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Old 08-20-2019, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
8,146 posts, read 4,975,602 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by oddstray View Post
What an assumption!

There *are* coin laundries, you know.
When I'm on a multi-day trip, I often wash out garments in the van sink and let the excess water drain into the gray tank. I either lay them out on towels on the sofa in the back or put 'em on hangers and rubber-band them to the overhead cabinet pulls.

I'm not cheap, it's just less effort than finding and using a laundromat.
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Old 08-20-2019, 02:38 PM
 
6,443 posts, read 4,844,839 times
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When I travel I carry 30 pairs of cotton socks, 30 pair underwear, and 30 Jersey pocket T shirts in different colors. I also have extra pants, flannel shirts, a change of sheets, etc. It sounds like a lot but it packs down into a small space. There are some very decent laundromats. About once a month, my wife and I do a half dozen loads and are back on the road in a couple of hours. That has worked out so well, I do pretty much the same at home.
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Old 08-20-2019, 02:54 PM
 
Location: Cochise county, AZ
5,050 posts, read 3,531,214 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Only if you enjoy eating it. Also you will quickly find out it costs several times more than fresh, canned or frozen.
I haven't tried it, I've heard about it. There was a video on Life with Lettie, a 76 year old who did van life for a few months and a person sent her some freeze dried meals she seemed to enjoy.

It did look like a pricey option. Canned goods would be appropriate. Although the Bear Creek items are good. At least the ones I've tried.

Being from Minnesota, there were times you were snowed in and everyone I knew kept a supply of food, canned food or dehydrated soup as an option, just in case. It was very often needed.

I expect nomad living would be similar. You keep a supply of ' just in case' food. Whether you're stuck in a house because of snow or a desert for whatever reason or just don't want to go to the store, food is food and your glad it's there.

Most of the time I lived and worked in the city and streets would be cleared quickly. But, where some of my family lived, way in the country miles from town, it would sometimes take days and at least once that I remember, it was weeks before a plow came through to clear the road. You learned to be prepared.
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Old 08-20-2019, 03:11 PM
 
12,203 posts, read 5,295,013 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
ha ha ha


182 people died in that dry heat in the Phoenix metro last year, most of them over 50.
That was the point I was trying to make. So many people think because there's low humidity, they can handle extreme temperatures and that's usually not the case. Yet, we hear all the time about how it doesn't feel so hot because of the low humidity.
I live in the desert as well and it's seriously extremely hot in the summer. Sometimes I wonder how the tires don't melt off the car.
BTW, you're smart to have a backup generator just in case.
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Old 08-20-2019, 03:21 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
7,457 posts, read 4,301,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pikabike View Post
I once napped under my truck while on a camping trip in the desert. Late afternoon early spring temperature over 100 degrees in a totally open site made me scoot under the only shade available.
You're lucky a rattlesnake didn't try to snuggle up to you.
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Old 08-20-2019, 04:16 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
You're lucky a rattlesnake didn't try to snuggle up to you.
It wouldíve had to cross some fiercely hot ground with no sheltering rocks to get to me.
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Old 08-20-2019, 09:14 PM
 
Location: USA
1,097 posts, read 430,791 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fluffythewondercat View Post
DH is planning to go to QuartzFest, a week-long ham radio boondocking event in (where else?) Quartzsite near the end of January. I'll be wishing him well from the comfort of our home. "Week-long boondocking" -- not for me.
Itís always interesting to come over the last mountain heading west into Quartzsite. In the winter, that area is full of boondockers spread all over the desert and itís a sight. Add the people who attend the gem and mineral shows and itís a party.
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Old Yesterday, 08:29 AM
 
803 posts, read 219,924 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by in_newengland View Post
It's not dirty or disgusting. I wasn't aware that there were people actually forced to live in vans. That's not what I was thinking about. A decent car and a camper that you pull behind it.

There's nothing dirty or moldy about it. Cute little bathroom with curtains. It's sort of like renting a cabin or cottage except you can take it with you. You can get a/c for it. You sleep in it and often you cook in it. It has a stove and dorm sized fridge.

This is the lifestyle for those who love the outdoors and enjoy nature. Toasting marshmallows over the campfire, meeting people from all over the country or keeping to yourself...your choice. Feeling really free.

Most campgrounds allow pets. We always took doggie. If your car breaks down, get it fixed. That's why I prefer the car/camper combo, not a self contained unit.

Although if your vehicle seriously broke down, go stay in a motel for a night or two. It helps if you have a little bit of serendipity and are open to new possibilities. You need to think and problem solve. That's part of being free. I think it's good for people.

But maybe there aren't as many people anymore who like to be free and spontaneous, who love the outdoors and nature, the peace and quiet. People don't appreciate paddling a canoe on a lake and hearing the call of loons (the bird version, lol).

It's like simplifying your life down to basics. You find out who you are and what's important to you. Most of us don't need the stuff we're surrounded with--if I'm camping I live without my precious antiques and paintings, my dishwasher, my big tv (if I even want a big tv). Camping is so basic that you might spend a morning taking pictures of butterflies or eating blueberry pancakes from berries you picked the day before. You might choose to eat at your picnic table or at the little fold down table in your camper. Use paper plates or get a set of Corelle. Drink your coffee and relax while you read online or a book...look around at the trees and watch a bird or a chipmunk if you want to. Nothing is scheduled, you are free. Get in the car and take an excursion to a local attraction, it could be a water park, a lighthouse, a place to indulge in the local grub, whether it is lobsters, BBQ, Mexican, clam chowder, etc. It's all fun you learn to roll with the punches, take what comes, and occasionally make lemonade when you get lemons.

It's the opposite of working. You're doing as you please and when you please. You're fending for yourself and after all these years of working, it's a good way to rediscover who you really are.
Understand, the RV is not for everyone.
I visited some of my RV loving family members and friends when they were” camping” in our area- travelled to see them for a couple of hours in our car.
For the love of God could not understand the appeal- surrounded by all other campers in an “allocated” space in a campground.
The example below is google image- with fancy campers in a nice area to make my point.
I saw much, much worth looking RV with all camping chairs out and in a tightly spaced campground visiting my friends there...

You call it “ nature”? Peaceful?
My RV camping friends have more nature on their own multi-acres property in the lovely and beautiful mountain - forests area
Heck, we have more nature in our private backyard..
Attached Thumbnails
Van Life Sounds Great-28fcc4aa-df51-48ee-894e-cdba9842b5b5.jpeg  
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Old Yesterday, 08:40 AM
 
7,578 posts, read 8,790,258 times
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I agree being parked right next to a bunch of other campers wouldn't be the outdoor experience most would envision when they think of getting away and getting into nature. It's like a version of cubicle life, except the van or camper is the cubicle instead of the veal fattening pen in the office. Either way, people really close, noise, views are not that inspiring. One needs to really get off the beaten path and avoid the crowds.
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Old Yesterday, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Scottsdale, AZ
8,146 posts, read 4,975,602 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nik4me View Post
Understand, the RV is not for everyone.
I visited some of my RV loving family members and friends when they were” camping” in our area- travelled to see them for a couple of hours in our car.
For the love of God could not understand the appeal- surrounded by all other campers in an “allocated” space in a campground.
The example below is google image- with fancy campers in a nice area to make my point.
I saw much, much worth looking RV with all camping chairs out and in a tightly spaced campground visiting my friends there...

You call it “ nature”? Peaceful?
My RV camping friends have more nature on their own multi-acres property in the lovely and beautiful mountain - forests area
Heck, we have more nature in our private backyard..
Yes, but you can't move your house to a different backyard tomorrow. Which I think is the point. So cumulatively anyone with an RV "has" much more nature than you do. An unlimited selection, in fact.

There are many campgrounds where the vehicles are packed together much more tightly than in that photo. It doesn't look like much fun to me, but you can have the comforts of home and then some. That's important to us frail seniors. I doubt many of us set out on 10 mile hikes -- at that time of life, we socialize.
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