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Old 08-31-2019, 10:30 AM
 
2,474 posts, read 2,111,589 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
Yes lots of people buy RVs and spend a huge amount for each day they use it. After a few years many people sell. This is especially true of families with young kids. It might work out for a few years but by age 12-15 getting a kid to spend quality time with parents in an RV is impossible.

An RV is only worth it if it going to be used a lot. Even then it can be an expensive hobby. BTW, easterners rarely get it. When you live in or travel to the west you understand quickly.
Can you please clarify by traveling west and understanding? I am curious what that means.
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Old 08-31-2019, 11:56 AM
 
6,460 posts, read 4,869,303 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jasperhobbs View Post
Can you please clarify by traveling west and understanding? I am curious what that means.
In the East there is congestion almost everywhere. It is easy to visit the few National Parks and scenic areas and find nearby motels and restaurants. A good example would be Smoky Mtn NP. There is Pigeon Drop, Dollywood, and other congested tourist areas just outside of the park That is not true in many parts of the West. The one time I got a flat tire the nearest town was 110 miles away. The nearest town with a selection of tires was about 175 miles away. There may not be restaurants or motels within miles. Even around National Parks that can be an issue. During the Summer tourist season it may be necessary to have reservations many months in advance.

RVs make a lot more sense in more remote areas.
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Old 08-31-2019, 12:07 PM
 
2,474 posts, read 2,111,589 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
In the East there is congestion almost everywhere. It is easy to visit the few National Parks and scenic areas and find nearby motels and restaurants. A good example would be Smoky Mtn NP. There is Pigeon Drop, Dollywood, and other congested tourist areas just outside of the park That is not true in many parts of the West. The one time I got a flat tire the nearest town was 110 miles away. The nearest town with a selection of tires was about 175 miles away. There may not be restaurants or motels within miles. Even around National Parks that can be an issue. During the Summer tourist season it may be necessary to have reservations many months in advance.

RVs make a lot more sense in more remote areas.
Thank you. Makes a lot of sense.
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Old 08-31-2019, 12:22 PM
 
Location: Out there somewhere...a traveling man.
39,853 posts, read 48,305,794 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TimAZ View Post
How many retired people (age >65) actually live full time in RVs? My guess is few because the “lifestyle” no longer matches their physical abilities. As a retiree, part-time RV-ing in a purchased vehicle makes no sense from a financial standpoint. I can rent a RV or stay at fairly comfortable hotels/resorts for far less than the carrying cost of a motor home or fifth wheel + truck.
^^^Exactly, agree 100%.
And you don't have to worry about:
Laundry issues.
Toilet issues.
Water issues.
Mold issues.
Heat/AC issues.
Mechanical/breakdown issues.
Health in the boonies issues.
Storage issues.
Overnight parking issues.
Weather issues.
Theft/safety issues.
Food/cooking issues.
Internet issues.
Leaks, windows, doors.
Dead battery.
Privacy.
Mail.
Wow, all the comforts of home/motel out the window.

Here's a good website about the cons of rving. https://rvlivingnow.com/17-full-time-rving-pitfalls/
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Old 08-31-2019, 01:11 PM
 
6,460 posts, read 4,869,303 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by wit-nit View Post
......
And you don't have to worry about:
Laundry issues.
Toilet issues.
Water issues.
Mold issues.
Heat/AC issues.
Mechanical/breakdown issues.
Health in the boonies issues.
Storage issues.
Overnight parking issues.
Weather issues.
Theft/safety issues.
Food/cooking issues.
Internet issues.
Leaks, windows, doors.
Dead battery.
Privacy.
Mail.
......
Laundry - Laundromat once a month is actually more convenient than at home with only 1 machine.
Toilet - Mine works fine
Water - I conserve if needed and can travel for a couple of weeks even with showers.
Mold - None, ever
Heat/AC - Have both
Mechanical - Only a flat tire in years of travel
Health - Yup that can be an issue for anyone who needs a lot of care.
Storage - I have more space than I need
Overnight parking - No issues ever except in urban areas where I stay in an RV park
Weather - ? I have better weather than in a fixed location because I travel based on the seasons.
Theft/safety - Definitely worse in housing areas. Theft is very rare except for those who leave expensive
generators on the ground.
Food/cooking - No issues with a refrigerator, 3 burner stove and outside grill
Internet issues - Yup, you need Verizon and that may not always work. You can also mention TV but in years of
travel I have never even turned mine on. I think it might work but I am not sure.
Leaks, windows, doors - Had one leak and had to replace a broken door latch. My house has had more
issues with water leaks.
Dead battery - ? Never. I did replace my batteries after 7 years of use just to be on the safe side.
Privacy - You must be kidding. I often stay where there are no people in sight, not even any lights at
night.
Mail - I am close to paperless for all important issues. When I was a full timer I had a mail service and had mail
forwarded every few weeks. At least that was the plan. I soon switched to every month or so and most of what I got was still just junk mail.

Don't waste your time with the idiot bloggers and vloggers. RV travel is not exactly rocket science. My wife and I bought an RV and months later sold the house and were full timers. We had not used the RV even once before that date and still had no serious issues. All the minor stuff we fine tuned as we traveled. Our biggest issue was just bringing too much stuff: too many tools, too much clothing, too much kitchen stuff. Part of the joy of RV living is having a simpler lifestyle with less stuff to control your life.
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Old 08-31-2019, 01:12 PM
 
Location: Central NY
4,813 posts, read 3,340,156 times
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RVs can get a flat tire, can't they?
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Old 08-31-2019, 01:27 PM
 
5,868 posts, read 2,398,946 times
Reputation: 6142
I'm going to buy an old van and fix it up. Sounds easy. I won't go full nomad but getting away for a weekend in it sounds exciting.
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Old 08-31-2019, 03:50 PM
 
642 posts, read 127,033 times
Reputation: 803
On a related note:


https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6S...lh8e0yjndE9o_A
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Old 08-31-2019, 08:38 PM
 
6,460 posts, read 4,869,303 times
Reputation: 13509
Quote:
Originally Posted by StrawberrySoup View Post
I have relatives who live on a houseboat in Europe for several months a year. It is way more expensive than RV living but a relatively inexpensive way of visiting Europe. They spend quite a bit of time on the Seine in Paris.
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Old Yesterday, 05:43 AM
 
Location: Tucson AZ & Leipzig, Germany
2,499 posts, read 7,834,599 times
Reputation: 3900
Quote:
Originally Posted by jrkliny View Post
I have relatives who live on a houseboat in Europe for several months a year. It is way more expensive than RV living but a relatively inexpensive way of visiting Europe. They spend quite a bit of time on the Seine in Paris.
Most people I've seen living on the rivers and canals in northern Europe have a long, narrow canal boat, to fit through the locks. These boats sit low on the water (to fit under low bridges) and many are old but very well crafted. They usually carry two wheeled transportation bikes (pedal power or e-bike), motor scooters, or mopeds for land transportation. I have even seen a few with a small car (like smart car) that can be lifted to shore with a crane. There are thousands of kilometers of waterways that criss-cross northern France, Netherlands and northern Germany.

This has been a dry summer in Germany (so was last summer), and river levels are low. There is not much commercial river traffic along the main rivers like the Elbe right now. It would not be easy for a non-professional pilot to navigate some of the rivers. The canals are probably easier because they are uniform depth & fairly straight.

I take bike rides frequently along river routes and like to see the variety of watercraft that use the rivers.
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