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Old 08-18-2019, 09:53 PM
 
7,024 posts, read 3,972,965 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by yet_another_userid View Post
Yes. I sometimes wonder if those who talk about paying their nieces to care for them physically, consider that those nieces may be caring for their own parents by that time? It might become a problem if there are no contingencies set up.

Money is only a claim on a personís labor - if there is no person available then no money in the world would help that.

I wonder why any one would ever think or expect that a niece would care for them. Unless she was actually raised by the aunt/uncle, I think there are VERY few if any nieces who have this thought. In fact I would think that they would be alarmed and insulted to hear of this expectation.
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Old 08-18-2019, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
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I read an article last week about how there are simply not enough homecare workers and the like in Maine. It's not that you couldn't hire them - there were very just few available.
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Old 08-19-2019, 01:19 AM
 
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Originally Posted by Serious Conversation View Post
I read an article last week about how there are simply not enough homecare workers and the like in Maine. It's not that you couldn't hire them - there were very just few available.
See Post #39 on this thread.
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Old 08-19-2019, 09:13 AM
 
927 posts, read 544,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Harpaint View Post
I wonder why any one would ever think or expect that a niece would care for them. Unless she was actually raised by the aunt/uncle, I think there are VERY few if any nieces who have this thought. In fact I would think that they would be alarmed and insulted to hear of this expectation.
I wonder the same thing. The fact is that our society has changed a lot. Most women work, and people marry and tend to have children at an older age than in the past. When my aunt (never married/no children) was ailing, I had an infant and a toddler at home and was overwhelmed with my own life. Fortunately she had the means to pay for home care with the rest of us overseeing that. I can't imagine being expected to provide 24/7 physical care for her. Frankly that is quite an opportunistic assumption.
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Old 08-19-2019, 11:09 AM
 
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Why, they need to be legal to wipe your butt and empty your bed pan, or even to shop for you or clean your house? Who cares? Do you want to pay $20 an hour for someone from a corporation to sit around and read magazines all day or pay $10 an hour cash? Even if they are citizens, working for cash and not reporting it is still ILLEGAL.
Quote:
Originally Posted by katie45 View Post
As long as they are LEGAL immigrants!
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Old 08-19-2019, 11:54 AM
 
14,360 posts, read 7,670,501 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coloradomom22 View Post
I wonder the same thing. The fact is that our society has changed a lot. Most women work, and people marry and tend to have children at an older age than in the past. When my aunt (never married/no children) was ailing, I had an infant and a toddler at home and was overwhelmed with my own life. Fortunately she had the means to pay for home care with the rest of us overseeing that. I can't imagine being expected to provide 24/7 physical care for her. Frankly that is quite an opportunistic assumption.

24x7 home care financial math is brutal. In my zip code, that would be a $220,000/year expense going through an agency. Even cash under the table, it would be $130,000 and I'd have to manage 4 employees. My mother has dementia. 4 1/2 years ago, my stepfather had his health event. I got a peek at the will and learned that my mother would be homeless. I had no choice but to move her to assisted living. After 3 years of that, I moved her to memory care. It's still cheaper than home care. She'll be out of money in 18 months. If she lives that long, I'll cross that bridge when I get to it. The CCRC where she is living most likely would do a Medicaid conversion but that's not 100% guaranteed if she goes from memory care to skilled nursing. It's possible she could spend her last days in a double occupancy Medicaid nursing home.


I don't have children. I can certainly see the attraction of flinging a big pile of money at a CCRC and letting them deal with it.
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Old 08-19-2019, 12:01 PM
 
14,360 posts, read 7,670,501 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by VTsnowbird View Post
I was impressed with the quality of immigrant workers at my MIL's place. Most of them had had "better" jobs in their countries of origin (journalist, for example) but could make more money doing NH work.

My mother's memory care facility is largely staffed with Jamaican/Caribbean immigrants. They're not high skill people but they're conscientious and competent with patience and good people skills. It's a high level of care.
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Old 08-19-2019, 12:08 PM
 
Location: Tennessee
24,134 posts, read 17,961,090 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coloradomom22 View Post
I wonder the same thing. The fact is that our society has changed a lot. Most women work, and people marry and tend to have children at an older age than in the past. When my aunt (never married/no children) was ailing, I had an infant and a toddler at home and was overwhelmed with my own life. Fortunately she had the means to pay for home care with the rest of us overseeing that. I can't imagine being expected to provide 24/7 physical care for her. Frankly that is quite an opportunistic assumption.
With smaller families, there are often fewer siblings to share the load.

My grandmother will be 84 in a couple of weeks. She doesn't have any major medical problems, but has some minor things and mobility issues that really limit what she can do on her own.

My aunt is also widowed and does most of the "granny oversight." My mom has her own health issues and doesn't really chip in with granny. Aunt is healthier than mom, but both have a lot going on.

I may end up avoiding this. I'm an only child. I really don't expect mom to be around in five years, and dad's side of the family mostly drop dead of heart attacks.
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Old 08-19-2019, 12:43 PM
 
7,024 posts, read 3,972,965 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Coloradomom22 View Post
I wonder the same thing. The fact is that our society has changed a lot. Most women work, and people marry and tend to have children at an older age than in the past. When my aunt (never married/no children) was ailing, I had an infant and a toddler at home and was overwhelmed with my own life. Fortunately she had the means to pay for home care with the rest of us overseeing that. I can't imagine being expected to provide 24/7 physical care for her. Frankly that is quite an opportunistic assumption.

Glad to know someone agrees with me. One thing I've noticed is how many seniors who never themselves were caregivers to seniors have totally unrealistic expectations of others when it comes to their own later years.
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Old 08-19-2019, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Verde Valley AZ
8,669 posts, read 9,775,657 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katharsis View Post
Will there be enough health workers in your retirement area?

https://www.washingtonpost.com/busin...f08_story.html

(I saw this in another thread, and thought it was relevant for this forum.)

Where I live there doesn't seem to be a shortage of health care workers. A lot of people I know work in health care at the hospital, assisted living places, nursing homes, in home health care and quite a few places that deal with people with "issues". I did in home health care for a couple of years and one of my room mates works with the disabled. I can think of five that quit Walmart to become CNA's. I guess I could always call on one of them if I got desperate!
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