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Old Yesterday, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Kountze, Texas
259 posts, read 38,603 times
Reputation: 223

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My current job - and looking to retire in 7 years. I finally broke the "assistant" ceiling and am now a Specialist and the sky is the limit.
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Old Yesterday, 05:05 PM
 
1 posts, read 107 times
Reputation: 10
$111K per year as a construction engineer with free housing, and part of the salary was tax free from working overseas.
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Old Yesterday, 05:26 PM
 
Location: Maryland
1,917 posts, read 615,728 times
Reputation: 4232
Never mind
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Old Yesterday, 05:34 PM
Status: "Put the Wet Stuff on the Red stuff" (set 24 days ago)
 
Location: USA
1,530 posts, read 494,079 times
Reputation: 1295
Enough to have 2 homes paid off, 3 cars, nice savings and been around the world on cruises or flown to vacation spots here and overseas.

Been to three Olympic games over the years, at the clinching game of the Stanley Cup game (twice) and a World Series clincher game (once), too many concerts of top liners to recite all while working a job, none of the monies inherited.

Save and make good stock investments.
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Old Yesterday, 06:06 PM
 
3,724 posts, read 945,765 times
Reputation: 4263
Quote:
Originally Posted by FortIrwin View Post
$111K per year as a construction engineer with free housing, and part of the salary was tax free from working overseas.
I hear ya!
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Old Yesterday, 06:08 PM
 
3,724 posts, read 945,765 times
Reputation: 4263
Telecommunications, NC, 30 y/o, HS diploma and "some college", irrelevant

Paid hourly, figures are annual:

Base 91,258
Shift diff 10%
Annual 10%

So $109k if I only work 40 hours. We have a small volunteer force for overtime so that it's not mandatory for everyone. I'm part of that. Worked enough last year to clear $145k. Highest in my life.
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Old Yesterday, 06:15 PM
 
Location: The South
5,320 posts, read 3,691,929 times
Reputation: 8081
Quote:
Originally Posted by AmberDaviesx View Post
And did it make you happy or not

At one stage in my life ,I was making 95k a year , good money but didn't see much of my family
The last job, supervisor of an instrument repair shop in a powerplant. It was a good job, I had good people and that's what counts.
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Old Yesterday, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Florida
5,387 posts, read 3,097,369 times
Reputation: 9767
Which way is it to the poor house?
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Old Yesterday, 08:10 PM
 
15,970 posts, read 4,220,340 times
Reputation: 11362
I worked for myself most of my life, but still had a salary and bonus, etc just like I gave my (mom and pop biz) employees.

I was happy whether I was making 26K or 100K.

I think the official highest amount I made, all told, may have been 120 or 130K, but that was in the 1990's, so it would be a lot more (inflation adjusted) today.

A very strange thing in my life....when younger I worked amazing hard (remodeling, etc.) and never made more than enough to barely survive. Then I started a retail business and built it up over 20 years....after about 7 I was "making a living". By the end I had made a life.

BUT, I actually made more money after I sold the business! Then I sold the hobby-type business I had started after the retail business (a one-man part-time online thing) and I made even more.....

My final conclusion is something I thought about a long time ago. The people who work the hardest (ditch digger, fast food worker, etc.) make the least. The people who work the least....make the most!

Weird...but true. It's one of the big fibs of life that we are not taught...because, if we were, we'd do things differently. Society needs us to be striving even if it is often in vain.

Someday school will teach my rules.....

1. Being a parent is not easy - think hard.
2. Work smart, not hard
3. The Golden Years are not Golden for many (maybe most), so make sure you consider #1 and #2, because Life is what happens when you are busy making other plans.
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Old Yesterday, 08:19 PM
 
7,014 posts, read 1,495,219 times
Reputation: 17375
About 35 years ago, I worked as the social secretary for a multi-millionaire businessman who was an absolute arsehole. I was as paid the equivalent of slightly more than $100k in today's money with all the overtime I was required to work. He bragged in a magazine interview that he paid much higher than others in his position in order to keep good people, but it wasn't enough to keep ME working for him. I quit after nine months, and I have never regretted it for a second. (Btw, when I quit, I held the longevity record for someone in that position!)
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