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Old 08-20-2019, 11:07 AM
 
8,086 posts, read 5,141,026 times
Reputation: 13806

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Quote:
Originally Posted by BLS2753 View Post
A problem arises when these rating articles encounter geographically large states, where the majority of the population is centered around one area. ...
Indeed. In many Midwestern states, the principal city (or couple of cities) is doing quite OK. It offers substantial amenities and cultural life. Real estate prices are rising, and houses are a decent (if not fantastic) investment. But in the secondary cities and outlying towns, the situation is very much the opposite.

I can't post the link, because it's a "competitor site", but there's a notable recent article, pointing out how the more prosperous Midwestern cities are enjoying population growth via migration from the surrounding locale. For example, Columbus is growing nicely, even though Ohio itself is stagnant (or declining).

Quote:
Originally Posted by DKM View Post
That's for singles. It's double that for marrieds.
Another gripe of mine, is that these articles - and retirement planning overall - is aimed at couples. They rarely address affluent singles, whose aim is to reduce their overall tax-burden.

Quote:
Originally Posted by msgsing View Post
We retired from Ohio to California 10 years ago and have no complaints. Lucky enough to buy during the housing downturn. ...
I wish to be able to do the same, but the timing is atrocious. Ought I to join the chorus of peeved cheerleaders for a California housing market collapse? And then there are the taxes... If you're single and have a lot of dividend income in a taxable account, that becomes a... consideration.
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Old 08-20-2019, 11:57 AM
 
14,345 posts, read 7,654,668 times
Reputation: 26217
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I thought Vermont has always been liberal, but maybe that's because the person I know best from Vermont is a socialist who has been encouraging Bernie to run for 20 years.

Vermont was the first to legalize SSM.

They have a very low population, and in places like that with harsh climates and, people do tend to have the mindset of looking out for one another.

I was surprised, however, when I was at the retreat in Vermont and looking through a book on Vermont history to learn that there was a significant KKK presence back in the 1920s.

Vermont used to be moderate Republican. Not too different from a Rockefeller Republican. By 2019 politics, that's "liberal". Bernie is the fallout from Chittenden County/Burlington being the only part of the state with population growth. The rest of the state is a lot more moderate leaning libertarian.
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Old 08-20-2019, 12:15 PM
 
14,345 posts, read 7,654,668 times
Reputation: 26217
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I have a NYS pension that is taxable in Vermont. It would be better for me just to move to the NY side of the Vermont border. I am not married and my pension is around $80k before federal taxes. I am 61 so no SS yet.

You could move to Massachusetts which has reciprocity with New York on public sector pensions. Cape Cod and the Berkshires have a bunch of retired NY public school teachers, cops, fire fighters, and state workers.



$80K of income filing single in Vermont, you get hammered with the state school property tax and the income tax. Half of your income would be in the 6.6% bracket. The education property tax rate is around $14 per thousand and $80K is well beyond the means test. Most towns, after you add in the municipal property tax, you'd have a mill rate that started approaching an awful New Jersey one.
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Old 08-20-2019, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Connecticut
26,730 posts, read 42,678,996 times
Reputation: 7973
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlb View Post
Yes, where we are groceries are a little more expensive, but Utah wants to increase its tax on unprepared food - that means fruits and veggies - to 4.85%

https://kutv.com/news/local/utah-law...ng-tax-on-food


My god I am so glad we left.

Unconscionable to tax healthy food.
I agree. It is one thing to tax prepared foods, junk food and things you have the option of buying but it is completely wrong and IMHO despicable to tax something you canít live without. Jay
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Old 08-20-2019, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
24,110 posts, read 17,939,559 times
Reputation: 28277
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayCT View Post
I agree. It is one thing to tax prepared foods, junk food and things you have the option of buying but it is completely wrong and IMHO despicable to tax something you canít live without. Jay
Tennessee taxes unprepared food at 5.5%. Until the last five years or so, food was previously taxed at the general sales tax rate, which is 9.5%+ in most counties.

I used to live in Indiana. Food prices here are much higher than in Indiana. Combine the higher grocery prices with the sales tax, one could basically "eat their way" through the income tax savings.
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Old 08-20-2019, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,458 posts, read 4,301,007 times
Reputation: 16450
Quote:
Originally Posted by mlb View Post
Yes, where we are groceries are a little more expensive, but Utah wants to increase its tax on unprepared food - that means fruits and veggies - to 4.85%

https://kutv.com/news/local/utah-law...ng-tax-on-food


My god I am so glad we left.

Unconscionable to tax healthy food.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JayCT View Post
I agree. It is one thing to tax prepared foods, junk food and things you have the option of buying but it is completely wrong and IMHO despicable to tax something you canít live without. Jay
So you want the poor to pay taxes on the food they eat, while affluent people like you would get a free ride. Nice way to put more of a tax burden on those who aren't as well off as you are.
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Old 08-20-2019, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
56,934 posts, read 55,245,359 times
Reputation: 67751
Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
You could move to Massachusetts which has reciprocity with New York on public sector pensions. Cape Cod and the Berkshires have a bunch of retired NY public school teachers, cops, fire fighters, and state workers.



$80K of income filing single in Vermont, you get hammered with the state school property tax and the income tax. Half of your income would be in the 6.6% bracket. The education property tax rate is around $14 per thousand and $80K is well beyond the means test. Most towns, after you add in the municipal property tax, you'd have a mill rate that started approaching an awful New Jersey one.
Exactly.

I do like the Berkshires. Never thought about living there.
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Old 08-20-2019, 08:48 PM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,291 posts, read 2,911,122 times
Reputation: 5061
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
So you want the poor to pay taxes on the food they eat, while affluent people like you would get a free ride. Nice way to put more of a tax burden on those who aren't as well off as you are.

???????????????? Who said I was targeting the poor?

ALL should be encouraged to eat fresh vegetables and fruit. Taxing food to begin with is a travesty for all.. we will all pay if we do not eat healthy. Utah needs to tax the chemical polluters who make their air unbreathable rather than opt for an easy out.
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Old 08-20-2019, 08:56 PM
mlb
 
Location: North Monterey County
3,291 posts, read 2,911,122 times
Reputation: 5061
Quote:
Originally Posted by Darth Vespa View Post
We could echo the above post almost 100%, substituting Wisconsin for Ohio. And we love, love, love California!
Make it 3. Us too....we left and came back.

It was easier for us as my spouse had grown up here and I had lived here 15 years after moving from Wisconsin when I was 22.

We knew we didnít need to be wealthy to live here. And we know how to live on less.
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Old 08-20-2019, 10:11 PM
 
Location: I live in reality.
1,067 posts, read 979,493 times
Reputation: 1918
No list will stop me from moving in my retirement. I'm heading to a southern coastal area where I can walk on a beach, fish is I want to in the ocean, and eat all the fresh seafood (versus 'fishcamp' seafood) I want or get it off the boats at the docks.
Luckily, I just found out my only child is in love with the coast now that he has friends there and goes back and forth. It won't be too far to travel and maybe if I get to be a Grandma, I can spend time with the littles.
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