.
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Old Yesterday, 09:54 AM
 
10,248 posts, read 6,400,115 times
Reputation: 8531
I had the shingles in my early 50's. So, even though not especially recommended, I got the shot early. My arm was a hot mess, yes I had a massive local reaction. When did they start giving a second shot? I believe I was told the first one would take care of it.
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Old Yesterday, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
87,160 posts, read 103,094,225 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
I wonder where they get those numbers from especially when you don't know how many people would not have gotten shingles to begin with.
You don't understand epidemiology. 1 out of 3 people will get shingles by age 85. Epidemiologists use complicated formulas to figure out efficacy in a group of people. Those numbers will not apply to one particular person.
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Old Yesterday, 10:54 AM
Status: "The dwarfs are for the dwarfs!" (set 20 days ago)
 
Location: colorado springs, CO
5,136 posts, read 2,365,275 times
Reputation: 17106
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
I wonder where they get those numbers from especially when you don't know how many people would not have gotten shingles to begin with.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
You don't understand epidemiology. 1 out of 3 people will get shingles by age 85. Epidemiologists use complicated formulas to figure out efficacy in a group of people. Those numbers will not apply to one particular person.
I think her concern is that her health history may predispose her to a serious adverse reaction to a vaccine. When others look at pro's vs con's; the epidemiology may be relevant but when there is a question of permanent damage; all bets are off.

What she may be looking for, is a reassurance that the vaccine has undergone extensive safety & efficacy testing, in order to help her with her decision. How the epidemiology looks for 'no one in particular' won't be relevant.
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